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Old 11-21-2011, 03:29 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
Reputation: 6928

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Highland Ranch is a good place to live for many reasons. It a good place to raise children. It is near many new stores and where the trendiest new stores and restaurants open.

It has some public transit with Call n' Ride services in some areas. It has parks and trails that intertwine through many subdivisions, not the most natural,mostly manicured with walkways with little water resources. It is walkable if you are fortunate enough to live close enough to some stores and parks and recreation but most areas are not amenable to walking to stores and shops, being as it s not so dense and the walking along or across the larger roads with heavy traffic is not very pleasant. Part of the reason for more traffic, is there are many subdivision that do not have connecting streets, so roads spills in the main routes. Most people drive, have multiple cars, and have a need to drive in Highlands Ranch.

Homes are mostly newer, within the last 30 years. Being developments homes tend to appear the same from one to the other, in the same economic level. Mostly all homes are well maintain and have strict HMO requirements. It must be noted that Highlands Ranch is not a city; it is really a large unincorporated development.

It is a collection of perfection that suites the needs, wants and desires of many. You cannot really argue with that idea that gives the residents this happy satisfaction. This perfection does reveal some perceived imperfections that does not fulfill the needs and wants of others, that is why you see criticism. However, these people, like myself, do not live there and choose not to live there. We choose other places which we believe are better, but really only for ourselves. For we really cannot speak or should speak, for all, for other people have other needs. However, we can point out differences for the readers.

Speaking for myself, as I do not have children, so other choices are available. I like old interspersed with new. I like the more natural parks and open space of other areas with more water resources. I like more dense; less heavy traffic; more easily walkable areas. I like older stores and more independent restaurants and I do not care about the newest and the greatest. Most importantly, I want and need better public transit which tend to be in the older denser areas and where not all residents have a car. Being a senior as I age, my needs change, so yesterday, Highlands Ranch would have been my idea of some perfections, Today it is not, because it no longer fulfills my needs.

Also, the people there are mostly younger, many having a narcissistic need; vibrant and have the stress of competing in jobs and professions. That competitive striving personalities carry forth in their everyday encounters. They make everything a competitive race from aggressive driving, shopping, recreations and even in normal conversations or standing in line at a store. At my age, I have no need, or desire to be competitive; and I do not want to be in that race to be better or be perceived as better--I have already lost the race and I am sitting on the sidelines, tired and worn out.

I have relatives that live in Highland Ranch and Lone Tree. I go there often and I know the area.We discuss the differences between these areas, sometimes with passion. They got what they want and I got what I want--so differences are good.

I just went there yesterday and I had the same problem I always have, I get lost in these subdivision, especially at night. I drive around and around and cannot find my way out to the main road, and all the homes look the same--it drives me crazy. When I finally get going to older areas on my way back to Arvada, I am finally free of that maze of perfection.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 11-21-2011 at 03:55 PM..

 
Old 11-21-2011, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,627 posts, read 3,720,209 times
Reputation: 1778
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessicarae1060 View Post
We are moving to the Denver area right after Christmas from Northern Utah. We have a relocation company helping with most of it, but I am still not sure of the area. My husband will be working at ULA in Centennial (is that DTC?), We have 3 kids 6, 5, and 1 and need a 3-4 bedroom rental for $2000 or so. My DH has been there and seems to really like Highlands Ranch, but it seems a lot of people here knock it. Is it really that bad? I am hoping to keep his commute time to less than 30 minutes. I want to live somewhere where the people are friendly and my kids could easily make friends. We will be out in 2 weeks for a house hunting trip. We want to rent until we really know the area...and sell our house in Utah!
I'm going to be completely honest with you.

It's sprawly, it's on the fringe of Metro Denver, it's bland and suburban. Now that's my opinion, of course, so please don't take those things as an indictment on your sense of taste, but for your criteria (friendly people, kids can make friends) and coming from Northern Utah, it's probably just fine. It's a relatively safe area near a lot of open space and it's relatively affordable (pricier than I expected, but far cheaper than living anywhere near downtown Denver.)

Personally? I can't stand the place. I get lost every time I go down there (lots of cul de sacs and confusing curvy suburban streets that look fairly similar), but I'm more of a polarized guy...I like it quite urban or very rural...not so fond of the in betweens. Highlands Ranch is definitely in between.
 
Old 11-21-2011, 09:31 PM
 
246 posts, read 357,082 times
Reputation: 640
Highlands Ranch is a very nice suburban community. I have friends that live there. Typically, the people who hate Highlands Ranch are one of two types of people:

1. Self righteous elitists who point their snouts in the air and criticize "the banality of the bourgeoisie" and their "cookie cutter" ways, while retiring back to their eco-friendly 9000 sqft mansion in Boulder bemoaning the vulgarity of McMansions all while congratulating themselves on their taste for uniqueness and the privilege of telling other people how they should live.

2. People who are still "rebelling" against their provincialism of their parents and disdain anything that reminds them of the protected equanimity of their childhood. Esstentially, they reject anything that reminds them of Daddy dearest. Think pierced, tattooed, postmodern anarchist. Your basic Occupy Wall street type.

Here is a good comparison for you. If cities were people, Highlands Ranch would be happy to be Highlands Ranch and would allow Boulder to be Boulder, However, Boulder seethes and fumes that Highlands Ranch exists and puts down Highlands Ranch all while reminding itself continually how smart, enlightened and most importantly better than Highlands Ranch it is.

Highlands Ranch is a great place for people who want to be happy, raise a family, in a nice, safe, clean environment.
 
Old 11-21-2011, 09:57 PM
 
556 posts, read 1,038,475 times
Reputation: 550
wow, persecution complex much? this discussion has been remarkably civil until you get all antagonistic, stereotyping everyone who does not like HR while complaining that they are unfairly judging the suburbs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calix View Post
Highlands Ranch is a very nice suburban community. I have friends that live there. Typically, the people who hate Highlands Ranch are one of two types of people:

1. Self righteous elitists who point their snouts in the air and criticize "the banality of the bourgeoisie" and their "cookie cutter" ways, while retiring back to their eco-friendly 9000 sqft mansion in Boulder bemoaning the vulgarity of McMansions all while congratulating themselves on their taste for uniqueness and the privileg e of telling other people how they should live.

2. People who are still "rebelling" against their provincialism of their parents and disdain anything that reminds them of the protected equanimity of their childhood. Esstentially, they reject anything that reminds them of Daddy dearest. Think pierced, tattooed, postmodern anarchist. Your basic Occupy Wall street type.

Here is a good comparison for you. If cities were people, Highlands Ranch would be happy to be Highlands Ranch and would allow Boulder to be Boulder, However, Boulder seethes and fumes that Highlands Ranch exists and puts down Highlands Ranch all while reminding itself continually how smart, enlightened and most importantly better than Highlands Ranch it is.

Highlands Ranch is a great place for people who want to be happy, raise a family, in a nice, safe, clean environment.
 
Old 11-21-2011, 10:19 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
Reputation: 6928
Yea, I thought I was very civil and I had a nice balanced post with some good honest information. What does Boulder have to do with this discussion? I do not live in Boulder.I do not have a McMansion. I am considered poor.

I would look real silly as a "pierced tattooed" senior citizen. "postmodern anarchist"? That does not define "your basic Occupy Wall street type". It is many people, of many ages, of many pursuasions that are seeing greed in the financial industry. Perhaps, Calix, that you may be the "elitist" that is threatened by the message that the occupy wall street is trying to sent.

We do both agree that HR is a nice place to live but it is not for all people and as I tried to point out, sometimes it is not for us who have aged and now have different needs.

Livecontent
 
Old 11-21-2011, 11:02 PM
 
17 posts, read 44,225 times
Reputation: 34
Or... maybe people who dislike Highlands Ranch merely value things differently than you do. Perhaps they appreciate character and history. Maybe they appreciate the quick walk down the street to the coffee shop without having to cross a 4 lane arterial street with traffic whizzing by at 50mph. Maybe they like the idea that they could walk to the corner pub, have a few drinks with friends and not worry about the drive home. Perhaps they disagree with the idea that people should self segregate themselves into the housing tract that aligns perfectly with their income bracket. Maybe they think having their kids go to school with a demographic mix that is more representative of the real world is a 'good' thing.
Nah - that can't be it...must be rebelling yuppies.

I don't 'hate' Highlands Ranch. It's comfortable and convenient. It's safe. It's boring. You can actually get a fair amount of house for the money, compared to Central/South Denver. You sacrifice on location, but many people could care less how close they are to downtown and never consider walkability. If you have kids, and you're all about family life, it's a really safe choice and I would recommend it. If you're young, childless, or empty nesting - I'd look somewhere else.
 
Old 11-21-2011, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Newport Coast, California
474 posts, read 495,791 times
Reputation: 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by royhobbstn View Post
Or... Perhaps they appreciate character and history. .... Perhaps they disagree with the idea that people should self segregate themselves into the housing tract that aligns perfectly with their income bracket. Maybe they think having their kids go to school with a demographic mix that is more representative of the real world is a 'good' thing.
Ahhh, yes, the axiomatic, "good thing", so much better than the rest of us. What "real world" is that? Kids who attend school in Tokyo see little that represents most schools in America or other parts of the world. Kids who attend school in Beijing see little that represents most schools in America or other parts of the world. Kids who attend school in Kathmandu see little that represents most schools in America. Kids who attend...... What "real world", I guess those cities aren't the "real world", or you mean the prejudiced "food, clothing and street festival diversity" that liberals love that actually isn't very representative of most any place in the world, but rather a manufactured idea of self congratulation?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Calix View Post
Highlands Ranch is a very nice suburban community. I have friends that live there. Typically, the people who hate Highlands Ranch are one of two types of people:

1. Self righteous elitists who point their snouts in the air and criticize "the banality of the bourgeoisie" and their "cookie cutter" ways, ... bemoaning the vulgarity of McMansions all while congratulating themselves on their taste for uniqueness and the privilege of telling other people how they should live...

......

Here is a good comparison for you. If cities were people, Highlands Ranch would be happy to be Highlands Ranch and would allow Boulder to be Boulder, However, Boulder seethes and fumes that Highlands Ranch exists and puts down Highlands Ranch all while reminding itself continually how smart, enlightened and most importantly, better than Highlands Ranch it is.

Highlands Ranch is a great place for people who want to be happy, raise a family, in a nice, safe, clean environment.
Interesting, Calix called it just like it is. Those that don't like Highlands Ranch do indeed think they are better than those who live there. +1 for you!

Last edited by GoldenZephyr; 11-21-2011 at 11:50 PM..
 
Old 11-22-2011, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Golden, CO
2,181 posts, read 5,637,693 times
Reputation: 2073
The one thing that I always smile about when people mention "cookie cutter" and HR is the fact that A LOT of the housing in DENVER is cookie cutter as well. It's just generally older unless you go out to Green Valley Ranch. Walk around in the Wash Park neighborhood, for instance -- there are a lot of brick bungalows that are the same style and have the same floor plan. Obviously it's not as extreme (i.e., every house isn't a neutral tone, and the styles do vary throughout the city), but it's there.

Same with some of the other neighborhoods, like those from the 1950s and '60s, like the Ruby Hill area. Lots of the same styles throughout the neighborhood.
 
Old 11-22-2011, 08:26 AM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,292 posts, read 8,096,979 times
Reputation: 8926
I love it here. I like the schools, the parks, the rec centers and all the shopping. I am not far from work and I am a hop, skip and jump away from downtown. The wife and I do a light rail date night from time to time. We take it from Mineral to lower downtown. That being said I love other areas of the metro area. I don't think HR is the end all be all that some describe. I love the older look and feel of Wash Park and I love Old Littleton. At this point in my life I am happy to be here. I have incredible neighbors. I have never lived in a neighborhood where we have so many block parties. My little girl has a ton of friends her age in the neighborhood. I admit there is a pretentious element in HR but every area has some form of that. Right now I am about ten minutes from taking my pups to the dog park near Red Stone Park. I love that I have that option. I will walk the green belts to get there and I will encounter other dog owners, walkers and joggers on my way there all with a smile on their faces and something pleasant to say. to each their own. Love where you live. Be happy that you can afford it in these tough times. No matter where you live in the metro area the mountains are still in your backyard.
 
Old 11-22-2011, 09:15 AM
 
2,519 posts, read 3,510,556 times
Reputation: 5081
Rest easy and trust your husbands judgement. Highlands Ranch is a nice suburb. I'm betting you will love it. If not, there is nothing bad about it that would cause your family any harm. The stuff people don't like is simply their taste. Not anything serious like crime, gangs or drug dealers. You will find lots of nice families that have kids.
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