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Old 11-22-2011, 12:13 PM
 
556 posts, read 1,038,373 times
Reputation: 550

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboyxjon View Post
The one thing that I always smile about when people mention "cookie cutter" and HR is the fact that A LOT of the housing in DENVER is cookie cutter as well.
I have no problem with cookie cutter housing. There are blocks of brownstones in brooklyn that all look the same as well. my dislike of modern suburban subdivisions is not about aesthetics or politics or the people who live there. for me it is purely an issue of resources and the environment. the loss of open space, wildlife habitat, crumbling infrastructure and the abandonment of our cities from 1950 onward, worsening traffic congestion and climate change.

 
Old 11-22-2011, 01:08 PM
 
20,909 posts, read 39,195,706 times
Reputation: 19193
Quote:
Originally Posted by woob View Post
I have no problem with cookie cutter housing. There are blocks of brownstones in Brooklyn that all look the same as well. my dislike of modern suburban subdivisions is not about aesthetics or politics or the people who live there. for me it is purely an issue of resources and the environment. the loss of open space, wildlife habitat, crumbling infrastructure and the abandonment of our cities from 1950 onward, worsening traffic congestion and climate change.
Exactly. We have this "argument" over HR on a regular basis. For some reason it's the whipping boy for sprawl, which is widespread not only in the Denver metro area, but ALL metro areas in the nation. I don't get why people like to flog HR when it's generic to virtually all modern suburbs. HR is a fine place if that's what suits a person's needs. IMO having FOUR rec centers speaks well of the developer's intent for HR.

One thing people overlook is that our ZONING LAWS prohibit putting in a coffee shop (bar, bistro, etc) in the middle of a block of homes in suburbs. It is by design that new suburbs are so devoid of the kind of vibrancy that many city neighborhoods enjoy. Most old areas in cities were and still are that way. These days, the only way to have those neat things to walk to is if the developer has all that zoned-in and planned in their filings to build.

So here we are, another thread bashing HR when all we're really doing is bashing the underlying reason, i.e., zoning laws that keep businesses segregated from homes. If anyone wanted to convert an existing home in HR to a coffee shop or eatery, the NIMBY's would be out in force .....
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:42 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,550,538 times
Reputation: 6928
I have been through HR many times. Worked with people who lived there. Have relatives who live there. I think that HR and developments in the same mold should exist. They fulfill an important need for many people and these developments do it well. We have to have different choices in housing for all different people. As I said before, we also have to have different choices of living as our requirements change due to changes in our lives and our age. So HR will be good when your are young with children and may not work well when you are an empty nester.

I do not believe it works well today when you are a senior but the residents are aging. Recently HR has seen some need and is looking to fulfill more needs of seniors. It may not be what all of us like but it will allow these same residents to move into more amenible housing and stay in HR. Certainly, there has been some private development of Senior housing like Erickson and the Hyatt Senior Complex but I think there is a need to have a better design for seniors to age in place in private homes. That is better public transit, more close in, denser and walkable neighborhoods away from the heavy trafficed roads. I think that will definetly happen because demand will drive this type of development because residents love HR and want to stay their whole lives.

HR is a great place to live, but it is not the only place and it is not the best place for all, as some residents seem to believe. It is not a bad place, as some who criticize want you to believe. It is all about needs, wants and desires of people at different stages of their lives, and we need to have all types of living to allow different choices.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 11-22-2011 at 01:53 PM..
 
Old 11-22-2011, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,915 posts, read 29,408,411 times
Reputation: 7144
There are two other over 55 communities in HR you did not mention.

There are plenty of ranch style single family, there are plenty of town homes with no maintenance, there are single family patio homes...

I have lived in Denver since 1989. I moved here from Sunnyvale CA. I have lived in HR since 1999. I have 3 kids that went to Douglas County schools, because that is exactly where I wanted them to go.

There is a senior center inside the rec center. You can be as active, or not as you'd like in HR. You can walk to the grocery store, catch a callnride, take a stroll.

I am not planning on staying in HR after kids graduate college, I would happily move to LoDo. I grew up in DC. I want to grow old happy.
 
Old 11-22-2011, 03:36 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,040 posts, read 20,362,290 times
Reputation: 22811
Default calling Dr Freud

Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
HR and developments in the same mold should exist
I agree. As long as the spores do not impact my neighborhood.
 
Old 11-22-2011, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Prague
1,993 posts, read 2,970,270 times
Reputation: 2633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calix View Post
Highlands Ranch is a very nice suburban community. I have friends that live there. Typically, the people who hate Highlands Ranch are one of two types of people:

1. Self righteous elitists who point their snouts in the air and criticize "the banality of the bourgeoisie" and their "cookie cutter" ways, while retiring back to their eco-friendly 9000 sqft mansion in Boulder bemoaning the vulgarity of McMansions all while congratulating themselves on their taste for uniqueness and the privilege of telling other people how they should live.

2. People who are still "rebelling" against their provincialism of their parents and disdain anything that reminds them of the protected equanimity of their childhood. Esstentially, they reject anything that reminds them of Daddy dearest. Think pierced, tattooed, postmodern anarchist. Your basic Occupy Wall street type.

Here is a good comparison for you. If cities were people, Highlands Ranch would be happy to be Highlands Ranch and would allow Boulder to be Boulder, However, Boulder seethes and fumes that Highlands Ranch exists and puts down Highlands Ranch all while reminding itself continually how smart, enlightened and most importantly better than Highlands Ranch it is.

Highlands Ranch is a great place for people who want to be happy, raise a family, in a nice, safe, clean environment.
I read a post like this and it makes me wonder if I live on the same planet. Some people love cookie-cutter subdivisions, and some people do not. There are blue collar, working class subdivisions, and there are also blue-collar working class "character neighborhoods" and rural areas. There are upscale subdivision areas, and there are also upscale neighborhoods of character and even upscale rural areas.

What's my point? How on earth do you correlate a hatred of subdivisions with elitists? People who like or dislike subdivisions span the entire spectrum of people.....poor, middle-class, rich, down to earth, snotty, etc. If you doubt that elitists can also like cookie-cutter subdivisions, you need to get out and explore that fine area of Orange County, CA where you live. I'm not sure why it is hard to understand that some people like those areas, and some do not. It requires no further explanation. It's like trying to claim people who like the color green are elitist pigs but the people who like yellow are OK. That would make no sense whatsoever, and neither did your post.
 
Old 11-22-2011, 04:43 PM
 
20,909 posts, read 39,195,706 times
Reputation: 19193
Caraway, agree; this sort of thread is pointless and serves only as a venue for unpleasantness. Nothing wrong with people stating a polite case of why ABC doesn't work for them and why XYC does; we all might learn a few things that way. But we learn nothing from mere bashing and trashing. Most of us agree on "to each his own" but all too often we get off track on various topics with groundless comments and judging. As in may things, people should take what works for them and leave the rest.
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Old 11-22-2011, 05:22 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,550,538 times
Reputation: 6928
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
There are two other over 55 communities in HR you did not mention.

There are plenty of ranch style single family, there are plenty of town homes with no maintenance, there are single family patio homes...

I have lived in Denver since 1989. I moved here from Sunnyvale CA. I have lived in HR since 1999. I have 3 kids that went to Douglas County schools, because that is exactly where I wanted them to go.

There is a senior center inside the rec center. You can be as active, or not as you'd like in HR. You can walk to the grocery store, catch a callnride, take a stroll.

I am not planning on staying in HR after kids graduate college, I would happily move to LoDo. I grew up in DC. I want to grow old happy.
You did make my point that HR may be good at a certain time in your life and as you age, you make other choices. Also, You have indicated out some other options for housing and I do agree that they can work for seniors.

I have a relative who lives near Colorado and University. She moved there so her child would near the middle school and high school. There is a path at the end of her development that leads to these schools. She is also close enough to the shopping development at this intersection and the Rec Center is down the road and connected with some walking paths. She also lives in a Call n' Ride area which I have used.

If I move there I would live in one of type of housing you mentioned near the King Soopers. The only problem I would have is the parking lots make it a little dangerous for me, as a disabled senior and crossing University or Colorado would not be comfortable for me--they are too busy.

There are some areas, as I mentioned before, that can be walkable if you live close enough to a retail center. Many more are not, as being too far. However, that is no different than many other areas around Denver. It really involves what you want and choosing wisely.

Livecontent
 
Old 11-22-2011, 06:53 PM
 
441 posts, read 701,857 times
Reputation: 590
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
What's my point? How on earth do you correlate a hatred of subdivisions with elitists?
I think a more telling question is: How does anyone decide to "hate" a subdivision?

I can see people having preferences, but to actively campaign "against" a particular area, or city, or neighborhood, is what smacks of elitism to me.
 
Old 11-22-2011, 07:28 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33077
Quote:
Originally Posted by woob View Post
wow, persecution complex much? this discussion has been remarkably civil until you get all antagonistic, stereotyping everyone who does not like HR while complaining that they are unfairly judging the suburbs.
Civil? Maybe. Unbiased? Certainly not. Arrogant? A little.

Throughout the posts, there runs a thread of negativity about "cookie cutter" houses, lack of diversity, HOAs (that apparently don't exist anywhere else in the metro area), "nonwalkabilty", and that granddaddy of them all, "values".

I recall a thread from way back when someone posted that the Stapelton schools have Stapleton kids only. Somehow that is OK, but it's not OK for HR kids to all go to school together. For all of you complaining about lack of diversity, how diverse are your kids' schools? And what's this business about being able to walk home drunk from a bar? Who has that much of a drinking problem that they can't go to a bar and not get drunk enough not to drive? I don't know of any municipality that allows a coffee shop in the middle of a residential block. You don't see that in Wash Park, either, or Sloan's Lake, where I used to live. As far as loss of open space, did it ever occur to the people bemoaning that that the city of Denver was once open land and wildlife habitat as well? People have to live somewhere. I do agree that most of Dener, including the city itself, is cookie cutter. I've been a visiting nurse and been inside some of those homes, and I didn't even have to ask where the bathroom was, the floor plans are all the same.
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