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Old 11-26-2011, 04:07 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,046 posts, read 20,375,828 times
Reputation: 22825

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Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
And lets not forget the leading cause of death - car accidents.
Finding the supporting is painful.
But, it appears that something called "old age" is the leading cause of death in Colorado.

 
Old 11-26-2011, 04:39 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,188,718 times
Reputation: 569
Quote:
Finding the supporting is painful.
But, it appears that something called "old age" is the leading cause of death in Colorado.
Yes, your logic is impeccable. I think the figure I cited is for folks under - 30? 45? Anyway, I only state this to remind us that 1) suburban life is not necessarily safer than city life and 2) if we choose to drive, please be careful, everyone.
 
Old 11-26-2011, 07:20 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,553,490 times
Reputation: 6928
Driving is a leading cause of death and disability and can be more of a risk if the elderly are forced to drive because there are no other options, as they are risk to themselves and others. Most far out suburban areas do not provide the extensive public transit as a denser areas of cities and many denser areas of the suburbs.

We should be careful not to view all areas of suburbs as having similar characteristics. There are many suburban areas around Denver that are dense and provide similar characteristics as living in a dense city. So not all suburban areas are similar. For example, one can live near Alameda and Wadsworth, in the area of Belmar and the Lakewood City Center. It is very dense with excellent bus service.

With the expansion of light rail into the suburbs, we are seeing more dense development built near these station and consequently provide the similar characteristics of cities. We call some of these Transit Oriented Developments (TODs) and you can see an example near Dry Creek and University and along Park Meadow Drive at the Lincoln Station.

Also I would view the Street of Southglenn as an example of denser development in the suburbs. Similarly, there are ares of Highlands Ranch that are more dense and provide more public transit and close by shopping. Neighborhoods around the Aurora City Center are dense with good available shopping and public transit.

In my City of Arvada, 80th and Wadsworth provides walkable areas of good shopping and good public bus transit. West 58th and Independence; 64th and Sheridan can offer the same amenities. There are so many neighborhoods in the suburbs and they do not have to be so specially designated. They may only be housing near a major intersection on a main bus line, with walkable shops and stores nearby.

What I am saying is you do not also have to choose to live in the city to receive many benefits of city living, as they are also available in the suburbs. It is all about making the right choices.

Livecontent
 
Old 11-26-2011, 07:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Finding the supporting is painful.
But, it appears that something called "old age" is the leading cause of death in Colorado.
Untrue. Age never killed anyone.
 
Old 11-27-2011, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Prague
1,993 posts, read 2,971,173 times
Reputation: 2633
Let me see if I'm comprehending this thread correctly....

1. People living in towns and cities throughout the US often have the attitude that as soon as they move to a place that is just right for them, it's time to lock the doors and not let anyone else in or around them. No doubt the generation before them also said the same thing. Don't make my traffic worse, don't ruin my views, don't make things more expensive, don't tear down the little shop I've been patronizing for the past 10 years, don't give me more smog, blah blah blah. Get over it. The world changes. It always has and it always will. If you want to live in a place that looks the same as it did hundreds of years ago I can recommend a few Bedouin camps in the deserts of Saudi Arabia. Oh, you have lots of open spaces there too.

2. I haven't heard of any recommendations for urban sprawl that don't imply that you are forcing people to live in multi-family dwellings within the city (like most cities in Europe), or denying their right to live nearby. Let me tell you something. I love Europe as much as anyone. I spend my summers there. America is not Europe. Get over it. There are a lot of cultural differences.

3. The last time I drove along I-70 from the Colorado border to the Rockies, the one thought that never crossed my mind was that the "open spaces" were becoming endangered. I suspect I'm not alone in my opinion.

4. I often joke about people being "too smart". You know...the person who over thinks an issue. When we start discussing TB rates in a thread like this......well, just saying.

5. I'm really not sure if everyone understands that they live in the USA. In this country, if people don't want to live in the confines of a city and choose to live in a suburb, that's their right. If a builder gets permission to build a planned community somewhere and people choose to live there that is their right. So what if they tear down older homes. I believe in basic economic principles. If people wanted those older homes more than the homes that were replacing them they wouldn't be torn down. I personally do not like subdivisions with cookie-cutter homes. Not everyone thinks like me though. I have no right to expect everyone to either (America). Some people don't want to raise their kids in the city limits. They prefer to live close, but not too close to a major city. That is their right.

There are some negative effects of sprawl, but these can be reduced not by telling people they can't live there, but instead by better planning at the regional level. That is the key; good regional planning. So therein lies my question to those who might think HR should never have been built. What is your detailed plan? How would you allow growth in a manner that is better, and doesn't ultimately result in removing choice from the equation. For example, doesn't tell someone that if they want to live in Denver, they need to live in a multi-family dwelling, or pay the outrageous single family home prices that would surely exist if growth were too restricted.
 
Old 11-28-2011, 08:03 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
I often joke about people being "too smart". You know...the person who over thinks an issue. When we start discussing TB rates in a thread like this......well, just saying.
Well, thanks for the backhanded compliment, anyway. I said that about TB as a joke. No, I don't really think TB would come back in the hypothetical circumstance that all 3 million of us in metro Denver would live in the city of Denver. But TB is caused by crowded living conditions. I was trying to point out that would be an awfully crowded city.
 
Old 11-28-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Monument, CO
91 posts, read 110,727 times
Reputation: 195
Thanks to those who answered my post. I didn't mean to rake up arguments. I think we will move to HR. In an ideal world, we would buy a historical victorian home in downtown Denver with a yard for kids to play in that is close to great schools and walking distance to a coffee shop. Since that isn't really an option, I have to choose what is best for my family.
 
Old 11-28-2011, 11:56 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessicarae1060 View Post
Thanks to those who answered my post. I didn't mean to rake up arguments. I think we will move to HR. In an ideal world, we would buy a historical victorian home in downtown Denver with a yard for kids to play in that is close to great schools and walking distance to a coffee shop. Since that isn't really an option, I have to choose what is best for my family.
You didn't rake up the arguments. Every time we talk about HR, a "disagreement" ensues.

You are doing what we all do, choosing what is best for your family. Good luck to you.
 
Old 11-28-2011, 12:57 PM
 
704 posts, read 1,504,016 times
Reputation: 629
A handful of noisy urbanistas will puff their chests and proclaim Highlands Ranch a cultureless wasteland of mind-numbing plastic suburbia.

But the rest of us--and, by "rest of us" I mean, the average Coloradan who probably doesn't waste a whole lot of time thinking about Highlands Ranch or any other city in the state, except for Boulder, perhaps--really do appreciate Highlands Ranch for the safe, family-friendly, clean, crime-free, church-going, scenic, and quality school-laden community that it is. And the numbers don't lie: people LOVE Highlands Ranch, they love to move there, and most people don't have a hard time understanding why.
 
Old 11-28-2011, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Prague
1,993 posts, read 2,971,173 times
Reputation: 2633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, thanks for the backhanded compliment, anyway. I said that about TB as a joke. No, I don't really think TB would come back in the hypothetical circumstance that all 3 million of us in metro Denver would live in the city of Denver. But TB is caused by crowded living conditions. I was trying to point out that would be an awfully crowded city.
No offense meant. Just commenting that things were starting to get pretty deep on both sides of the topic.
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