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Old 11-23-2011, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
208 posts, read 354,176 times
Reputation: 214

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The light rail, parks, and walkable downtown affected my choice. Work follows me, although I'm sorry to say I might have to lower my price for my service for a while untill I get established.
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Old 11-25-2011, 05:50 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,832,317 times
Reputation: 13244
There is no question that Colorado is popular with young people, I see examples of that all the time. Colorado is gorgeous, the mountains beckon, and it exudes an outdoorsy, progressive attitude.
Heck, one of the reasons we left Denver was because it was getting kind of crowded (of course it's nothing compared to other cities, it's just that we had been spoiled.)

But young folks moving to Denver would be wise to make sure they first have jobs, and remember that urban life in Denver is like urban life anyplace else, and while the economy might be better than other locations, it is not an idyllic situation. (http://www.lifeoncaphill.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2429&Ite mid=6 - broken link)
Still, if any place could weather an economic downturn, Colorado would be it. This state's time in the sun, like it or not, has come. I mean that figuratively, not literally.

From the OP's article:
The Carolinas have emerged as the preferred retirement destination, according to Del Webb's most recent Baby Boomer survey

This does somewhat jibe with what I see and hear, but to me it is difficult to predict coming trends as Boomers age and have grandchildren. Sometimes the children actually follow the parents rather than vice versa.

About what Jazz said concerning Coloradans migrating within their own state, I do have a few friends and relatives who left for the Western Slope but it's just purely anecdotal, it would be interesting to find hard data on that.
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Old 11-25-2011, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,850 posts, read 102,188,281 times
Reputation: 32933
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
About what Jazz said concerning Coloradans migrating within their own state, I do have a few friends and relatives who left for the Western Slope but it's just purely anecdotal, it would be interesting to find hard data on that.
Every now and then someone posts a map on county to county migration in the US over on "General US". I'm too lazy now to go search for it.
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Old 11-25-2011, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,850 posts, read 102,188,281 times
Reputation: 32933
ETA: I found the map w/o much difficulty!

Map: Where Americans Are Moving - Forbes.com
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Old 11-25-2011, 09:45 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,757,283 times
Reputation: 9130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Got any stats on that "in-state" migration stuff? Didn't think so.

The coming brutal economy? Been blowing that smoke for years.
Tell you what, do a survey of rural Colorado residents (or the neighboring states, as well) and ask how many of their young adult children relocated to the Front Range to find jobs. You will find that it's at least of half of them in most places. Then check and see how many Colorado natives living and working on the Front Range are from families in rural Colorado. By the way, what the pretty map referenced above does not show is the age demographic of relocation. Most of the people exiting the metro areas to rural Colorado are retirees; most of the people relocating TO the Front Range are working age individuals seeking employment. That trend does not bode well for rural Colorado when the "mailbox economy" starts to dry up--and a lot of those retirees are faced with the prospect of trying to find jobs where they don't exist.

You can sit on your transplanted newbie high-horse rump all you want, but I've been studying Colorado demographics for about three decades now. Also, part of my college education was in Economic Geography.

Think I'm blowing smoke about our economic problems? Well, that train of thought is now blowing through even the formerly starry-eyed minds of the mass media now. Fancy that.

Recession fears replace holiday cheer- MSN Money
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Old 11-25-2011, 10:37 AM
 
20,817 posts, read 39,009,891 times
Reputation: 19010
That map shows major influx from out of state, look at the black lines (inbound to Denver) from the northeast, supporting what I said that people ARE coming here as witnessed by the number of threads we see popping up almost daily, and only a tiny number of inbound folks ever use this site.

There is in-state migration, but overall it's a small part of the total migration to/from Denver. That is absolutely normal and is not a new thing due to the current recession.

The SAME situation applies to most states, young folks move to the big city to get away from podunk to find work and they move back to podunk or some other nice place when they retire. Same thing goes on in just about every major city, not just Denver and/or Colorado. That it happens at all proves really nothing.

We've had this argument many times; migration from farms and rural areas to cities began after the Civil War, picked up speed with the Industrial Age and continues to this day. You've yet to make any case why is it so different for Colorado, or why it's so different this time, or why it portends some vague economic catastrophe that sociopathic prophets of doom keep predicting in hopes of watching everyone suffer.

The so-called mailbox economy is fine and will be fine; I hope someday you can join us. Until then, you can sit on your bitter provincial native rump and drive all over Colorado whining to any other bitter natives who'll listen.
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Last edited by Mike from back east; 11-26-2011 at 12:33 PM..
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