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Old 10-25-2007, 03:11 PM
 
Location: New York
2,741 posts, read 2,837,939 times
Reputation: 849

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I had a discussion with my husband this morning who told me that there is no such thing as a walkable neighborhood when you get out of the older urban cities.

I told them that I had read, right here, that there are a few neighborhoods in the Denver environs that have sidewalks, and that are planned so that one can walk to a convenience store, possible to school, or a neighbors home, worship. He doesn't believe me. He states "Only in Florida".

I mention this, because when we finally settle, I would like my kid to be in an environment, where I didn't have to always drive my kid, just to visit her friend. Kids should walk to school, in my humble opinion, if at all possible. Not be dropped of by mom.

Can you please tell me, am I crazy? Did I misread something here?
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Old 10-25-2007, 03:31 PM
 
369 posts, read 841,307 times
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Nope, you're not crazy.

Stapleton and Lowry are both 'new urbanism' types of developments in Denver. In the area there's also Bel Mar in Lakewood and Bradburn Village in Westminster.

Now, they are not going to be as walkable as San Francisco, New York, Boston, London, or Paris by any stretch. But they are at least try to be non-car centric.
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Old 10-25-2007, 03:55 PM
 
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Capitol Hill is the only 'hood I know where there's a large number of apartments that don't come with any sort of parking.

If I were coming to Denver and couldn't (or wouldn't drive) -- that's where I'd go.
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Old 10-25-2007, 04:00 PM
 
Location: New York
2,741 posts, read 2,837,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
Capitol Hill is the only 'hood I know where there's a large number of apartments that don't come with any sort of parking.

If I were coming to Denver and couldn't (or wouldn't drive) -- that's where I'd go.

I didn't say wouldn't or couldn't. But I'd hate to live in a community that has no sidewalks where every thing requires driving. I visited Lawton, OK. Although I was only staying in a hotel, you literally could not walk anywhere, because there were only roads.
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Old 10-25-2007, 04:03 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,759,751 times
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I get you. But I think my point is that if you want to find a walkable neighborhood, the best way to go about it might be to find a place where lots of people are doing just fine without cars. And that's certainly true of Cap Hill.
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Old 10-25-2007, 04:25 PM
 
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I live in Broomfield and think it is quite walkable. The sidewalks are wide so very pedestrian friendly. In addition, there are paths through the neighborhoods. I walk to the grocery store with my child in a stroller and I'm not alone in doing that. I think all of the northwestern suburbs are great for walking.

My kids aren't school aged yet but the elementary schools in my area (Broomfield and Westminster) are nestled into the neighborhoods. I think kids could easily walk to school.
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Old 10-25-2007, 04:36 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by roseba View Post
I had a discussion with my husband this morning who told me that there is no such thing as a walkable neighborhood when you get out of the older urban cities.

I told them that I had read, right here, that there are a few neighborhoods in the Denver environs that have sidewalks, and that are planned so that one can walk to a convenience store, possible to school, or a neighbors home, worship. He doesn't believe me. He states "Only in Florida".

I mention this, because when we finally settle, I would like my kid to be in an environment, where I didn't have to always drive my kid, just to visit her friend. Kids should walk to school, in my humble opinion, if at all possible. Not be dropped of by mom.

Can you please tell me, am I crazy? Did I misread something here?
Quote:
Originally Posted by denver_hacker View Post
Nope, you're not crazy.

Stapleton and Lowry are both 'new urbanism' types of developments in Denver. In the area there's also Bel Mar in Lakewood and Bradburn Village in Westminster.

Now, they are not going to be as walkable as San Francisco, New York, Boston, London, or Paris by any stretch. But they are at least try to be non-car centric.
Quote:
Originally Posted by roseba View Post
I didn't say wouldn't or couldn't. But I'd hate to live in a community that has no sidewalks where every thing requires driving. I visited Lawton, OK. Although I was only staying in a hotel, you literally could not walk anywhere, because there were only roads.
You wil find that virtually all suburban neighborhoods in the metro area have sidewalks. That said, you don't really see a lot of people walking anywhere. Some of the burbs are set up such that walking to do errands, shopping, etc, is diffucult. That is also true of some of the city neighborhoods. As far as kids walking to school, it doesn't happen much. I did a little research project once for the League of Women Voters (I am not speaking for them now, sorry, I always have to say that if I mention their name) where a couple of us tallied walking, driving, busing (public, not school buses), car-pooling, etc at two elementary schools that did not have school bus service. Most kids were driven in separate cars at both, one a charter school and one in a lower middle class neighborhood. The situation may be different in the city schools, this was in Boulder Valley School District.

As far as the "new urbanism" places, my DD (in her 20s) said she thought it would be awful to live somewhere and never leave the bubble. Not that you can't, but if the stores, dry cleaners, etc are all in the 'hood, you won't. I have seen BelMar and didn't think it was all that. It's just a bunch of apts around a shopping center. My nephew and his family lived in Lowry. Of course, they had to leave anyway to go to work. It's fine for some people. I don't know about schools in Stalpeton/Lowry, or if there even are any. Kids may have to be bused somewhere else.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 10-25-2007 at 04:40 PM.. Reason: add paragraph
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Old 10-25-2007, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Denver,Co
676 posts, read 2,542,038 times
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Almost all of the older neighborhoods in denver are walkable considering that some of them date back before cars had become the norm. Many of them have a corner market and other services around it. Most have some sort of school within walking distance as well as libraries and restaurants all with in total walking distance. Some the areas south also have the lightrail advantage so if you need to journey outside of your neighborhood you don't have to drive if you prefer not to. I think also even if people live in these areas or the other areas that were mentioned on this thread that some or most would continue to drive their car like they would do in the most car friendly of areas. Pedestrian friendly is just as much of an attitude as it is an amenity
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Old 10-25-2007, 05:28 PM
 
694 posts, read 1,792,365 times
Reputation: 479
Default Walkable neighborhood in Westminster

It is difficult to find walkable neighborhoods, but they are out there. From my neighborhood, Bradburn Village in Westminster, I can walk (5-10 minute walk) to the following things:

3 bars
13 Restaurants ranging from fast food to sit down steakhouse
A childcare center (daycare)
A bus stop that goes to a main park and ride
A church (although I don't personally attend, still nice to have)
A K-12 Charter School
A nice liquor store
Staples (office supply)
Big Lots
4 hair places from a high end salon to Cost Cutters (where I go : )
2 nail salons
A dentist
An art gallery
A sports clothing store
A day spa
Tires Plus (where I can drop off my car for service, walk home, then walk back to get it)
A cleaners
An urgent care center
A Tmobile store
A few other stores I can't remember

This, and the downtown core of my neighborhood is slated for 12 more buildings, retail first floor, offices second floor (will be a few more years for that to come along though) and a second elementary school in the neighborhood (no time line on that was supposed to be 2007, but now I'm hearing possibly 2010).

Bradburn, like Stapleton, is a new urbanist neighborhood. Unlike Stapleton however--which is huge--every single home in my neighborhood is a 5-10 minute walk from the retail portion.

I would never live anywhere again where I couldn't walk to a wide variety of things (in my prior neighborhood, a standard beige subdivision, I had to get in the car for at least 10 minutes for any single thing). Here I can walk to almost anything (could walk to grocery store too, but would be 20 minutes), but I also get the excellent public schools of the suburbs, and new construction.
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Old 10-25-2007, 05:38 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
bradburn1: Other than the charter school, are there any public schools in your neighborhood? Or are the kids bused out? Do you use the dentist, or do you have a different one somewhere else? Do you use the childcare center? (Assuming you have children) I am just curious about how a "new urbanist" neighborhood actually works in real life.
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