U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-08-2007, 05:04 AM
 
Location: New York
2,731 posts, read 2,828,143 times
Reputation: 830

Advertisements

I have looked up daily averages in both cities, and have consistently looked to see what the weather was in Denver on a regular basis.

I have concluded that temperature wise, the cities are similar. However, I can't really account for the arid nature of Denver and no amount of data gathering is going to substitute for actually living some where.

So can any transplants guide me as to what the weather feels like?

IN NY
I hate the dead of winter, especially when it is windy. Especially when we go a few weeks where the temperature is below 20.
I hate the dead of summer, especiall when it is humid. And there is never a breeze in the summer.

But I do like the 4 seasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-09-2007, 06:48 AM
 
8 posts, read 35,795 times
Reputation: 10
Denver has lots of sunshine in the winter, also cold temps and lots of snow.
It's dryer that NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2007, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Castle Rock, CO
260 posts, read 1,330,271 times
Reputation: 95
The summers in Colorado will 'feel' a lot less oppressive. The Winters may include more snow, but the amount of sunshine (in CO) makes it feel a lot warmer than the temperature would indicate. CO also has a lot of wind ("annoying wind", my wife call it) ... but it comes and goes. Some areas near the foothills are windier (on avg) that other places. There are gusts of wind in CO that can be quite strong.

The lack of humidity is hard on your skin and growing things much harder in CO.

We have 4 seasons here, but sometimes Fall ends rather abruptly, if an early snowstorm hits us in Sep or Oct. This year, most of the front range has escaped this ... so our Fall has been rather nice. In CR, I had 10" of snow, so my leaves dropped almost a month ago. Down in old town CR, there are still leaves, because they had less snow there.

So I've heard people from East say how the Fall colors are not as spectacular here ... party because there is WAY less vegetation and also because we can get snowstorms that sometimes drop on trees with leaves still on them ... and the result can be lots of broken branches and early occurance of dropped leaves.

Overall, I prefer it here, but its a personal preference. I've never known much else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2007, 02:49 PM
 
1,267 posts, read 3,031,407 times
Reputation: 191
denver's in the high desert plains. intense sunshine much of the time (so often feels warmer in the sunshine even with similar temperature..except when accounting for humidity in the summer, maybe), far less precipitation in denver (and when it snows, which isn't TERRIBLY often, it doesn't stick around for long due in part to the intense sunshine and low humidity), denver can *occasionally* be VERY windy (chinooks, mountain waves, etc), thunderstorms/tornados around denver can be intense but relatively shortlived, denver never sees remnants of hurricanes or noreasters, NY's more cloudy, denver's seasons are more like summer and winter with sort of transitions that oscillate between the two (unlike more extensive eastern spring and fall) ... they're rather different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2007, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,312 posts, read 6,901,514 times
Reputation: 710
http://www.city-data.com/forum/denve...er-thread.html Good place to get some information from.

Cold in Colorado is different than cold on the east coast. We don't have the humidity and you will reasonably see a few people in shorts when the sun is shining and the temps are in the 30s. When it's in the 80s and 90s here, you can actually be out in it and not feel like you've not showered after a shower. As for the snow, we actually don't get a heck of a lot on the Front Range. When we do, it melts pretty dang quickly.

Anyhow, check out that thread. Lots of good information there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2007, 08:16 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,511,574 times
Reputation: 6928
I have lived and worked in NYC and the big difference for me:

In the winter, you can see clean snow on the ground in Denver. In NYC, the snow becomes dirty and grimy immediately.

In Denver, you can enjoy the quiet as the city slows down during a heavy snowfall. NYC is never quiet.

After a rain in Denver, the air smells fresh and soon the streets are dry. In NYC the air takes the smells of the buildings, the cars, the garbage and all the people and it stays wet for a a long humid, and odorous time.

In Denver, you can somtimes catch a breeze from over the mountains. In NYC you can catch a breeze and depending on the area, it can smell good like the ocean or bad from Jersey.

In Denver you can feel the sun in most areas. In NYC, many more streets are in the shadows from the tall buildings and the sun never shines.

In Denver a low temp can be warm, the same temp in NYC is cold. In Denver a high temp can be very comfortable, , the same temp in NYC will be humidly uncomfortable.

During Lunch time on a hot summer day, in Denver downtown, people walk around. In NYC at the same time, people stay indoors and order food in or go quickly indoors to a restaurant.

NYC can be described as sticky in the summer, miserable in the winter, inviting but rainy in the spring, cold and damp in the fall. There are many areas of NYC with some difference, and people do love it---more live there than anywhere else, in this country, and many never leave.

Denver can be described as warm and comfortable in the summer, mostly comfortable in the winter, springs are pleasant and mostly dry, fall is also pleasant and dry. There are many areas of Denver with differences and people do love it.

Denver is not loved by as many people as NYC---maybe misery loves company or it really is so great--that they named it twice---New York, New York.

I love New York. I love Denver. New York is the city of my birth and the love of my youth; Denver is my long term spouse.

Livecontent
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2007, 02:30 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,853,550 times
Reputation: 13244
I moved to Denver as a middle schooler, from Long Island.
I think the change I noticed the most was the variance of temperatures: the nights would be so cool that I would dress warmly for my walk to school.
Then I would roast on the way home! I learned about dressing in layers.
I also had a bit of a shock with the altitude; I had regular nosebleeds the first year, then adjusted.
IMHO, Denver summers can be like a furnace. But summer nights are lovely.
Cold temps do not feel nearly as cold in Denver as elsewhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Denver Colorado
385 posts, read 1,445,668 times
Reputation: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I have lived and worked in NYC and the big difference for me:

In the winter, you can see clean snow on the ground in Denver. In NYC, the snow becomes dirty and grimy immediately.

In Denver, you can enjoy the quiet as the city slows down during a heavy snowfall. NYC is never quiet.

After a rain in Denver, the air smells fresh and soon the streets are dry. In NYC the air takes the smells of the buildings, the cars, the garbage and all the people and it stays wet for a a long humid, and odorous time.

In Denver, you can somtimes catch a breeze from over the mountains. In NYC you can catch a breeze and depending on the area, it can smell good like the ocean or bad from Jersey.

In Denver you can feel the sun in most areas. In NYC, many more streets are in the shadows from the tall buildings and the sun never shines.

In Denver a low temp can be warm, the same temp in NYC is cold. In Denver a high temp can be very comfortable, , the same temp in NYC will be humidly uncomfortable.

During Lunch time on a hot summer day, in Denver downtown, people walk around. In NYC at the same time, people stay indoors and order food in or go quickly indoors to a restaurant.

NYC can be described as sticky in the summer, miserable in the winter, inviting but rainy in the spring, cold and damp in the fall. There are many areas of NYC with some difference, and people do love it---more live there than anywhere else, in this country, and many never leave.

Denver can be described as warm and comfortable in the summer, mostly comfortable in the winter, springs are pleasant and mostly dry, fall is also pleasant and dry. There are many areas of Denver with differences and people do love it.

Denver is not loved by as many people as NYC---maybe misery loves company or it really is so great--that they named it twice---New York, New York.

I love New York. I love Denver. New York is the city of my birth and the love of my youth; Denver is my long term spouse.

Livecontent
Very enjoyable post, livecontent. Well said.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2007, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Westminster, CO
271 posts, read 1,251,135 times
Reputation: 91
Livecontent said it best.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2007, 10:09 AM
 
Location: New York
2,731 posts, read 2,828,143 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I love New York. I love Denver. New York is the city of my birth and the love of my youth; Denver is my long term spouse.

Livecontent
Excellent post. Sounds like Denver weather is an improvement based upon the fact that I agree with your assessments of NYC weather.

And nothing like wearing a light sweater on an early fall day when you are in the shade, and then Oila, step across the street, and now you are roasting. (NYC downtown)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top