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Old 12-29-2013, 06:59 AM
 
532 posts, read 910,212 times
Reputation: 619

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It's kind of interesting that in three or four days, recreational marijuana will be for sale in Denver. As a person in a lot of pain living in a conservative state where this will probably never happen, I wish I were there. My questions are:
  1. Do you think that this change in the law will have a positive effect on the economy;
  2. Do you think the population of Denver will rise, due to people moving there for this reason;
  3. Will this increase drug addiction (the old notion that marijuana is a gateway drug);
  4. Will this cause more drug-related auto accidents;
  5. Will this free up law enforcement from dealing with people for minor infractions, and thus the major legal infractions will get more attention. [My understanding is that people who are currently incarcerated for minor infractions will not be released because the law at the time they were arrested, is controlling; nobody gets grandfathered out of jail];
  6. Will this have a negative or positive effect on young people;
  7. If this works--and I'm betting it will--will Colorado not be a test state, a model for other states that may put this into law? [And if so, which states might be next? Certainly not Texas!! :-( ]
I'm very curious what people who currently live there think.
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Old 12-29-2013, 07:13 AM
 
532 posts, read 910,212 times
Reputation: 619
I would add this, too. I designed a Facebook page, just to subscribe to all the marijuana-related pages in Denver that I could locate (and yoga, Aikido and a few other subjects)--in order to try to stay on top of the subject and learn as much as possible, what was going on.

What I have noticed is that a lot of marijuana pages have imagery which does not appeal to me, at all (same with magazines); that is, the graphics seem to be mostly kind of vulgar (for lack of a less obnoxious way to say it). Pictures of scantily dressed girls, motorcycles--the whole Harley-Davidson package of imagery which has pretty much nothing to do with my interests and inclinations.

My feelings on the use of marijuana, or the psychological states it puts me in, are more attuned to aesthetics, spiritual matters, depth of character...just not what I'm seeing. This troubles me.

Does that make sense? I really don't relate to what many people would refer to as the objectification of women, and all that other imagery which does not appeal to me. [I would add that anyone who likes this has an absolute right to this sort of imagery/graphics, and I'm not for an instant disputing that. My point is, it just doesn't appeal to *me*.]

Anybody else???

Last edited by jtaustin; 12-29-2013 at 07:24 AM..
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Old 12-29-2013, 08:40 AM
 
51 posts, read 68,016 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
It's kind of interesting that in three or four days, recreational marijuana will be for sale in Denver. As a person in a lot of pain living in a conservative state where this will probably never happen, I wish I were there. My questions are:
  1. Do you think that this change in the law will have a positive effect on the economy;
  2. Do you think the population of Denver will rise, due to people moving there for this reason;
  3. Will this increase drug addiction (the old notion that marijuana is a gateway drug);
  4. Will this cause more drug-related auto accidents;
  5. Will this free up law enforcement from dealing with people for minor infractions, and thus the major legal infractions will get more attention. [My understanding is that people who are currently incarcerated for minor infractions will not be released because the law at the time they were arrested, is controlling; nobody gets grandfathered out of jail];
  6. Will this have a negative or positive effect on young people;
  7. If this works--and I'm betting it will--will Colorado not be a test state, a model for other states that may put this into law? [And if so, which states might be next? Certainly not Texas!! :-( ]
I'm very curious what people who currently live there think.
Do some google searches on how the Netherlands was affected when it was legalized there years and years ago.

Have a look over on craigslist "resumes". You'll find some pretty funny ads for people looking for Professional Grower positions. Most of them live in other states, and are hoping to land their dream job before moving here.

I personally don't care for the stuff, but don't care if other people enjoy it. Just not in my house....
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Old 12-29-2013, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Greenwood Village Colorado
324 posts, read 536,998 times
Reputation: 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
It's kind of interesting that in three or four days, recreational marijuana will be for sale in Denver. As a person in a lot of pain living in a conservative state where this will probably never happen, I wish I were there. My questions are:
  1. Do you think that this change in the law will have a positive effect on the economy;
  2. Do you think the population of Denver will rise, due to people moving there for this reason;
  3. Will this increase drug addiction (the old notion that marijuana is a gateway drug);
  4. Will this cause more drug-related auto accidents;
  5. Will this free up law enforcement from dealing with people for minor infractions, and thus the major legal infractions will get more attention. [My understanding is that people who are currently incarcerated for minor infractions will not be released because the law at the time they were arrested, is controlling; nobody gets grandfathered out of jail];
  6. Will this have a negative or positive effect on young people;
  7. If this works--and I'm betting it will--will Colorado not be a test state, a model for other states that may put this into law? [And if so, which states might be next? Certainly not Texas!! :-( ]
I'm very curious what people who currently live there think.

1. yes
2. yes
3. no
4. yes
5. yes
6. negative
7. no idea
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Old 12-29-2013, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,113 posts, read 4,913,380 times
Reputation: 5434
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
It's kind of interesting that in three or four days, recreational marijuana will be for sale in Denver. As a person in a lot of pain living in a conservative state where this will probably never happen, I wish I were there. My questions are:

1. Do you think that this change in the law will have a positive effect on the economy;
It depends. The economy for marijuana will be somewhat above the table instead of under the table. This will result in a tax boon for the state. Whether those taxes will outweigh the costs of regulating and enforcing laws regarding the selling of marijuana remains to be seen.
2. Do you think the population of Denver will rise, due to people moving there for this reason;
Maybe. While the legal sales of marijuana may act as a pull factor to some migrants bringing more people into the state, the problems that it will cause will be a push factor for others to leave the state. I don't think the law will prompt the occasional marijuana user to move here, if anything, it will attract the hard core, get stoned all the time user. That is not good.
3. Will this increase drug addiction (the old notion that marijuana is a gateway drug);
Probably. But not so much because of the gateway notion. More because it is possible to get addicted to marijuana. The percentage will be the same, but the number of users will increase.
4. Will this cause more drug-related auto accidents;
See above. The percentage will probably be similar, but the raw number will rise. It won't rise significantly though. I am wondering if it will cause more accidents among rental car users as pot tourists come to town and party up.

It will lead to a rise in DWIs. This is mostly because the law prompted the legislature to set a blood limit regarding the amount of THC a person can have in his/her system while driving. Before, it was harder for prosecutors to prove impaired driving. Now, a blood test determines whether or not a person is impaired.
5. Will this free up law enforcement from dealing with people for minor infractions, and thus the major legal infractions will get more attention. [My understanding is that people who are currently incarcerated for minor infractions will not be released because the law at the time they were arrested, is controlling; nobody gets grandfathered out of jail];
Kind of. Major legal proceedings for marijuana will go down. The number of tickets for drug infractions will go up (smoking in a public place, etc.), as will the number of DWIs.
6. Will this have a negative or positive effect on young people;
Negative. As a high school teacher, this worries me the most. More kids are starting to smoke marijuana. In a nationwide study, researchers found that 6.5% of HS seniors use pot daily and 25% had used pot in the past month. The percentage of tenth graders using pot in the last month was up to 18% and the number of 8th graders using pot in the past month was 12%. Drug suspensions and expulsions are up in Colorado schools, but the numbers due to marijuana were not singled out until last year. We will have to wait to see what the trend is. The reason marijuana was singled out though is because anecdotal evidence from schools suggested that more kids are being disciplined by schools for marijuana then ever before.
7. If this works--and I'm betting it will--will Colorado not be a test state, a model for other states that may put this into law? [And if so, which states might be next? Certainly not Texas!! :-( ]
Like all pioneer laws, what works in theory may or may not work as well in practice. A good example is the Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) which Colorado passed in 1992. Despite the number of people and groups across the country who believe that this is an excellent law limiting tax increases, no other state has enacted it.

The problem with this law in Colorado is that it is an amendment to the state constitution. It cannot be changed without another constitutional amendment. There are things that will cause problems and need to be tweaked, but the legislature cannot do that. Only another amendment can change the status quo. This is true for both the detractors and the advocates of the law. For example: the prohibition of using marijuana "openly and publicly" is written into the amendment.

Limits to the amount of marijuana a person can possess (1 oz) are part of the law as are limits a person can buy at one time. The law protects the right of employers to fire employees for positive drug tests (already has happened), and protects the right of private property owners (landlords, hotels, etc.) to prohibit use on their properties. With the talk of pot tourism, the big question is where will these people smoke? Hotels don't want the smoke and smell in their rooms and tourists cannot consume marijuana openly and publicly.

Other states looking to do this would be wise to wait and see how all this shakes out. Maybe it will work. Maybe it will be like TABOR, a law that is theoretically desirable but practically unfeasible.
I'm very curious what people who currently live there think.
You will likely get many of the pro-marijuana crowd accusing me of "reefer madness" because I suggest that something could possibly be negative about the wonder weed that cures disease (I never said it didn't, and I supported medical marijuana), and that it is better than alcohol (probably is, but that doesn't make it good for you). You asked what I thought, and this is my take on the situation. I don't engage the pro-pot crowd anymore because to them marijuana is the plant world's Jesus. It's perfect, and no argument you can put forth will ever sway them.
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Old 12-29-2013, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,113 posts, read 4,913,380 times
Reputation: 5434
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
I designed a Facebook page, just to subscribe to all the marijuana-related pages in Denver that I could locate...in order to try to stay on top of the subject and learn as much as possible, what was going on.
The Denver Post now has a marijuana section and a marijuana editor.

Keep up with the latest marijuana news here.
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Old 12-29-2013, 09:59 AM
 
532 posts, read 910,212 times
Reputation: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
You will likely get many of the pro-marijuana crowd accusing me of "reefer madness" because I suggest that something could possibly be negative about the wonder weed that cures disease (I never said it didn't, and I supported medical marijuana), and that it is better than alcohol (probably is, but that doesn't make it good for you). You asked what I thought, and this is my take on the situation. I don't engage the pro-pot crowd anymore because to them marijuana is the plant world's Jesus. It's perfect, and no argument you can put forth will ever sway them.
I'm more or less addicted to the (Bertrand Russell) notion of "disinterested inquiry" -- in other words, that the truth has an intrinsic value all its own and one should pursue the truth, even if (perhaps especially if?) it contradicts one's most cherished values. This, of course, annoys a lot of people who have already made up their minds about some issue or issues, and refuse to listen to any evidence which might contradict their conclusions.

I'm also waiting for a response to my second post, where someone accuses me of snobbery. Frequently, if you use multi-syllabic, million dollar words, or mention art or classical music, or even use (or try to use, in my case) correct grammar or good sentence construction, some people may accuse you of being "snobby" (which, BTW, is not even a word).

This, I believe, is a mistake--to automatically assume someone is a snob based on these few quick-button characteristics. True snobbery, in my opinion (and I have extensive, long term experience with snobs) usually comes from someone who has only recently moved up the food chain from middle- or lower middle-class status, and is (over-) sensitive about it. Give it a generation or two, and wealthy people are usually not snobbish. They don't have to be.
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,968 posts, read 6,581,847 times
Reputation: 7521
There will be a short gold rush. Many other states are waiting to see how this works out. Think legalized gambling. Colorado was an early adopter in 1991. When we legalized gaming Nevada, Atlantic City, and Deadwood were the only other markets allowing gaming in the country. It was not long after that everything started opening up.

It's going to be interesting to see how this plays, but it is my suspicion that in a few years there will be a lot more states opening up. Just look at how many already have approved medical. When that happens, Colorado will have a severely over-built production capacity because right now we are building to accommodate a good chunk of the country's population.

As for your "waiting for someone to accuse me of snobbery" bit, sounds like you are building a strawman.
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:51 AM
 
2,521 posts, read 3,514,952 times
Reputation: 5081
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
It's kind of interesting that in three or four days, recreational marijuana will be for sale in Denver. As a person in a lot of pain living in a conservative state where this will probably never happen, I wish I were there. My questions are:
  1. Do you think that this change in the law will have a positive effect on the economy;
  2. Do you think the population of Denver will rise, due to people moving there for this reason;
  3. Will this increase drug addiction (the old notion that marijuana is a gateway drug);
  4. Will this cause more drug-related auto accidents;
  5. Will this free up law enforcement from dealing with people for minor infractions, and thus the major legal infractions will get more attention. [My understanding is that people who are currently incarcerated for minor infractions will not be released because the law at the time they were arrested, is controlling; nobody gets grandfathered out of jail];
  6. Will this have a negative or positive effect on young people;
  7. If this works--and I'm betting it will--will Colorado not be a test state, a model for other states that may put this into law? [And if so, which states might be next? Certainly not Texas!! :-( ]
I'm very curious what people who currently live there think.
I voted for medical and against recreational. I think it is important to state ones biases up front. I wish I was in a state that did not pass this law.

1. I think it might have a positive effect short term because of tourists but long term will have a negative effect due to attracting those who won't or can't work.

2. I think we are rising for other reasons and it will be extremely difficult to see if there is any net rise due to the recreational use vs. those leaving because quality of life has gone down due to recreational use.

3. Yes drug addiction will increase. While there are some who likely will only ever use pot there are probably more that will go on to other drugs or are there already and will think were tolerant of that also.

4. Yes drug related traffic accidents will increase. More users = more users driving.

5. No because I don't think the police pay attention to minor marijuana infractions now. I think we will get more overall crime due to the element the law attracts and those committing crime to get drug money. I think there should be a tax on the sale of recreational pot that goes directly to increasing law enforcement.

6. Negative.

7. Colorado will of course be a test state. How it all shakes out will likely influence what other states do. I think it is unfortunate that we are the test state.
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Old 12-29-2013, 11:03 AM
 
532 posts, read 910,212 times
Reputation: 619
I have another question, as well: why did this happen in Colorado, and not (say), New Mexico? Colorado is so cold, and so expensive!!
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