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Old 01-10-2008, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Canton, Ga
14 posts, read 52,464 times
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I was told recently that Denver is going through a water shortage and have become really strict on certain things, like recycling and the amount of water you can use. Is this true?
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Old 01-10-2008, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,221,211 times
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Not that I know of. There were no unusual water restrictions last summer and they're saying that snowpack in the mountains right now is well above average - and that's where we get our water from.

Being in an arid climate, I try to always conserve water. Most of my landscaping is xeriscaped and a small amount of grass.
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Old 01-10-2008, 02:46 PM
 
1,267 posts, read 3,032,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlehster View Post
I was told recently that Denver is going through a water shortage and have become really strict on certain things, like recycling and the amount of water you can use. Is this true?
the last decade or so has been considered relatively dry for much of colorado and the southwest, though we get the occasional very wet couple of months. also, there is sometimes talk of "where will denver get it's water over the long haul as water resources such as the draining aquifers, such as the ogallala (under much of the midwest including the eastern edge of colorado), and the draining big reservoirs - similar to what is seen in lake meade or lake powell which are very, very low now - become limited in this high desert that is filling with people using lots of water and other resources?" or "what will climate change have to do with it?". maybe some of that is what you may have heard a bit about?
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Old 01-10-2008, 02:59 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,742,357 times
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There's a whole thread on this topic:

Colorado and the West is running out of water . . .

There is a water shortage in Denver because we live in a dry climate. That does occasionally lead to watering restrictions on when you can water your lawn (lawn watering takes up by far the most water of residential use).

Some municipal water suppliers have much more secure long-term supplies than others. By far the best supplied is Denver Water, which serves the city of Denver and some suburban areas. Other communities that have been around for a long time and are stable in growth (i.e., Boulder, Fort Collins) are quite secure in their water supplies as well. On the other hand, many suburban areas, particularly newer ones, are quite insecure in their water supplies and rely heavily on non-renewable water resources.
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Old 01-10-2008, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Denver,Co
676 posts, read 2,538,825 times
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I believe the city of Aurora has started construction of a new resivoire. The first one in fourty years I believe it is and it is supposed to secure the city's water supply since it always seems to be strapped for water right around aug.
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:23 PM
 
619 posts, read 1,956,512 times
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Trying not to restart an old thread, but...

does anyone know where I might find out whether or not a suburb is part of the Denver water supply? I've been to the Denver water supply website and the only map I could find was rather impossible to read.

specifically, is Littleton part of the Denver supply? is Highlands Ranch?

TIA!
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:35 AM
 
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That's a complicated question, because the metro area is a patchwork quilt of water suppliers. Denver water does directly service some suburban customers, and supplies water to some other water districts who then deliver the service infrastructure to their clients. Many other water districts, however, are not customers of Denver water.

To answer your question, it appears that the city of Littleton itself is directly supplied by Denver water. Highlands Ranch is part of an independent water district: Centennial Water & Sanitation District.
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,892 posts, read 102,319,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mczabe View Post
Trying not to restart an old thread, but...

does anyone know where I might find out whether or not a suburb is part of the Denver water supply? I've been to the Denver water supply website and the only map I could find was rather impossible to read.

specifically, is Littleton part of the Denver supply? is Highlands Ranch?

TIA!
Call the City government (in the case of Littleton) or the County govt (in the case of Highlands Ranch). You may need specific addresses.
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Old 06-14-2008, 10:14 AM
 
619 posts, read 1,956,512 times
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Thanks! I've heard that the Denver Water Supply (proper) is well-supported, but that the outlying areas may run into difficulties. ??? I don't want to invest in a property only to feel dumb and be SOL when there's no water in 10-15 years.
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Old 06-14-2008, 05:23 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,785,875 times
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Not to rehash, but most of Douglas County, especially the "exurban" areas on wells are going to be in serious trouble within 10-25 years. Those areas are largely reliant on water from the Denver Basin acquifer, which is now depleting rapidly. You can thank out-of-control growth for that. I actually grew up on Denver Basin water. In the 1960's, it was estimated that the Denver Basin Acquifer had at least a 400-year supply of water. So much for that pipedream.
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