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Old 01-29-2008, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,348 posts, read 3,224,516 times
Reputation: 1303

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Quote:
Originally Posted by .gif View Post
it's only a good point if you agree with it. this is all personal preference. maybe since i grew up in the east, it feels more comfortable to me. i think the great smoky mountains are more majestic than the rockies. the mountain views are nice out here, but to me the landscape out east is much more beautiful. i can see how someone else would have the opposite view. i get the impression that the original poster is someone whose preference might be closer to mine.
Absolutely, the answers are purely subjective to each poster. There is no doubt the drive along I-80 in PA is beautiful (I would've mistaken it for a rainforest - the greenery is almost overwhelming), but much of the east, including the DC area, looks the same (or similar, since I know people like to argue if you point out that something "is the same"). It's just green and rolling. I get bored with it in a week.

I'll take my views with some drama. The sight of alpenglow - an optical illusion created by the rising sun in which the mountains to the west of Denver appear pink or purple - on a crisp and clear winter morning after a mountain snowfall is witnessed probably more frequently in Denver than any other major city in the United States (it happens almost every morning if one pays attention). You will never see anything like it east of Colorado (including DC). The sunsets over the mountains rival the sunsets anywhere on earth, especially when the sky is filled with whispy altocumulus cloud formations (Cloud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) that will steal your breath away.

It doesn't take someone who's "into" the mountains (i.e. skiers, hikers, etc.) to appreciate the beauty the mountains provide. I know many people who don't relish that lifestyle, but none of them deny how lucky we are to live in a place that is so beautifully dramatic. The mountains take on their own personality every day; just in the way the sun hits them or the way the clouds stroll across the sky above them or the way the wind billows the snow off the 14,000-foot peaks of Mt. Evans and Longs Peak against a searing blue backdrop. It's like nowhere else. It doesn't compare.
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Old 01-29-2008, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Denver
274 posts, read 1,362,471 times
Reputation: 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by .gif View Post
one thing to keep in mind about DenverAztec's pictures... these are isolated sections with trees and they are the exception, not the norm. the vast majority of the landscape around denver looks like this:

I just want to mention that one of the nice aspects of Denver is that both the areas shown here by .gif as well as these:

Arvada (Photo by Averie-Jay)
http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/dd60/PhotogAJ/Olde%20Towne%20Arvada%20and%20Broomfield/OldTowneArvadaBroomfield027.jpg (broken link)

Capitol Hill Area (Photo by DenverAztec)


And a couple I took, one in the suburb of Englewood and the other in the Denver Baker neighborhood.
Englewood


Baker


are accurate reflections Denver and the metro area. I disagree with the statement that the areas with trees are "isolated"; a very good portion of the city of Denver and some of the older suburbs have lots of large mature trees. And there are lots of different types of neighborhoods to choose from in differenty price ranges where trees are abundant.

It is a valid point and important for people to realize however, that outside of the metro area there will be very few trees unless you are in the mountains.

This discussion is kind of funny to me because where I am from originally (Clovis, NM) is much like the eastern side of Colorado with very few trees. The first time I came to Denver, I think it was about 1978 or so, we drove down Monaco Parkway and I couldn't believe the tree canopy and how green everything was. Sort of depends on your relative previous experiences on how "green" Denver seems.

I guess the my point is this -- Denver is fortunate to get enough rainfall to sustain trees that have been planted by man. It is also fortunate to have open spaces and beautiful mountain vistas. Some people prefer to have wide open views, some people love to have lots of green... you can have either in the Denver area (at least during the warmer months) depending on where you choose to live.

Last edited by MobyLL; 01-29-2008 at 05:52 PM..
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Old 01-29-2008, 05:53 PM
 
303 posts, read 1,417,220 times
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DC actually has some great sunsets, it is one of the things that I miss! In the summer you get brilliant colored clouds all over the sky, esp after some afternoon convection. In winter the sun sometimes turns solid red, like a big rubber ball, and sinks through the trees - another favorite of mine. I think I live too close to the mountains here to get a nice sunset, the clouds almost always just turn dark very quickly with no coloration.

I'm with .gif on the eastern scenery being more appealing, imho. The western mountains are certainly majestic, but I find them cold (emotionally, not referring to snow/temperatures). I am reminded of some lyrics from "Long Way" by Antje Duvekot:

'... people have got lost up there
In the home of the grizzly bear
And you can ask the mountain
But the mountain doesn't care'

Ah, now I get to go and daydream about moving back to DC....trees, asian food, and frolicking on the water will feature prominently
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Old 01-29-2008, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,348 posts, read 3,224,516 times
Reputation: 1303
To each his own, absolutely. The green in DC (and most of the east, for that matter) is stunning and completely the opposite of Denver and the majority of the state of Colorado, however, as others have noted, there are areas in Denver where greenery is quite impressive (though not on the scale of DC). The Capitol Hill district has gorgeous huge trees lining every street - it would not at all be out of place if it were transplanted on the east coast. Other established areas are similar.
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Old 01-29-2008, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Denver
274 posts, read 1,362,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nelumbo View Post
I'm with .gif on the eastern scenery being more appealing, imho.

Ah, now I get to go and daydream about moving back to DC....trees, asian food, and frolicking on the water will feature prominently
Very valid opinion, everyone has differing perspectives and personal preferences. Personally I also love the NE and there are many great things about the area. DC is the one city I don't like along the East Coast, but that is due to my own peculiarities and not with the city per se.
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Old 01-29-2008, 10:13 PM
 
1,176 posts, read 4,036,916 times
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There is quite a bit of good asian on Federal south of Alameda in Denver.

As someone who spends a fair amount of time around and eastof IAD I can do without the ice, the humidity and the traffic D.C. has to offer.
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Old 01-30-2008, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 82,847,374 times
Reputation: 17501
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelumbo View Post
great sunsets,
brilliant colored clouds
red winter sun like a ball eastern scenery being more appealing,.
trees,
asian food
frolicking on the water
I understand that these are valid reasons but these are reasons 576, 873, 911, 1013, 1345 on my list of priorities for deciding on a place to live.
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Old 01-30-2008, 12:38 PM
 
303 posts, read 1,417,220 times
Reputation: 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveindenver View Post
There is quite a bit of good asian on Federal south of Alameda in Denver.
Yes, I've been to one or two decent asian places in Denver, but I live far enough away that casual dining, esp in the southern half of Denver, isn't something I do often. I'd probably like living in urban Denver more than Boulder, but I have a very strong desire to live within walking distance of my job.

Charles, sunsets/clouds are nowhere near the top of my priorities list, but trees, high humidity (love it!), minimal snowfall, and asian food are easily in my top 20 if not top 10. Water activities are not so high up; but a lot of the positives about Denver are at the bottom of my priority list (mountains, scenic vistas, skiing, professional sports, mexican food). Clearly this is why I have a preference for DC over Denver, while you prefer Denver to DC
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Old 01-30-2008, 12:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,900 posts, read 102,364,631 times
Reputation: 32962
I think we can post all the pictures in the world to "prove" that Denver has a lot of trees, but the reality is, nothing can compare, tree-wise, to the eastern cities built in the midst of hardwood forests, e.g., Pittsburgh, DC, Baltimore, Atlanta, etc. I never cease to be amazed when I see Pittsburgh. I forget just how many trees there are in that area. My husband, from Nebraska, and my kids, from here in Colorado, find it claustrophobic.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-30-2008 at 12:43 PM.. Reason: found the right word!
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Old 01-30-2008, 02:42 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,745,815 times
Reputation: 1462
Quote:
Originally Posted by .gif View Post
one thing to keep in mind about DenverAztec's pictures... these are isolated sections with trees and they are the exception, not the norm. the vast majority of the landscape around denver looks like this:
I have to disagree with this statement. Actually, I think Denveraztec's pictures are pretty representative of Denver (the city). True, Denveraztec did have a bit of an artistic bent in showing the flowers, etc, but the fact is that most neighborhoods in Denver have a mature tree canopy cared for by city foresters and arborists. Not everywhere, certainly, but that's characteristic of the majority of the city, even the newer parts in southeast Denver.

.gif might have been referring to the metro area at large, possibly. I noticed neither of his pics were anywhere near Denver. Certainly, with the patchwork quilt of jurisdictions we have, not every suburb can live up to the city of Denver's standards when it comes to parks or streetscape (though many do.) But, no fair blaming Denver just because some of the suburbs can't or won't follow Denver's example.
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