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Old 06-15-2016, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Houston
199 posts, read 134,650 times
Reputation: 240

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Recent CO Transplant View Post
well, we moved here about 8 months ago. Renting in Douglas County (HR) until we really feel sure where we want to reside permanently. I can tell you that our situation has nothing to do with the local jobs. I work remote. And that's happening more and more these days.

Look at it this way. We are from Houston. If all your family was in Texas and you didn't want to be there anymore, where can you go that is roughly a 2hr flight radius that is better? Denver is the easy winner. My wage is not tied to the local economy, we have 20x more things to do outside and aren't forced inside due to the heat, humidity, and mosquitoes...You think violent crime is rough here? Traffic is bad? lol

Anyway, Denver metro isn't perfect, but it beats a ton of other places. I can literally work anywhere I want and we chose here because it was a good location, relatively affordable (although there has been a recent run up), and there are different places to reside for different situations. If you're a hipster dink, plenty of choices. If you're a family man looking to raise his family in a bubble and enjoy the outdoors like me, plenty of choices.

My company is based in silicon valley and I damn sure wouldn't live anywhere near that place. People are renting out closet space. It's ridiculous.
Howdy. We moved up here from Houston about six months ago for some of the reasons you moved, especially that part about being forced inside. We were perfectly fine with our jobs in Houston, but we wanted to make the move for the better weather and outdoor activities. In fact, I was riding my motorcycle in to work this morning and couldn't believe how beautiful it was and how great the temperature was given that we're in the middle of June.

We are also renting until we determine our next step.
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Old 06-15-2016, 08:38 AM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,259 posts, read 8,040,413 times
Reputation: 8908
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Clearly a pothead.
Ha! Richard!
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Old 06-15-2016, 09:09 AM
 
5,444 posts, read 4,816,004 times
Reputation: 15020
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post

Yeah, but Trinidad is lacking in a lot of areas. Namely: name recognition, population, public transportation, microbreweries, guys with Blackmon beards, an airport to go back home to Iowa, jobs, higher higher education, etc.

Burlington, Wellington, Julesburg, and Fruita need to step up their games too.

Ha!! I agree with you, but if someone is truly moving to Colorado strictly because of the pot as a lot of people on here seem to think, then places like Trinidad (and other smaller towns throughout the state) would also see increases in home prices and rent. After all, you don't have to live in Denver to smoke pot legally.
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Old 06-15-2016, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
1,716 posts, read 1,580,613 times
Reputation: 4125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
For that price, you can find a fairly new 3,500 Sq ft home in Queen Creek, AZ. Suburb of Phoenix.

I wouldn't purchase that home, rip off.
But who wants to live there? You can find lots of great deals in the South or the Flyover states, but they simply aren't desirable places to live for a variety of reasons. What makes it a "rip off"? Is it because you can't afford it? It is priced appropriately for the market....a vastly different market than AZ.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousMiscer View Post
All my neighbors and myself are feeling it in the pocket-book, our rents have gone up year after year. Ours is currently a little over $1400 a month in a creaky and aging early-70's era complex. It's up from $900 a month in 2010.

Oh and the people earlier who claimed the prices are "fine" and such must not be natives or are from richer areas of the country. I guess to a wealthy Californian who is used to paying $2500 a month for an apartment, $1500 a month is "cheap" and "a steal"
$1400 for rent is a bargain in a desirable city in 2016. Here in Seattle that same apartment might be $2000.

I am a Colorado native that left 3 years ago and think prices are "fine", hence your theory is disproved. You have the choice to lower your housing costs by moving to a less desirable location, or bettering yourself so that the percentage of your income going to housing is lowered. Perhaps the MJ you blame for the problems is related to your inability to get a six figure job?

For me, MJ legalization was an interesting foot note, but the presence or absence didn't play into my decision at all, nor did politics. I left for two reasons; Better job & Environmental decay. The climate had become too warm for me, though that may contribute to more people moving there as winters are way easier now than they were 30+ years ago. The warming contributed to the area being brown for 8-10 months of the year, a lack of water and rapidly deteriorating forests due to beetle kill, a result of less sever winters.
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Old 06-15-2016, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,659 posts, read 2,309,294 times
Reputation: 2657
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
But who wants to live there? You can find lots of great deals in the South or the Flyover states, but they simply aren't desirable places to live for a variety of reasons. What makes it a "rip off"? Is it because you can't afford it? It is priced appropriately for the market....a vastly different market than AZ.



$1400 for rent is a bargain in a desirable city in 2016. Here in Seattle that same apartment might be $2000.

I am a Colorado native that left 3 years ago and think prices are "fine", hence your theory is disproved. You have the choice to lower your housing costs by moving to a less desirable location, or bettering yourself so that the percentage of your income going to housing is lowered. Perhaps the MJ you blame for the problems is related to your inability to get a six figure job?

For me, MJ legalization was an interesting foot note, but the presence or absence didn't play into my decision at all, nor did politics. I left for two reasons; Better job & Environmental decay. The climate had become too warm for me, though that may contribute to more people moving there as winters are way easier now than they were 30+ years ago. The warming contributed to the area being brown for 8-10 months of the year, a lack of water and rapidly deteriorating forests due to beetle kill, a result of less sever winters.
Yes, it's priced appropriately for upper class Californians who are fleeing their over priced, over regulated Democratic state by the government. What they find cheap in Colorado is not cheap to other people who don't want to waste money on inflated prices for a small 1200 sq ft $350k+ 1950s ranch style bungalow in old Lakewood w/ decaying road infrastructure.

Colorado in another 30 years, will surely become a state for the rich and poor, where you have to 'better' yourself with a six figure job just to make ends meet because it's 'hip and cool'. All of it is clearly BS.
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Old 06-15-2016, 10:23 AM
SQL
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 842,873 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
Colorado in another 30 years, will surely become a state for the rich and poor, where you have to 'better' yourself with a six figure job just to make ends meet because it's hip and cool.
Yeah, that's pretty snobby to say that you need a six figure income to live here or anywhere for that matter.
The median household income in Denver is only around $60k; it's less than that for the entire US. And keep in mind that is HOUSEHOLD, meaning everyone who lives in the house. I, alone, make a hair over the median household income, but I feel like I struggle to stay afloat at times. Fortunately, I rent a room out in my condo which relieves me of some of the financial burden. And when my GF eventually moves in, that'll put our household income well over the median household income. Whew, then I guess I will have finally made it.

At any rate, Denver's real estate market is forcing out average, working class folks. Either that, or forcing most people to live with 2-3 other complete strangers they find on Craigslist. I'll tell you how that worked out for my GF later. Apparently it is now a luxury to live by one's self. Most new development is catering to upper middle class and the wealthy. It seems almost everything has the "luxury" tag slapped on it, as this has become the new norm of Denver. Additionally, all the new housing stock that is being built and added to inventory are McMansions. How is it that our family unit is getting smaller, but we suddenly need all this extra space?

But then the argument is go live where prices are cheaper. Where? Housing all over the front range is highly inflated right now. I was just talking to my co-worker about this. They are looking for houses out near Fort Morgan that are going for $300k. FORT MORGAN?!?! What the hell is even in Fort Morgan? You may as well move to Western Kansas. No offense, Kansas. People need to be near where jobs are, and that's Denver. Moving further out is only going to put a higher strain on the environmental resources we have, and it's going to cause traffic to be a bigger mess than it already is.

Here are my suggestions. Build smaller houses. Build more condos and townhomes. Build basic apartments without all the fluff amenities (i.e. door-to-door trash pickup, crappy free wi-fi).

Last edited by SQL; 06-15-2016 at 10:52 AM..
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Old 06-15-2016, 10:30 AM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,259 posts, read 8,040,413 times
Reputation: 8908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
Yes, it's priced appropriately for upper class Californians who are fleeing their over priced, over regulated Democratic state by the government. What they find cheap in Colorado is not cheap to other people who don't want to waste money on inflated prices for a small 1200 sq ft $350k+ 1950s ranch style bungalow in old Lakewood w/ decaying road infrastructure.

Colorado in another 30 years, will surely become a state for the rich and poor, where you have to 'better' yourself with a six figure job just to make ends meet because it's 'hip and cool'. All of it is clearly BS.
You will be in for a real surprise when you see how many Californians are moving to Prescott Valley.

We get it, you don't like it here. Your opinion is just that, your opinion.
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Old 06-15-2016, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,249 posts, read 1,617,396 times
Reputation: 2882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
But who wants to live there? You can find lots of great deals in the South or the Flyover states, but they simply aren't desirable places to live for a variety of reasons. What makes it a "rip off"? Is it because you can't afford it? It is priced appropriately for the market....a vastly different market than AZ.



$1400 for rent is a bargain in a desirable city in 2016. Here in Seattle that same apartment might be $2000.

I am a Colorado native that left 3 years ago and think prices are "fine", hence your theory is disproved. You have the choice to lower your housing costs by moving to a less desirable location, or bettering yourself so that the percentage of your income going to housing is lowered. Perhaps the MJ you blame for the problems is related to your inability to get a six figure job?

For me, MJ legalization was an interesting foot note, but the presence or absence didn't play into my decision at all, nor did politics. I left for two reasons; Better job & Environmental decay. The climate had become too warm for me, though that may contribute to more people moving there as winters are way easier now than they were 30+ years ago. The warming contributed to the area being brown for 8-10 months of the year, a lack of water and rapidly deteriorating forests due to beetle kill, a result of less sever winters.
$2000 for an apartment in a city that is cold and filled with social problems like Seattle no thanks.

Heroin, cocaine users in Seattle may get country

'Frontline' Focus on Seattle Explains America's Heroin Crisis, With a Glimmer of Hope | KCTS 9 - Public Television

I can't understand if Seattle is a city of venture capitalist techies and consultants drinking $10 latte's under $2000 small apartments why they would have issues to the point that out of all the cities with heroin epidemics that Seattle would be chosen for a national documentary.

While Seattle seems like a very clean, sleak modern city. It has constant drizzle and it is cold a majority of the year.

Seattle also has a national reputation of cold, super aloof people. Then again Denver is also becoming a cold, super aloof city on personality.

I love the super-facial materialism of bourgeois cities like San Francisco, Seattle, Portland and Denver. It makes middle-america look even better with it's low housing prices, lack of annoyances and cheap chains with low markups.

What is hillarious is the "let them eat cake" mentality of these ultra-liberal, "progressive" cities. At ground level they have the same chains as every other city and the country is mainly chain retail.

Why would anyone except techie-liberals who get a rise in self-esteem from seeing social issues want to live in a city like this and pay $3500 for a small apartment.
Map shows S.F.’s human poop on the streets - SFGate Blog

I would much rather live in a small university town like Columbia, Missouri or Lincoln, Nebraska and pay $350 a month for an apartment and have all the same chains as an overpriced city has. The only thing these super-exclusive offer is $1000 handbags and 300% markup white-table cloth restaurants with stuffy atmospheres.

I ride the light-rail all the time in Denver and walk in these gentrified neighborhoods and it is amazing how a majority of people are staring at cell-phones or not laptops.

If people are so in shock and awe over these super-progressive, gentrified cities with very high housing prices why are people looking at laptops rather then salivating after passing by restaurants with weird names with 300% markups with uncomfortable seating.

In today's culture where a vast majority of jobs can be done remotely anywhere with internet access and a vast majority of people are looking at cell-phones and laptops a majority of their waking hours it doesn't really make sense to deal with the annoyances of overpriced cities with lots of social annoyances.

Last edited by lovecrowds; 06-15-2016 at 10:59 AM..
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Old 06-15-2016, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,906 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
$2000 for an apartment in a city that is cold and filled with social problems like Seattle no thanks.

Heroin, cocaine users in Seattle may get country

'Frontline' Focus on Seattle Explains America's Heroin Crisis, With a Glimmer of Hope | KCTS 9 - Public Television

I can't understand if Seattle is a city of venture capitalist techies and consultants drinking $10 latte's under $2000 small apartments why they would have issues to the point that out of all the cities with heroin epidemics that Seattle would be chosen for a national documentary.

While Seattle seems like a very clean, sleak modern city. It has constant drizzle and it is cold a majority of the year.

If I want a clean, sleak city, modern city I would mould move to Des Moines or Minneapolis and pay the fraction of the cost of Seattle.

I love the super-facial materialism of bourgeois cities like San Francisco, Seattle, Portland and Denver. It makes middle-america look even better.

What is hillarious is the "let them eat cake" mentality of these ultra-liberal, "progressive" cities. At ground level they have the same chains as every other city and the country is mainly chain retail.

Why would anyone except techie-liberals who get a rise in self-esteem from seeing social issues want to live in a city like this and pay $3500 for a studio.
Map shows S.F.ís human poop on the streets - SFGate Blog

I would much rather live in a small university town like Columbia, Missouri or Lincoln, Nebraska and pay $350 a month for an apartment and have all the same chains as an overpriced city has. The only thing these super-exclusive offer is $1000 handbags and 300% markup white-table cloth restaurants with stuffy atmospheres.
Okay. You should live somewhere you like and not bother other people for living in places they like.
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Old 06-15-2016, 11:06 AM
SQL
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 842,873 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
In today's culture where a vast majority of jobs can be done remotely anywhere with internet access and a vast majority of people are looking at cell-phones and laptops a majority of their waking hours it doesn't really make sense to deal with the annoyances of overpriced cities with lots of social annoyances.
Just because a lot of jobs can be done remotely doesn't mean that most companies allow that sort of flexibility. I've only worked at one company out of five that allowed me to work full-time from home. We're still a few years away (maybe longer) from companies adopting mass WFH policies.

People live near these places for the environment, amenities, and entertainment. Weather, sports, music, festivals, outdoor recreation year round, mass public transit, restaurants, breweries/distilleries.

Des Moines doesn't have much of any of these things and it's hot and humid in the summer. Minneapolis is a cool city, but it has a brutal winter for half the year. And it's also humid in the summer. If the things I mentioned didn't matter much, then people would be flocking to Detroit, where you can get really cheap real estate. At least Detroit has all the major sports teams and some cool music venues.

I agree that Denver's market is highly inflated right now. I think that will continue to fluctuate, as it's mostly a pass through city anyway. People come here and live for a bit, and then they move on to another cool spot or move back home. But let's not try to make it seem like Denver is some terrible place to live. I'd prefer it to almost every other place in the US besides the west coast.
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