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Old 06-24-2016, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,880,574 times
Reputation: 7732

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That problem has been going on since the 1980s. If the Denver Police department hasnít been able to get it under control in the last 30 years, I wouldnít hold my breath they are going to do much about it now.

I suppose itís good that itís finally getting some attention though.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,880,574 times
Reputation: 7732
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousMiscer View Post
Why wasn't it as big a problem 5 years ago then? I see what you're saying, but there's no denying the general uptick in homeless around town is fairly new. 5 or 10 years ago I rarely saw these guys outside of their usual areas such as down-town, Cherry creek, Colfax area, Federal blvd, etc.

But now, these guys are starting to pop up even out here in Littleton/Lakewood/SW corner of Denver. I've even been told by some colleagues that they can now be found loitering on outer edges of Highlands Ranch, which is a fairly nice area.
The homeless problem was bad in the 1980s and 90s when I lived in Denver and getting progressively worse. Iím not sure how much worse itís gotten since I left Denver, but Iím sure it is not a new problem.

It is pretty sad though, because in the 1970s, there was virtually no homeless problem in Denver. You could see them only in small numbers in few isolated areas of Downtown. Anyway Iím pretty sure it has more to do with economic problems, then legalization.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
3,255 posts, read 1,633,586 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyy View Post
Fair enough but how was the economy then?
Back in 1982. Denver had per-capita income 117% of the national average.
In 2001, it was 119% of the national average
In 2014, it was 113% of the national average.

Denver was much better before in my personal opinion and it has actually has lost ground since when it was a cowtown.

It is more economically stable in the past but per-capita income was actually higher in many of those cowtown years then today.

Denver used to be a very, very affordable city with a very, very low barrier of entry to a middle-class life.

Denver now is a very, very expensive city that caters to the elite. It does not offer oppurtunity for working and middle-class masses.

People were renting apartments in Capitol Hill for less then 200/mo in the early 90s.

I paid 435/mo in 2000 for my first apartment with all utilities included in North Capitol Hill which the realtors have rebranded Uptown.

I would gladly trade the Capitol Hill of 2000 with the friendly people, low rent, grit but still safe as opposed to 2016 Capitol Hill with land-rover driving yuppies and Marijuana vagabonds.

Last edited by lovecrowds; 06-24-2016 at 02:50 PM..
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:23 PM
SQL SQL started this thread
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 848,342 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
Back in 1982. Denver had per-capita income 117% of the national average.
In 2001, it was 119% of the national average
In 2014, it was 113% of the national average.

Denver was much better before in my personal opinion and it has actually has lost ground since when it was a cowtown.

It is more economically stable in the past but per-capita income was actually higher in many of those cowtown years then today.

Denver used to be a very, very affordable city with a very, very low barrier of entry to a middle-class life.

Denver now is a very, very expensive city that caters to the elite. It does not offer oppurtunity for working and middle-class masses.

People were renting apartments in Capitol Hill for less then 200/mo in the 90s.

I paid 435/mo in 2000 for my first apartment with all utilities included in North Capitol Hill which the realtors have rebranded Uptown.

I would gladly trade the Capitol Hill of 2000 with the friendly people, low rent, grit but still safe as opposed to 2016 Capitol Hill with land-rover driving yuppies and Marijuana vagabonds.
In 2008, when I moved here, I had a studio in Cap Hill, right outside of downtown. I paid $525/mo. back then. A couple years later, I was splitting a nice 2BR/2BA down the road for about $1000 total. A year later, I lived in Gov's Park, in a 1BR/1BA for $600/mo. It seems that prices really sky rocketed starting 2014 and later.

I would love to go back to those days.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,948 posts, read 6,558,057 times
Reputation: 7437
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
Back in 1982. Denver had per-capita income 117% of the national average.
In 2001, it was 119% of the national average
In 2014, it was 113% of the national average.

Denver was much better before in my personal opinion and it has actually has lost ground since when it was a cowtown.

It is more economically stable in the past but per-capita income was actually higher in many of those cowtown years then today.

Denver used to be a very, very affordable city with a very, very low barrier of entry to a middle-class life.

Denver now is a very, very expensive city that caters to the elite. It does not offer oppurtunity for working and middle-class masses.

People were renting apartments in Capitol Hill for less then 200/mo in the 90s.

I paid 435/mo in 2000 for my first apartment with all utilities included in North Capitol Hill which the realtors have rebranded Uptown.

I would gladly trade the Capitol Hill of 2000 with the friendly people, low rent, grit but still safe as opposed to 2016 Capitol Hill with land-rover driving yuppies and Marijuana vagabonds.
Way to cherry pick 1982. Did you forget what happened right after that when the S&L and oil busts occurred?

you even admit that we have a more stable economy now. You want to go back to '82, but not '84? Talk about wanting to have your cake and eat it too.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:40 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,281 posts, read 8,089,918 times
Reputation: 8919
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Way to cherry pick 1982. Did you forget what happened right after that when the S&L and oil busts occurred?

you even admit that we have a more stable economy now. You want to go back to '82, but not '84? Talk about wanting to have your cake and eat it too.
I think that is the theme of everyone complaining here. Some people just can't accept the change no matter how good it is.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:40 PM
 
5,430 posts, read 2,827,948 times
Reputation: 10176
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
Back in 1982. Denver had per-capita income 117% of the national average.
In 2001, it was 119% of the national average
In 2014, it was 113% of the national average.

Denver was much better before in my personal opinion and it has actually has lost ground since when it was a cowtown.

It is more economically stable in the past but per-capita income was actually higher in many of those cowtown years then today.

Denver used to be a very, very affordable city with a very, very low barrier of entry to a middle-class life.

Denver now is a very, very expensive city that caters to the elite. It does not offer oppurtunity for working and middle-class masses.

People were renting apartments in Capitol Hill for less then 200/mo in the 90s.

I paid 435/mo in 2000 for my first apartment with all utilities included in North Capitol Hill which the realtors have rebranded Uptown.

I would gladly trade the Capitol Hill of 2000 with the friendly people, low rent, grit but still safe as opposed to 2016 Capitol Hill with land-rover driving yuppies and Marijuana vagabonds.
The economy was more susceptible to ups and downs (think oil and gas), but salaries went much further. A single person earning a middle-class income could actually buy a single-family house in a decent neighborhood back then. Rent was fairly cheap all over the metro area, and apartments plentiful.

I used to be able to walk even in the seedy areas of what is now LoDo without hassle, though common sense told me not to stick around, just pass through. Never had any problems with that, nor the skidrow winos. Panhandlers, I just said no and walked by without further ado. The drive on Sixth Avenue Freeway between the Lakewood-Golden line and Broadway only took 15 minutes at non-rush-hour times! And that was in the days of 55mph speed limits.

In the late 80s and early 90s I actually enjoyed going to Denver for a movie or a play at Jack's or a meal at Brick Oven Beanery. RIP. As the area became increasingly and intensively Californicated (for lack of a better word), I started hating going to town and avoided it. Pretty much restricted visits to Denver for Asian chow along Federal or to the flagship REI. I hated having to watch out for the retch-a-sketch messes left on LoDo sidewalks by weekend drunks.

People were definitely more laidback, in a GOOD way, not the stoner way. I think when I arrived, the economic downturn had flushed away a lot of people, and the remaining ones really dug in to make a living because they loved Colorado, not for drugs but for the natural features that make it unique.

There was a sweet stretch when the economy diversified enough to pull away from the "resource extraction" booms and busts but had not gone beserk. It is now well past that sweet spot of balance.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:45 PM
SQL SQL started this thread
 
Location: The State of Delusion - Colorado
1,337 posts, read 848,342 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyy View Post
I think that is the theme of everyone complaining here. Some people just can't accept the change no matter how good it is.
I don't really know enough about Denver's economic history to have a point of view. However, my concern is over the vagrant population and how it's impacting the rest of the city's populace. Maybe we can all get back to the original topic.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:51 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,281 posts, read 8,089,918 times
Reputation: 8919
Quote:
Originally Posted by SQL View Post
I don't really know enough about Denver's economic history to have a point of view. However, my concern is over the vagrant population and how it's impacting the rest of the city's populace. Maybe we can all get back to the original topic.
Yes, I agree.

My family and I love going to lower downtown but we steer clear of 16th street and have for many years because of the homeless people there.

They are all over now. I drive County Line on a daily basis and they now beg at the lights coming off of I25. I always wonder how they got themselves into their current situation.
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Old 06-24-2016, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,698 posts, read 2,349,321 times
Reputation: 2714
Denver in the early 80s, more grit, blue collared jobs, less yuppies and Californicated.



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