U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-24-2017, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Golden, CO
63 posts, read 41,993 times
Reputation: 37

Advertisements

Been looking for a house in the West-Denver to Golden area for several months now. I've noticed many (most?) of the homes in Wheat Ridge/Arvada/Lakewood/Edgewater can only see their neighbor or some trees.

If you bought one of those, do you regret not spending more/waiting longer to find a house with a view?

Growing up in FoCo and going to school in Boulder, almost every place I've lived in has had a mountain view. Now that I'm ready to buy a house, I know I'd miss not having the view, but it's hard to actually place a value on it.

Do you give up objective features (house size/quality, lot size, location) for the subjective (mountain view)?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-24-2017, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,224 posts, read 24,296,127 times
Reputation: 12930
Nope, I got lucky and got it all.
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 01:32 PM
 
255 posts, read 139,274 times
Reputation: 356
Maybe it's just me, but after a few years living here, the mountains just became something that were there. The "awe" over seeing them faded ever so slightly each year. I still see them pretty much every day that I leave my house, so it's not as if I'm missing out on them. I don't think I'd pay a steep premium just to get a glimpse of them each day from my living room. Some of the better views can actually be had in the less expensive areas of town, believe it or not, mostly due to the fact that those areas sit higher up than Denver.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,518 posts, read 10,179,145 times
Reputation: 9739
Honestly the best views of the higher peaks of the Front Range come from the eastern side of the metro area. Up the road from my house I can see Pikes, the whole Evans massif, the James Peak group, the Indian Peaks, Meeker and Longs.

All the view without all the price. Sure, it takes me 15-20 minutes longer to get to the mountains than someone in Highlands Ranch, but that's a negligible amount of time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 02:30 PM
 
255 posts, read 139,274 times
Reputation: 356
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Honestly the best views of the higher peaks of the Front Range come from the eastern side of the metro area. Up the road from my house I can see Pikes, the whole Evans massif, the James Peak group, the Indian Peaks, Meeker and Longs.

All the view without all the price. Sure, it takes me 15-20 minutes longer to get to the mountains than someone in Highlands Ranch, but that's a negligible amount of time.
Illiff and Parker has some of the best views I've seen in the metro. Especially when we eat at Sam's No. 3 on the patio.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Evergreen, Colorado
650 posts, read 563,263 times
Reputation: 999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot5 View Post
Been looking for a house in the West-Denver to Golden area for several months now. I've noticed many (most?) of the homes in Wheat Ridge/Arvada/Lakewood/Edgewater can only see their neighbor or some trees.

If you bought one of those, do you regret not spending more/waiting longer to find a house with a view?

Growing up in FoCo and going to school in Boulder, almost every place I've lived in has had a mountain view. Now that I'm ready to buy a house, I know I'd miss not having the view, but it's hard to actually place a value on it.

Do you give up objective features (house size/quality, lot size, location) for the subjective (mountain view)?
A mountain view has always been important to us. We had lakefront when we lived in FLA., and once you get used to an open view, it's hard to go back. I refuse to live where my back yard simply stares at my neighbor, who's staring back at me. lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 03:40 PM
 
1,787 posts, read 1,122,908 times
Reputation: 1110
The last 2 cities I've lived in had mountain views so I actually prefer it over concrete skyscrapers. That said, Denver really needs to expand it's skyline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,898 posts, read 6,484,940 times
Reputation: 7347
For me not a big deal. I can see the mountains out of my second floor bedroom in the winter, but come spring the trees block my view, which prefer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Golden, CO
63 posts, read 41,993 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Honestly the best views of the higher peaks of the Front Range come from the eastern side of the metro area. Up the road from my house I can see Pikes, the whole Evans massif, the James Peak group, the Indian Peaks, Meeker and Longs.

All the view without all the price. Sure, it takes me 15-20 minutes longer to get to the mountains than someone in Highlands Ranch, but that's a negligible amount of time.
Personally, I would sacrifice the mt views for a *better location in that case.

*better is subjective but I have a strong negative connotation with the Eastern side of the metro. Though, aside from my job being in Golden I don't have a concrete reason to not live in Aurora. It's not like I go hiking/skiing every single day so an extra 15 min isn't the end of the world. It's difficult to verbalize but I associate that area with higher crime, and I guess it just feels like an undesirable location (i.e. CowTown, Kansas).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2017, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Castle Rock, Co
1,614 posts, read 2,664,564 times
Reputation: 959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good Red Road View Post
A mountain view has always been important to us. We had lakefront when we lived in FLA., and once you get used to an open view, it's hard to go back. I refuse to live where my back yard simply stares at my neighbor, who's staring back at me. lol
I COMPLETELY relate to this. We bought a house that overlooked hundreds of acres of fields and we were able to watch sunsets over the fields from the back yard. Now, we back up to a neighbor but luckily we are all on 1/3+ acre lots so they are not very close but I plan to not have any neighbors behind me when I move out there!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top