U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 03-13-2008, 12:24 AM
 
4 posts, read 12,792 times
Reputation: 11
Default Gaining Residency

I'm looking to gain residency of Colorado after one year of living there. I will be living in Colorado most likely the rest of my life. Was wondering if there is anyway you can gain Colorado residency as a student after one year but with financial support from your parents? All of the sites I'm reading say you have to be emancipated from your parents, anyone know of a way around this?

Thanks to all who replied to my previous post as well!!
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2008, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,462 posts, read 14,036,886 times
Reputation: 4425
Check out this page (http://www.mscd.edu/enroll/registrar/services/tuitionClassification.htm - broken link). You either need to become an emancipated minor, get married, or enter the military. I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings here, but you can pretty much forget it; for all practical intents and purposes, getting in-state tuition in a different state when you're under 23 years old (which is what the state considers to be a minor for tuition purposes) is all but impossible. Realistically, you'll either have to shell out the cash for out-of-state tuition, get as many scholarships as you can, or attend a college in your home state and move out to Colorado after you graduate (the prudent option).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 07:26 AM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,141 posts, read 58,270,444 times
Reputation: 19697
There is not any way around these requirements that I know of. What I do know is that Colorado can be very picky about reasons to disqualify people. For example: one has met all the requirements except licensing their car, etc.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
10,839 posts, read 12,193,151 times
Reputation: 6816
When I first started college in California, I was agle to get in state tuition because just prior to college, I was in the military. More than a year before I got out of the military, I changed my home of record and started paying state taxes to California, used a friend's address to get a driver's license in CA and even drove my car out and registered it there - even though I was stationed in Texas. But other than that, I don't know how you'd do it. I payed my own way through college, so the parent thing wasn't an issue. I don't think you can do it if your parents support you.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 08:15 AM
aeh
 
318 posts, read 1,085,795 times
Reputation: 134
Ah, the age old question...I know tons of people that have tried to get around the rules in Texas and the states have just gotten too wise to this.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Denver
46 posts, read 132,743 times
Reputation: 23
I belive what I did was, get a letter from your landlord/whom ever you live with stating the time fram you lived here. Get Colorado drivers license/ID. Register as a voter. Register your car in Colorado. I did all that and became a resident and got in-state tution
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 08:19 PM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,141 posts, read 58,270,444 times
Reputation: 19697
There is a form you have to fill out. It asks for, among other things, dates of continuous presence in CO, dates of your parents' continous presence if under age 23 (I think, something like that), years you/your parents filled out CO income tax, where your car is regisitered, what the licenes plate # is, etc, etc. It is not easy. This form needs to be filled out for community colleges, CU, etc.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Chesterfield, MO
386 posts, read 1,096,540 times
Reputation: 176
Get a job in Colorado, get a license, register to vote, and file taxes here and then you'll be be golden. Colorado's residency requirements are very tough.

The key is that you get a job and file taxes here--that demonstrates financial independence despite the fact that your parents can claim you on their taxes.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 09:05 PM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,141 posts, read 58,270,444 times
Reputation: 19697
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCoDude View Post
Get a job in Colorado, get a license, register to vote, and file taxes here and then you'll be be golden. Colorado's residency requirements are very tough.

The key is that you get a job and file taxes here--that demonstrates financial independence despite the fact that your parents can claim you on their taxes.
No, it does not demonstrate financial independence. If you are claimed as a dependent on your parents' taxes, it means they provided more than 50% of your support. It has nothing to do with where you paid taxes. If you go to college out of state and work in that state, you will pay income tax there. Example: my 20 yr old went to college in Indiana and was a reisident assistant in her dorm. She has to file an Indiana income tax return. She sure as h*** wasn't self supporting from that job, which is why we can claim her as our dependent. Registering to vote means nothing. College students can register in their college town. Many college towns encourage this, such as Northfield, MN where my other daughter went to college. They had a polling place at the Union.

PS: My daughter was considered a Colorado resident when she applied to transfer to CU, despite working in Indiana and making a tiny bit of money.

Last edited by Katiana; 03-13-2008 at 09:10 PM.. Reason: addition
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,462 posts, read 14,036,886 times
Reputation: 4425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No, it does not demonstrate financial independence. If you are claimed as a dependent on your parents' taxes, it means they provided more than 50% of your support. It has nothing to do with where you paid taxes. If you go to college out of state and work in that state, you will pay income tax there. Example: my 20 yr old went to college in Indiana and was a reisident assistant in her dorm. She has to file an Indiana income tax return. She sure as h*** wasn't self supporting from that job, which is why we can claim her as our dependent. Registering to vote means nothing. College students can register in their college town. Many college towns encourage this, such as Northfield, MN where my other daughter went to college. They had a polling place at the Union.
What Katiana is saying is absolutely correct. I have lived in Arizona for 4 years, having rented an apartment here year round for the last two years, and I have even worked several part time jobs here. Yet at ASU I am still classified as an out of state student (irrelevant though, since I'm on a scholarship ), and when I applied to CU Denver I was classified as a Colorado in-state resident. Why? Because I'm still one year under that 23-year old cutoff, and I'm still tax dependent and financially indepedent on my parents, who are Colorado residents. Soon I'll be going to USC, a private school which doesn't have in-state or out-of-state tuition-- everybody pays sky high prices! I know several people here (from New Mexico, incidentally) who have tried for four years, unsucessfully, to get Arizona in-state tuition. They have AZ drivers licenses, car registration, file their own taxes, the whole shebang, and AZ STILL won't give them in-state tuition, since they are under 23 years old. Ironically, because of what this one guy did, thinking he was smart, he lost his New Mexico in-state tuition-- now he can't get in-state tuition anywhere!
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Denver

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top