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Old 04-12-2018, 03:00 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,166 posts, read 8,262,890 times
Reputation: 7063

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Looks like somebody wants to try and save the Old Girl.

https://www.thedenverchannel.com/new...he-denver-post
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Old 04-12-2018, 03:48 PM
 
1,786 posts, read 1,116,957 times
Reputation: 1110
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
NPR reporting from a Culver City, not CPR. Regardless, CPR is solid. Itís just not exciting.
No - Culver City is a neighborhood in Los Angeles, and West Coast HQ for NPR. CPR is broadcasted somewhere in Colorado, but daily programming is streamed live from Culver City on the CPR station. Same with DC.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
20,739 posts, read 11,501,424 times
Reputation: 31283
Quote:
The Denver Post has been tough on Mayor Michael Hancock. The paper's editorial staff said he's guilty of an "incredible breach of public trust" after he admitted to sending lewd text messages to a female police detective assigned to protect him.

But now Hancock is arguing the Denver Post must be saved.

He is decrying years of job cuts that have forced The Post to scale back news coverage. He's asking: "What can we do, as a government, to save The Denver Post
Denver's mayor sticks up for local paper: 'It's important for democracy'

I'm not sure what the answer is in terms of what government intervention would be appropriate but still good to keep the conversation going at least.
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Old 04-25-2018, 06:59 AM
 
201 posts, read 459,953 times
Reputation: 165
I subscribed to the Denver Post when I first moved here 12 years ago, but quickly dropped it when I saw that it was mostly ads. I got my local news from CPR (invaluable) and the little local papers. But I'm now tempted to re-subscribe to the Denver Post, if only to make the point that its "death" will be a loss to those who want a lot of voices on issues. --It was devastating to me when Clear Channel bought up all the local AM channels and put conservative (and sports) voices exclusively there. We didn't have many progressive local voices (Dr. Daddy-o was one I miss), but even the national syndicated ones (Thom Hartman, Colmes (RIP), and especially Norman Goldman, disappeared. Yes, I could stream those - I don't, though. --I love that I sometimes hate and sometimes love the DP's opinions and coverage. Good for folks like Hancock and even the odious Caldera, for standing up for the DP.
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Old 04-25-2018, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,804 posts, read 102,087,947 times
Reputation: 32917
Quote:
Originally Posted by nele View Post
I subscribed to the Denver Post when I first moved here 12 years ago, but quickly dropped it when I saw that it was mostly ads. I got my local news from CPR (invaluable) and the little local papers. But I'm now tempted to re-subscribe to the Denver Post, if only to make the point that its "death" will be a loss to those who want a lot of voices on issues. --It was devastating to me when Clear Channel bought up all the local AM channels and put conservative (and sports) voices exclusively there. We didn't have many progressive local voices (Dr. Daddy-o was one I miss), but even the national syndicated ones (Thom Hartman, Colmes (RIP), and especially Norman Goldman, disappeared. Yes, I could stream those - I don't, though. --I love that I sometimes hate and sometimes love the DP's opinions and coverage. Good for folks like Hancock and even the odious Caldera, for standing up for the DP.
I agree CPR is invaluable if you mean "not valuable". I remember back in 2002, I think it was, when CO was being consumed by wildfires, and they weren't even covering them, for example. KUNC has the best statehouse reporter in the state in Bente Berkeland, IMO.

Here in Boulder County, we get the Boulder Daily Camera for our local daily (owned by the same company), and the Sunday DP though it doesn't have much in it. DH likes the crossword puzzle; I like the Books section.
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Old 04-25-2018, 03:04 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,219 posts, read 7,993,375 times
Reputation: 8870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I agree CPR is invaluable if you mean "not valuable". I remember back in 2002, I think it was, when CO was being consumed by wildfires, and they weren't even covering them, for example. KUNC has the best statehouse reporter in the state in Bente Berkeland, IMO.

Here in Boulder County, we get the Boulder Daily Camera for our local daily (owned by the same company), and the Sunday DP though it doesn't have much in it. DH likes the crossword puzzle; I like the Books section.
I think CPR is great. I can't comment on their lack of coverage for the 2002 Hayman fire but other than that I find them to be fair and balanced.
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Old 04-25-2018, 04:09 PM
 
415 posts, read 434,370 times
Reputation: 337
Bang bang the witch is dead, well almost.
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Old 04-26-2018, 05:28 AM
 
2,071 posts, read 1,799,244 times
Reputation: 1945
Boulder's Daily Camera is owned by Alden Global also, and yesterday they terminated the editor. The ownership blocked the editor from printing a critical editorial, and he eventually posted it on the internet. That is what most likely caused his termination.
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Old 05-15-2018, 01:36 PM
 
2,243 posts, read 926,250 times
Reputation: 3677
Default This Is How a Newspaper Dies - A Short Insight into the Denver Post's Demise

A very interesting article from Politico that delves into the imminent demise of the Denver Post, and newspapers like it.

From the article:

Quote:
Smith may be a rapacious fellow, but his primary crime is recognizing that print is approaching its expiration date and is acting on the fact that more value can be extracted by sucking the marrow than by investing more deeply or selling.

Allow yourself to sympathize with Smith for a moment. He’s deeply invested in a stagnant industry whose primary audience is approaching its own expiration date. Think of the Denver Post and most other newspapers as your grandfather who is on dialysis, has a pacemaker and totes an oxygen tank behind him. He looks alive, but he’s overdue. Your grandfather is a pretty good stand-in for the average newspaper subscriber, too. Habituated to his morning newspaper, he’ll resist cancelling his subscription no matter how raggedy the paper gets or how high the owners jack up the price. (Alden is among the most aggressive in boosting subscription prices, Doctor tells the Daily Beast.)

The business-school label for tactics like Alden’s, in which you get fewer customers to pay more for less, as Philip Meyer wrote in his book The Vanishing Newspaper, is “harvesting market position.” By raising prices and lowering quality, a stagnant business can rely on its most loyal customers to continue to buy the product, allowing it to squeeze and squeeze and squeeze its customers as they croak. This slow liquidation of an asset’s value, destroying even its reputation in the process, kills the product. Wherever newspapers can be found reducing page size, cutting news pages, narrowing coverage area, reducing staff, shrinking circulation area, postponing the purchase of new equipment and raising subscription prices, they are harvesting market position. Faced with two business options, earn small sums from his newspapers over an indeterminate time or cash in big all at once, perhaps hastening the end, Smith has chosen the latter.
I thought the points in bold were particularly insightful as to what the end goal is with the newspaper, and perhaps the industry as a whole.

SOURCE: https://www.politico.com/magazine/st...ndustry-218360

Last edited by Left-handed; 05-15-2018 at 01:55 PM..
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Old 05-15-2018, 01:57 PM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,754,895 times
Reputation: 22726
I have said this before about The Denver Post, and I will repeat it here: we will not really understand what we've lost with the demise of the paper until it's gone. I am a subscriber, and I will hang on until the bitter end.
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