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Old 06-08-2018, 11:57 AM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,279 posts, read 8,084,120 times
Reputation: 8917

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK123 View Post
Assessed value dropped 7.3K from 2017 to 2018. Total tax mill levy dropped from 111.679 to 108.0798 (jeffco).
I envy you. It is a bittersweet thing because of the value dropping based on their assessment but I would take the lower taxes any day especially if it is my forever home.
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Old 06-08-2018, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,567 posts, read 1,828,681 times
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,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyy View Post
Isn't $540K in the OC quite reasonable by their standards? I know the home I grew up in San Diego is worth around $600K and but it has turned into a dumpy neighborhood that has no pride of ownership. It wouldn't be on my short places to live if I moved back.
Touche, Timmyy. It's been years since I did RE shopping in OC or SD County. You're probably right that $540 won't buy that much anymore. But if commuting isn't part of your daily routine, SW Riverside County would be a good option.
It continues to boom (Temecula, Murrieta are nice towns--not as exp. as SD County or OC.) I almost bought there once. Lovely climate, good views of the snow capped mountains.) Lots and lots of stucco sided subdivision homes as far as the eye can see. So if you hate that look, it won't work.

Last edited by DougStark; 06-08-2018 at 04:51 PM.. Reason: Punctuation
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Old 06-08-2018, 04:55 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,279 posts, read 8,084,120 times
Reputation: 8917
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
,
Touche, Timmyy. It's been years since I did RE shopping in OC or SD County. You're probably right that $540 won't buy that much anymore. But if commuting isn't part of your daily routine, SW Riverside County would be a good option.
It continues to boom (Temecula, Murrieta are nice towns--not as exp. as SD County or OC.) I almost bought there once. Lovely climate, good views of the snow capped mountains.) Lots and lots of stucco sided subdivision homes as far as the eye can see. So if you hate that look, it won't work.
I have quite a few friends that now live in Temecula which is affordable and not a bad place to live. Some of those friends commute into San Diego for work which I find insane. That is a hell of a commute.
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Old 06-08-2018, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,567 posts, read 1,828,681 times
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Yeah, that commute from Temecula into SD County goes through mountainous terrain--the hills are planted with avocado groves, assuming the ranchers can make the water costs work on paper. Plus, I think there's a ICE or INS checkpoint on the fwy, which slows things down ��
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Old 06-08-2018, 05:49 PM
 
20,900 posts, read 39,168,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmyy View Post
I have quite a few friends that now live in Temecula which is affordable and not a bad place to live. Some of those friends commute into San Diego for work which I find insane. That is a hell of a commute.
Areas around Temecula are actually affordable, like Murietta and Menifee, especially in those areas that do not have to pay the Mello Roos taxes to pay for local improvements in some disctricts.

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Old 06-09-2018, 12:13 AM
 
144 posts, read 110,136 times
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I hear you on that median price of home in Denver. Just saying Denver has gotten so popular and housing has gone up so much more than other Midwest cities. It's not just Denver either. I don't know if this is the reason, but it seems that with the ability to telecommute and take your high paying job with you, places with access to mountains that have decent city amenities have appreciated more than other places. It's a simple fact of market supply and demand. And lots of people from higher cost areas have a lot of equity in their homes, so don't balk at Denver prices.

My husband retired this year. I'll probably be working for the next eight years or so, and although I really do like going into the office, I could telecommute. We had lived in Denver back in the mid to late 80s in one of the older cute neighborhoods, Washington Park, and absolutely loved it back then. We especially love the lovely summers in Denver that aren't overly humid and the many days of sunshine. Access to Rocky Mountain National Park, just two hours away is wonderful too. And although we don't ski any more we skied back then.

Anyway long story short I love our current home and neighborhood, but thought about maybe moving back to Denver for the nicer summer climate/access to mountains and a similarly sized metro area to what we have right now (means lots of public amenities, great theatre, zoo, etc.). Three years ago (summer 2015) before visiting Rocky Mountain Park we explored what the real estate market was in those lovely older close in neighborhoods in Denver. OMG -- Our $350,000 house is paid off, but to find something similar to that in one of those lovely older city neighborhoods, It looked like I would have had to bring another $250,000 or more to the table. We weren't willing to compromise on housing and that extra cost wasn't worth it to us. We also and that makes it harder were looking for move in ready. Now those neighborhoods are priced even higher.

The one area we could afford and get move in ready housing we liked without even bringing extra money to the table were more remote areas like Evergreen (beautiful and nice housing). In the end though we decided these places were too remote for us (we like being close to city amenities). These were really nice places, though, if something more rural / small city would work for you with not too bad access to Denver as long as you are not commuting in, but coming in for fun things at non rush hour times.

The next year (2016), two years ago before staying for a week in Keystone, we explored the suburb areas. They were still expensive compared to where we currently live but considerably more affordable than the charming older neighborhoods. It's just our preference and what we like, but we just didn't like the sameness of things, the lack of trees. Things in the price range we were looking were pretty darn cookie cutter. And of course, there aren't going to be as many trees in Denver, given the climate. The older areas, though, do have quite a few trees. It wasn't a -- oh let's move here moment. It was more a "boy I never realized how good I have it where I live now and greater appreciation for what I already have" moment.

Places like Bozeman, MT have really seen housing go up too. And although still way more affordable than Denver the housing markets in Boise and Colorado Springs are appreciating really quickly right now. I'm guessing telecommuters looking for areas with access to mountains and city amenities are discovering these too and that that is counting for some of the appreciation.

I'm still a little envious of all of you who live in those neat older areas in Denver. Denver for us, though, was too big a stretch financially for what we like in housing and neighborhood when we looked, and it's off our list now for a potential place to move to.

(It is true taxes are considerably lower in Denver for the same value of house were we live. But taxes are actually similar for a similar house/neighborhood we thought -- our taxes for a $350,000 house in a charming older neighborhood are about the same as Washington Park taxes for a $600,000 house). And now the Wash Park houses are even more expensive than that. I am talking 2015 prices.
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Old 06-09-2018, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,941 posts, read 6,550,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Did you say "everyone" no, but you said it, and trying to weasel out of it by parsing each word just makes you look bad.
Yep. He should just own it.
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Old 06-09-2018, 08:19 AM
 
2,038 posts, read 1,946,438 times
Reputation: 3449
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
You got that right. I lived for a time in Ashtabula Ohio, a rotting carcass of a rust belt city on the shores of lake erie, about halfway between Cleveland and Erie Pa.

I owned a $68,000 house and my property taxes were over $3000 a year. I don't even pay a third of that now on a $200,000 house in Colorado Springs.
The property tax in Colorado Springs is less than 0.5%? Is that true for all of CO?
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Old 06-09-2018, 08:34 AM
 
2,038 posts, read 1,946,438 times
Reputation: 3449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Areas around Temecula are actually affordable, like Murietta and Menifee, especially in those areas that do not have to pay the Mello Roos taxes to pay for local improvements in some disctricts.

Here's a current example.
I've always wondered where people living in the Temecula area go to work. It seems to be a bedroom community far away from employment centers.
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Old 06-09-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,941 posts, read 6,550,788 times
Reputation: 7426
Quote:
Originally Posted by fumbling View Post
The property tax in Colorado Springs is less than 0.5%? Is that true for all of CO?
Denver is 0.56%. El Paso County where Colorado Springs is located is 0.524%. Statewide I think we average around 0.6%
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