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Old 09-30-2018, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,064 posts, read 11,690,153 times
Reputation: 31985

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Quote:
Originally Posted by High Altitude View Post
Come on now.

Companies lay people off and send them home that day all the time.

Not really any different.

This is the problem with employers.

They do all the things they don't want employees doing to them, but it is perfectly OK for the employer to do it.
I don't disagree that some employers do fire people and walk them out, and that sometimes, they won't allow someone to work out their notice.

But I personally would not burn my bridges and have never left a position without giving notice, and usually, it's been longer than 2 weeks, allowing for additional time to wrap things up, write up transfer memos on my work, etc. Especially within a professional community, you never know when someone at a job you left could end up being the decision maker on a future job you want.
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Old 09-30-2018, 06:03 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,268 posts, read 8,057,703 times
Reputation: 8911
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Altitude View Post
Come on now.

Companies lay people off and send them home that day all the time.

Not really any different.

This is the problem with employers.

They do all the things they don't want employees doing to them, but it is perfectly OK for the employer to do it.
If I was to get laid off right now from my company I would get a nice package. If I was to quit I would put in at least a week's notice. The majority of people I work with and that I know that work in the same field would do the same thing. This guy that left definitely burnt some bridges and not just in my company. I think it is in the best interest of both the employer and employee if a notice is given. It isn't like this guy was delivering pizzas and just decided to stop coming in.
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Old 09-30-2018, 11:56 PM
 
82 posts, read 59,126 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by COJeff View Post
Yet you will lay a person off with out a two week notice. How is that not any bit different than your gripe?
I'm a hospitality manager, so some of the processes I follow may be different than other fields since I'm unsure how others operate. I need to follow a pretty rigid documentation process if I let someone go or reduce their hours to a certain point. Yeah, we're an at will employer and both sides can cut the cord at anytime, but my employees would get "notice". If someone is getting let go, they're going to see it coming since they've already signed a few documents ending in "up to and including termination".

I don't have employees approach me with "write ups" 3 or 4 times throughout their tenure and say "Hey, you're not living up to what I was expecting and if things don't change I'll have to be leaving soon". Of course people will check in and let me know if there's an issue, but there's no formal process that they have to follow as the employer does.

If someone comes in drunk and starts pissing on a wall, yeah they might not get any notice and HR won't have a problem with it.

My company is based out of CA, so some of their state specific labor laws which are pretty particular spill into CO so company policies within HR stay consistent.

Now that I think about it, I've probably only let a handful of people go in my 8 years of management. I try and be pretty understanding when it comes to individual situations.

I guess if I was a cut throat business buff who only cared about bottom dollar and had no sympathy for humanity, and we're simply discussing who caused the exit and how it's played out, and I didn't have an HR process to follow, I'd say it would be justified because of the wellness of other employees.

If someone is getting let go, I'll at least have a plan to cover their absence and not have a scheduling gap. When someone abandons a job unexpectedly, other employees usual have to pick up the shifts/slack/pieces and these people get left hanging. The latter causing employees to get pissed which is no good for mr. cut throat business dude. Hah, I guess he does care about others to a point.

I think my "gripe" would be that I myself, company aside, have only let 1 person go on the same day as it was justified (stealing from others). But unfortunately in my field where the tipping weight isn't in my favor, it's happened to me plenty and it affects everyone around me. It's pretty cool letting someone know they can use me as a reference down the road if they exit the right way. I also like to do exit interviews so see what the root cause was for someone leaving.

I've also been in the OPs shoes and it's not a cool thing. Whether we're talking accepting a job or rejecting one from either point of view, or not even hearing about it in the first place, communication is important. I stay on top of it pretty well, it'd be cool to see that be reciprocated.

Last edited by LostSailor4326; 10-01-2018 at 12:16 AM..
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Old 10-06-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Chicago
98 posts, read 184,766 times
Reputation: 70
Just had a two day management meeting with HR of the Fortune 500 company that I work for. 3-5 years at a job is average for millennials, and two week notice is only a courtesy, not a requirement.
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Old 10-06-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,268 posts, read 8,057,703 times
Reputation: 8911
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacubz View Post
Just had a two day management meeting with HR of the Fortune 500 company that I work for. 3-5 years at a job is average for millennials, and two week notice is only a courtesy, not a requirement.
It is a courtesy that will benefit the employee long term. Just walking out on a job with little to no notice could damage future relationships and an applicant's reputation.
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
801 posts, read 252,551 times
Reputation: 1891
Now I'm becoming more convinced it is a Colorado or Denver thing. She has applied with some national companies and they have been very responsive and maintained open lines of communication. It's the local companies that have shown a disregard for common professional courtesy.
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Old 10-12-2018, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,245 posts, read 2,893,646 times
Reputation: 12328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey2k View Post
Now I'm becoming more convinced it is a Colorado or Denver thing. She has applied with some national companies and they have been very responsive and maintained open lines of communication. It's the local companies that have shown a disregard for common professional courtesy.
To be fair, national companies tend to have large, dedicated HR staffing and well-developed policies. Companies up to 100 employees or so tend to have an HR person who is more concerned with payroll and health coverage than new-hire issues. Which doesn't disprove your contention, but it may be a kind of apples to oranges comparison.

Me? Two more solicited, well-matched, targeted applications with a detailed cover letter that disappeared into the the void. Local companies. Sigh.
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Old 10-14-2018, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
3,768 posts, read 4,627,028 times
Reputation: 4894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey2k View Post
Now I'm becoming more convinced it is a Colorado or Denver thing. She has applied with some national companies and they have been very responsive and maintained open lines of communication. It's the local companies that have shown a disregard for common professional courtesy.

I know that with many companies getting huge responses to job openings over the years that many have gotten lazy with even the basic courtesy stuff. I have had more than 1 hiring manager that I knew personally tell me that basically they don't have to do any of it because they know that hundreds of people will continue to apply for every position they try to hire for. We will see if they can continue to treat people that way with the rising cost of living and lower quality of life but for now they know they are in the drivers seat and can get away with it.
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Old 10-18-2018, 01:12 PM
 
7,336 posts, read 16,609,302 times
Reputation: 4567
I'm retired now, but will ring in here anyway. During part of my working career years, I learned about Purchasing. One thing that was drilled into my mind, and a whole lot by my last Supervisor/Director (CPM: Certified Purchasing Manager) was "follow up" on items we ordered, but not yet received. That "follow up" meaning phone calls about why things ordered hadn't come in yet. Well, putting "follow up" to use, when looking for a job, I would call an employer that I had an interview with to find out any decision on the job applied for. Of course, I may be told, "We haven't made a decision yet. Will call you if we want you." Back in the 80's, that statement "will call you if we want you" was ok with me. But, the years following, not nearly so much. Call me impatient or not trusting, but I didn't believe the "will call" thing. I'd wait a week or so and call back.

See, doing a follow-up call, or calls, does show the company you are REALLY, REALLY interested in them. You are a "go getter" and many companies like that kind of personality. Now, a person may not get that job, but at least your not sitting around wondering and moaning about not getting a call.


SO....…….make the call, and if nothing happens, in a week or so, make another call.
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Old 10-18-2018, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Denver via Austin
3,108 posts, read 6,482,894 times
Reputation: 3511
In my experience, it’s somewhat standard to not hear back at all even when you’ve gone through multiple interviews and even when you send follow up emails and calls (which inevitably will go to voicemail that is inevitably ignored). This goes for my technical field in both Denver and Austin at least. It really peeves me, so I’ve had recruiters for some of the same companies call me, I’ve told them exactly why I have no interest. I got a company blacklisted from my university after they wasted hours of mine and several of my classmates’ time (in addition to the interviewer making snide remarks about how we compared to his alma mater). HR is a total joke oftentimes and completely divorced from reality. I’m just focusing on building up hard, niche skills because employers can’t jerk you around as easily.
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