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Old 01-05-2007, 11:22 AM
 
16 posts, read 113,785 times
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Hi,

We moved to Denver in Oct & are currently renting in SE Denver. I would love some real peoples opinions on where to buy a house. My husband works in downtown Denver (wants no more than a 30 minute commute or so), we have a small child (school districts are important..so far I like Jefferson, Cherry Creek & Douglas County districts), and we would like to stay under $325K. I loved Parker, but thought that the commute would stink, Highland Ranch seems okay (I heard the land shifts a lot), so now I am thinking Littleton. Any opinions on going further North? I do NOT want a brand new house. I would prefer something in a nice neighborhood, where I can put a little sweat equity into. Thanks in advance for your opinions!
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Old 01-05-2007, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
210 posts, read 1,024,899 times
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When you say north, are you referring to Westminster/Thornton/Northglenn area? There certainly are nice areas in that part of town, although the schools would likely be Adams County, which has more of a hit-and-miss reputation for good schools than Cherry Creek or Douglas County. If you want to move that direction, I would suggest looking into the area schools first, to make sure you can find one that you like nearby. If you want to stay in school districts that have good reputations systemwide, I'd consider Littleton, which has its own school district, or Highlands Ranch. Most of Highlands Ranch is newer development (built in the last 10-15 years) so if you're wanting an older house that may not be the best place to look. There are many great neighborhoods in the Littleton area that are older homes, but that are still well-kept and safe.
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Old 01-05-2007, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Highlands Ranch, CO
615 posts, read 2,168,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamellan View Post
Highland Ranch seems okay (I heard the land shifts a lot), so now I am thinking Littleton.
Expansive soils are a problem all throughout the Denver Metro Area, not just HR, since there is a lot of Bentonite clay in the soil.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamellan View Post
Any opinions on going further North?
Personally, I would stay south. There are some nice areas north of Denver, but I think there are many areas south that are nicer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamellan View Post
I do NOT want a brand new house. I would prefer something in a nice neighborhood, where I can put a little sweat equity into.
Besides Littleton, there is the city of Centennial and the Acres Green area that have older homes.
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Old 01-06-2007, 02:04 AM
 
Location: On our boat!
5,684 posts, read 10,543,804 times
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We bought a very nice 2-story house in central Parker in April of 2004. It cost $262 and the development was built in 2000. I have been commuting to my job, which is about 2 miles north of downtown Denver. It takes me, on the average, about 30 minutes to get there in the AM, however I do start work at 7AM. The only time the commute can be long is in the winter in bad weather. Even though Parker has been growing like a weed, it is still a very "desirable" area to live in.
By the way, there are a lot of people that live in Parker and make the commute to downtown Denver.
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Old 01-06-2007, 09:58 AM
Status: "2B the trusted driving force in local real estate." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: South Metro Denver for 25 years
8,693 posts, read 19,386,658 times
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CCSD actually incorporates the SE part of Denver, so maybe you could move nearby and get the better school district. You'd also be closer to 9 mile light rail & maybe hubby could take light rail & spend less time in traffic.
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Old 01-06-2009, 10:15 AM
 
Location: chicago
39 posts, read 180,209 times
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So whats the prime locations you would suggest if you wanted to work in DENVER and live in a surrounding suburb?
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Old 01-06-2009, 02:40 PM
 
4,931 posts, read 8,843,469 times
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Any suburbs of Denver has areas that can satisfy your needs, if you work in Denver.
If you work in the DTC, then it makes sense to live in southern suburbs such as Aurora, Centennial, Littleton, Englewood, Lonetree.

If you work downtown, you can live in the south but some of the north, northwest and western suburbs are closer, such as Westminster, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Broomfield.

If you work in the north near the Airport then Northglenn, Thornton, Commerce City, Aurora and Brighton may be better.

If you are looking for established older suburbs, there are many parts in all suburbs that can meet your needs.

However, if you are working in Denver then consider living in Denver. There are many fine established neighborhoods and some look like a suburban environment. Many people who come here from other cities, especially eastern cities, believe that the suburbs are the best and prime areas to live because of their experience with other metro areas. That is not true in Denver. Denver is very expansive, with much open space and parks, and has all types of neighborhoods that can meet your needs. In addition, you will find Denver much safer and cleaner than many of the other cities in your experiences.

Keep in mind that Denver is growing and many people are moving into the city not fleeing decay as you see in many cities. These people are natives and long term residents who do know what the city has to offer. In addition, we are seeing new arrivals, from many economic classes, going into our city because they have heard how great things about living in Denver. So if you are looking for an older established neighborhood with good characteristics, then I would suggest looking at Denver. Search this website and read about the neighborhoods mentioned and to give you a guide, here is a map of the Denver neighborhoods:

http://www.denvergov.org/denvermaps/downloads/maps/citywide/Neighborhoods.pdf (broken link)


Livecontent
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Old 01-06-2009, 03:25 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 3,102,158 times
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I'd check out Wheat Ridge and Arvada.
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Old 01-06-2009, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Denver
90 posts, read 255,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
Any suburbs of Denver has areas that can satisfy your needs, if you work in Denver.
If you work in the DTC, then it makes sense to live in southern suburbs such as Aurora, Centennial, Littleton, Englewood, Lonetree.

If you work downtown, you can live in the south but some of the north, northwest and western suburbs are closer, such as Westminster, Arvada, Wheat Ridge, Lakewood, Broomfield.

If you work in the north near the Airport then Northglenn, Thornton, Commerce City, Aurora and Brighton may be better.

If you are looking for established older suburbs, there are many parts in all suburbs that can meet your needs.

However, if you are working in Denver then consider living in Denver. There are many fine established neighborhoods and some look like a suburban environment. Many people who come here from other cities, especially eastern cities, believe that the suburbs are the best and prime areas to live because of their experience with other metro areas. That is not true in Denver. Denver is very expansive, with much open space and parks, and has all types of neighborhoods that can meet your needs. In addition, you will find Denver much safer and cleaner than many of the other cities in your experiences.

Keep in mind that Denver is growing and many people are moving into the city not fleeing decay as you see in many cities. These people are natives and long term residents who do know what the city has to offer. In addition, we are seeing new arrivals, from many economic classes, going into our city because they have heard how great things about living in Denver. So if you are looking for an older established neighborhood with good characteristics, then I would suggest looking at Denver. Search this website and read about the neighborhoods mentioned and to give you a guide, here is a map of the Denver neighborhoods:

http://www.denvergov.org/denvermaps/downloads/maps/citywide/Neighborhoods.pdf (broken link)


Livecontent
I agree. Denver is LOADED with older, suburban-feeling, tree-lined neighborhoods. In all directions too. I moved to Colorado from the east coast (Maryland/DC/Baltimore) and immediately ruled-out city living because to me, anyone with any wits stays the hell away from the city. Now, I'm reconsidering. In Denver, it's not nearly as intimidating as these east coast cities. And the urban core doesn't even feel that dense.
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:41 AM
 
Location: USA
1,582 posts, read 3,068,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cory81 View Post
Now, I'm reconsidering. In Denver, it's not nearly as intimidating as these east coast cities. And the urban core doesn't even feel that dense.

You're right. Its not like the East and you can live a more urban life in Denver if you want to and be safe.
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