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Old 01-08-2010, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
2,212 posts, read 3,167,024 times
Reputation: 2318

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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverkid View Post
Denver: Brown and ugly much of the years
Portland: Green, lush, and beautiful all year.
Totally different climates. My grandparents lived in Portland for nearly 15 years and my grandfather said he could count on one hand the number of times he had to manually water his lawn and there are many times during the summer when Portland and Seattle have tighter water restrictions than we do.

Denver: People get the impression that "brown" means "ugly" and "dead." Denver is part of the Great Plains. The Chamber of Commerce likes to put out pictures which make Denver seem like it sits in a valley between mountain ranges. People come to visit us and always comment, "I thought Denver was in the mountains." Nope.

There IS a beauty in the Great Plains. No, it's not lush in terms of green and if we actually had to conserve water and use xeriscape (which I am in total favor of), there would be even less greenery in Denver.

Appreciate where you live. After growing up in Seattle, my definition of "forest" meant thick, dark green (almost black) dense trees which is, in fact, absolutely gorgeous. That doesn't take away from the beauty of the forests that we have here in Colorado. They're just different.
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Old 01-08-2010, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
2,212 posts, read 3,167,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by log ravine View Post
thank you for your replies. I will need sit back in my chair and absorb these ideas and thoughts (particularly the hairy armpits and crotches)
Additionally, I've heard people refer to Denver as "Menver" because of the lack of women. Though I'm married myself, I've always believed that it's not the quantity, it's the quality. And you just need to find "one" (more than that and you'll need to move to Utah).

That being said, Portland may not be your cup of tea either if you're looking for hot single women...according to this article: Portland for Lesbians
"Portland is said to have one of the largest concentrations of lesbians on the West Coast".

Quality, not quantity. Unless of course, you're a lesbian...in which case Portland may be for you.
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Old 01-08-2010, 07:08 PM
 
973 posts, read 718,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post
Totally different climates. My grandparents lived in Portland for nearly 15 years and my grandfather said he could count on one hand the number of times he had to manually water his lawn and there are many times during the summer when Portland and Seattle have tighter water restrictions than we do.

Huh? Granted I only lived in Portland for 5 years, but there were never summer water restrictions nor did I hear talk about any impending water restriction or previous water restrictions - and I was there for the "drought" years (could have fooled me though) of 2001-2006. I googled it, and I can't find any information about current or past watering restrictions.

In my experience, most of the Portland just chose not to water their lawns - ever. The rain kept them green and lush from September-June, and from Jun-August they were brown and ugly.


Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post
Denver: People get the impression that "brown" means "ugly" and "dead." Denver is part of the Great Plains. The Chamber of Commerce likes to put out pictures which make Denver seem like it sits in a valley between mountain ranges. People come to visit us and always comment, "I thought Denver was in the mountains." Nope.

There IS a beauty in the Great Plains. No, it's not lush in terms of green and if we actually had to conserve water and use xeriscape (which I am in total favor of), there would be even less greenery in Denver.

In comparison, Portland is lush and green during the winter and Denver is brown (I didn't say dead). I stand by what I said. To me, Denver is ugly most of the winter (a nice blanket of snow is beautiful though). Denver is a urban/suburban built environment. Most of the greenery is non-native plant species that go dormant and brown most during the winter. I don't find that attractive - never have and never will.

But, like you said, there certainly is beauty in the Great Plains. The Pawnee National Grassland in north eastern Colorado to me is incredibly beautiful and one of my favorite parts of the state.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post
Appreciate where you live. After growing up in Seattle, my definition of "forest" meant thick, dark green (almost black) dense trees which is, in fact, absolutely gorgeous. That doesn't take away from the beauty of the forests that we have here in Colorado. They're just different.
I very much appreciate where I live. That's why I've made Denver home for 22 years (well, there was the being born here part too).
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Old 01-09-2010, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
11,288 posts, read 12,902,657 times
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Yeah, I'm not a fan of the winter brown either. I feel like someone sucked all the color out of the landscape. But the positives outweigh the negatives for me in Denver. And I planted a lot of Holly, Boxwood, and Pine bushes in my landscape for a little winter green!
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Old 01-10-2010, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
2,212 posts, read 3,167,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverkid View Post
Huh? Granted I only lived in Portland for 5 years, but there were never summer water restrictions nor did I hear talk about any impending water restriction or previous water restrictions - and I was there for the "drought" years (could have fooled me though) of 2001-2006. I googled it, and I can't find any information about current or past watering restrictions.

I very much appreciate where I live. That's why I've made Denver home for 22 years (well, there was the being born here part too).
I haven't been to Portland for years (I think the last time I was there was to see my grandparents in Lake Oswego in 2001 on the way to Seaside), but we would go and visit them every summer when I was growing up and I remember my grandpa always complaining about how everything was dying because of the watering restrictions. I don't know more than that. His gardens and lawn always looked amazing to me...but he said he hated the summer because his lawn died.

Glad to hear you like it in Denver too. It's not perfect and one person's paradise is another person's hell but I think there are a lot of people on this site who post questions like, "should I live here or here?" and really, what makes a place great isn't just what it looks like on paper...it's who you become friends with, where you find a good job and where you start to build another phase of your life in. I've known people to be miserable in Hawaii and others who wouldn't leave Rapid City for all of the money in the world. That's why I wrote "enjoy where you live."
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Old 01-11-2010, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
11,288 posts, read 12,902,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post
I haven't been to Portland for years (I think the last time I was there was to see my grandparents in Lake Oswego in 2001 on the way to Seaside), but we would go and visit them every summer when I was growing up and I remember my grandpa always complaining about how everything was dying because of the watering restrictions. I don't know more than that. His gardens and lawn always looked amazing to me...but he said he hated the summer because his lawn died.

Glad to hear you like it in Denver too. It's not perfect and one person's paradise is another person's hell but I think there are a lot of people on this site who post questions like, "should I live here or here?" and really, what makes a place great isn't just what it looks like on paper...it's who you become friends with, where you find a good job and where you start to build another phase of your life in. I've known people to be miserable in Hawaii and others who wouldn't leave Rapid City for all of the money in the world. That's why I wrote "enjoy where you live."
One nice thing I noticed about Portland is that you have a lot more options on things to grow/plant since it doesn't get below freezing much. Denver's climate creates more of a gardening challenge than I care for!
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Old 01-11-2010, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
2,212 posts, read 3,167,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
One nice thing I noticed about Portland is that you have a lot more options on things to grow/plant since it doesn't get below freezing much. Denver's climate creates more of a gardening challenge than I care for!
Sure. I grew up in Seattle with apple blossom and cherry blossom trees in our front yard, rhododendrons that looked like they were absolutely bursting with blooms and roses that quite literally climbed the fences and took over our entire backyard. In order to have those flowers, however, it rained constantly. It's a little give and take. Sure...Denver is not as green but I have never been to Portland for any length of time when it hasn't rained ansd is overcast at least once. Some people aren't bothered by that if they grow up there (I was never bothered by Seattle's weather until I moved away and then came back to visit) but for me, I'd take Denver's sunshine over the Portland weather any day. That means that it's not as green here. If that's the price we pay (and therefore have to find flowers and trees that WILL grow here) then that's okay with me. Florida is the only place I've lived where you get green and sunshine but it's unbelievably humid there...again, give and take. I have a great little garden here in Denver...tomatoes and blueberries (and I'm working on pumpkins) and great flower pots on the front porch. Next year, I'll try planting a few more veggies and see how they turn out.
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Old 01-11-2010, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
3,911 posts, read 5,332,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post

In addition, I have found that most Denverites have a very "live and let live" philosophy. This is the 8th state I've lived in and I think people are far more tolerant of their differences than anywhere else. There are idiots everywhere but I haven't seen the deep segregation and luxuries only to the rich that dominate so much of the country.
That's because the ethnic makeup of Denver is much more homogenous than other cities.
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Old 01-11-2010, 10:08 PM
mlb
 
Location: Rocky Mountains Wasatch Front
1,281 posts, read 1,087,627 times
Reputation: 1487
Just my own observations... we considered either Denver or Salt Lake - back in the late 80's. We lived in Los Angeles at the time.

Salt Lake won - because:

1. Closer proximity to the outdoors and mountains.

2. Cheaper.

3. Denver's SMOG was literally worse than Los Angeles's. We could barely breathe in the middle of summer.

As for Portland - we've never been - but we did drive through Oregon last summer. Aside from really liking Corvallis (a college town with charm)...

The unemployment rate in Oregon is/was between 15% and 19%. NOT a good omen.
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Old 01-12-2010, 02:45 PM
 
92 posts, read 243,200 times
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Don't know if it would make a difference in your decision Portland vs Denver, but if you like to get out of town from time to time, the OR coast is much cheaper than the CO mountains. I rented a house on the beach in Netarts OR for 10 days one summer for $1100. I had looked around CO resort towns and there most vacation rental homes were at least twice the price for the same season. In the end, it was cheaper to fly, rent a car, and stay on the OR coast than it was for me to stay in my own state.

While the places in CO were newer and more luxurious, I rather liked the downscale charm of the house and Tillamook county. It felt more like i was getting out into the country, and so more of a contrast to my day-to-day life.

Again, I don't know if such a thing would be a consideration for you, but I found it interesting. And i envy your luck in having the luxury of choosing between such great places. Good luck!
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