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Thread summary:

Moving to Denver metro area, seeking information on Denver sprawl problem, explosive population growth Denver metro area, urban sprawl problem

 
 
Old 06-30-2008, 09:37 PM
 
Location: cincinnati northern, ky
839 posts, read 1,997,741 times
Reputation: 157

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So I go by a pizza place a few nights a week after work and one night the guy who always waits on me notices my Colorado I-70 sticker on my rear bumper and asks me about it. He is from Durango and grew up in Pagosa Springs and went to school in Denver. I tell him i have visited Colorado three times in less than a year and its where i want to live really bad. So we get to talking and i told him i how i was planning on the Denver area. He firsts mentions the sprawl and I told him about this forum and how i have become so informed about Colorado through it. So the entire issue of sprawl has suddenly sprang to mind. How sprawled has Denver become? I think its a growing metro area but people are also moving out to right? Also why has Colorado Springs not seen the population boom Denver has? just a few questions i am getting close to headin out for good and the more i know i figure cant hurt. LOL i guess i am not the only person who likes the dry crisp air of colorado!!!
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Old 06-30-2008, 09:56 PM
 
8,177 posts, read 16,227,357 times
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Anybody who has lived in Colorado for more than 20 years (over a half-century for me) will tell you that sprawl is out of control in the Denver metro area. The amount of land lost to sprawl--particularly in the last 15 years or so, is simply staggering. Newcomers don't get it, because they didn't see what it was then compared to what it is today. As for Colorado Springs, sprawl is as big a problem there as it is in Denver--it's just that the Springs started from a much lower population base when the post-WWII sprawl phenomenon hit. If the rate of Colorado's growth trends--more correctly STUPID growth trends continue--the Front Range will be an unlivable hell-hole in another ten years or so. I don't think that will happen because the whole unsustainable mess is likely to implode on itself before then. I think we are very close to that "tipping point."
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Burque!
3,695 posts, read 6,480,859 times
Reputation: 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Anybody who has lived in Colorado for more than 20 years (over a half-century for me) will tell you that sprawl is out of control in the Denver metro area. The amount of land lost to sprawl--particularly in the last 15 years or so, is simply staggering. Newcomers don't get it, because they didn't see what it was then compared to what it is today. As for Colorado Springs, sprawl is as big a problem there as it is in Denver--it's just that the Springs started from a much lower population base when the post-WWII sprawl phenomenon hit. If the rate of Colorado's growth trends--more correctly STUPID growth trends continue--the Front Range will be an unlivable hell-hole in another ten years or so. I don't think that will happen because the whole unsustainable mess is likely to implode on itself before then. I think we are very close to that "tipping point."
Amen to that!

Man, where were you when I was defending living simply rather than living it up?!
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Carefree Arizona
127 posts, read 310,498 times
Reputation: 80
Sprawl may be a problem in Denver Metro and the front range, but be thankful that your sprawl has not altered the night time temperature like it has here in Phoenix Metropolitan. Development, specifically all the concrete that replaced the natural sonoran desert, has created an urban heat island that has raised the overall night time temperature. We have had an overnight low temperature as high as 90 degrees when the day time high has reached 110-115 degrees. It's only a matter of time before the overnight low will be 100 degrees. Even the summer thunderstorm season is not as productive in the amount of rain fall like it was 10-15 years ago.
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:25 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,058 posts, read 60,642,093 times
Reputation: 20202
I have lived in Colorado almost 30 yrs now and I do not agree with jazzlover's post. It is true that newcomers see how it is now and not how it was 50 yrs ago. None of us posting on this board know how it was 100 years ago. The point is, the only constant in life is change. I think growth has been managed fairly well. Yes, there are things that could have been done better, but the past is the past. We have an excellent transit system. The burbs have many of the amenities of the city, with shopping, rec centers, JOBS, and much more. The area is fairly compact. It depends of course, on what you are comparing Colorado to. If you are comparing it to a rust-belt city that is losing population, yes, there is a lot of new housing and it may look a bit raw. But believe me, having problems like school overcrowding is more challenging to deal with, in a good way of challenging, than having to close schools due to population loss, like in Pittsburgh.

Last edited by Katiana; 06-30-2008 at 10:55 PM.. Reason: Clarification of who I was responding to, typo
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:37 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,058 posts, read 60,642,093 times
Reputation: 20202
Quote:
Originally Posted by CareFreeAZ View Post
Even the summer thunderstorm season is not as productive in the amount of rain fall like it was 10-15 years ago.
Do you have any verification of that? I have heard about how cities, all cities, retain heat, and don't cool off at night like the (gasp!) burbs and rural areas, but I have been hearing that for 40 years.
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Burque!
3,695 posts, read 6,480,859 times
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There's a change in rain around desert cities
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:44 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,058 posts, read 60,642,093 times
Reputation: 20202
From the article:

Shepherd found a 12-14 percent increase in rainfall in the northeast suburbs of Phoenix from the pre-urban (1895-1949) to post-urban (1950-2003) periods. That is an increase, not a decrease, and the comparison period was not just 10-15 yrs ago, it was the last 58 years. I'm not saying climate change is good, mind you, I'm just saying rainfall increased, not decreased.
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Burque!
3,695 posts, read 6,480,859 times
Reputation: 743
The natural patterns are being altered by the heat island... that's what I'm reading.
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Old 06-30-2008, 10:53 PM
Status: "60th anniversary of the polio vaccine! Hail to Pitt!" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,058 posts, read 60,642,093 times
Reputation: 20202
Quote:
Originally Posted by CareFreeAZ View Post
Even the summer thunderstorm season is not as productive in the amount of rain fall like it was 10-15 years ago.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rybert View Post
The natural patterns are being altered by the heat island... that's what I'm reading.
Yes, that's what I read, too, but that's different than the quote above. And this is certainly not new news. As I said, I have heard this for 40 years.
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