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Old 09-13-2008, 03:15 AM
 
7 posts, read 15,543 times
Reputation: 14

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Hello all, this is my first post on this forum.
To give you some background my wife and I are considering immigrating to the Denver area from the UK, and are very excited at the prospect.
One major potential problem we have is that we have two domestic cats (Bengals) that are totally unlivable with if confined indoors.
Are there any areas within an hours drive of Denver that would be safe for them to go outside without the risk of mountain lions using the as a small meal?
Also, I have heard that Bengals are illegal in Denver, but not Colorado in general; how far from the city of Denver would this cover?

Thank you very much for your time, and would really appreciate some help.

Thank you,
John
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Old 09-13-2008, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,312 posts, read 6,900,917 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhnpennington View Post
Hello all, this is my first post on this forum.
To give you some background my wife and I are considering immigrating to the Denver area from the UK, and are very excited at the prospect.
One major potential problem we have is that we have two domestic cats (Bengals) that are totally unlivable with if confined indoors.
Are there any areas within an hours drive of Denver that would be safe for them to go outside without the risk of mountain lions using the as a small meal?
Also, I have heard that Bengals are illegal in Denver, but not Colorado in general; how far from the city of Denver would this cover?

Thank you very much for your time, and would really appreciate some help.

Thank you,
John
Honestly, if you can't keep your cats indoors, stay in the UK or let them learn to live indoors. It is completely irresponsible to have cats and not keep them indoors. I had a cat that was an outdoor I taught to live inside full time

Aside from the normal "your cats should be indoors because of disease, neighborhood responsibility" and the like, your cats are also food for mountian lions, coyotes and foxes that live in our area. You think I am kidding, please look up the news stories on the wildlife that does live on the Front Range of Colorado. You will also find that dogs are frequent victims of mountain lions and coyote too.

Living in Colorado means that your pets can also be dinner. If you can't be responsible enough to change them into indoor cats (I still let my cat go outside under my watch and he is fine - I let him out most of the year round but under my watch when I am there to monitor him and not let him be a problem for my nieghbors), then rethink your moving here. Cats don't have boundries like dogs do with a fence and even that's problematic for dogs sometimes.

I am not kidding.
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Old 09-13-2008, 06:55 AM
tao
 
Location: Colorado
720 posts, read 2,963,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COflower View Post
Honestly, if you can't keep your cats indoors, stay in the UK or let them learn to live indoors. It is completely irresponsible to have cats and not keep them indoors. I had a cat that was an outdoor I taught to live inside full time

Aside from the normal "your cats should be indoors because of disease, neighborhood responsibility" and the like, your cats are also food for mountian lions, coyotes and foxes that live in our area. You think I am kidding, please look up the news stories on the wildlife that does live on the Front Range of Colorado. You will also find that dogs are frequent victims of mountain lions and coyote too.

Living in Colorado means that your pets can also be dinner. If you can't be responsible enough to change them into indoor cats (I still let my cat go outside under my watch and he is fine - I let him out most of the year round but under my watch when I am there to monitor him and not let him be a problem for my nieghbors), then rethink your moving here. Cats don't have boundries like dogs do with a fence and even that's problematic for dogs sometimes.

I am not kidding.
I completely agree with this post.
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Old 09-13-2008, 07:53 AM
 
Location: USA
16,822 posts, read 8,650,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tao View Post
I completely agree with this post.
X3! New neighbors moved in near us and I noticed the let their cat roam outside at will. I told them that was not wise as there are coyotes and rattlesnakes in the area and we live in a densily populated subdivision. Well a few weeks later I noticed they had put a flyer up on the mailbox cluster saying "Fluffy" was missing. Well Fluffy wasn't missing, Fluffy was dinner.
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Old 09-13-2008, 07:54 AM
 
201 posts, read 460,720 times
Reputation: 165
Cat predation has a huge impact on declining songbird populations.

If that doesn't mean anything to you, please consider the safety of your pets and keep your cats indoors. Read up on how many domestic cats and dogs are killed and eaten by wild animals here in Colorado and think about that. Do the right thing.
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,880 posts, read 102,269,915 times
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Default On the Other Hand

We have cats and have always let them go outside. However, we have females, which tend to stick closer to home, and we always bring the cats in at night when predators are worse. The biggest danger to cats, according to my vet, is cars, which are everywhere. We live in Louisville.

I am not familiar with the breed, Bengals.
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:21 AM
 
201 posts, read 460,720 times
Reputation: 165
Does your vet have any comment on your letting your cats roam? I would think he or she would admonish you pretty seriously about that.

I'd urge you to reconsider letting your cats outside unsupervised. If not for their safety, then for the other creatures (human and not) that are adversely affected.
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,880 posts, read 102,269,915 times
Reputation: 32945
Quote:
Originally Posted by nele View Post
Does your vet have any comment on your letting your cats roam? I would think he or she would admonish you pretty seriously about that.

I'd urge you to reconsider letting your cats outside unsupervised. If not for their safety, then for the other creatures (human and not) that are adversely affected.
He says it's OK, just be aware there is a risk. He is apparently not convinced that cats are a major killer of songbirds, etc. Humans adversely affected by outdoor cats? What do you have in mind?
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:34 AM
 
201 posts, read 460,720 times
Reputation: 165
Can I ask you what vet you use?

It's pretty well-known ehat cats impact declining songbird populations in a major way. Perhaps your vet just isn't interested in the subject.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Migratory Bird Management, Pamphlets Migratory Songbird Conservation

Yes, humans can be affected. Have you ever been digging in your garden or raking leaves and encountered a pile of cat excrement? Or, perhaps you like to watch birds at your feeder, but have to deal with neighborhood cats chasing and killing those birds.

Sigh.
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,312 posts, read 6,900,917 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by nele View Post
Yes, humans can be affected. Have you ever been digging in your garden or raking leaves and encountered a pile of cat excrement? Or, perhaps you like to watch birds at your feeder, but have to deal with neighborhood cats chasing and killing those birds.

Sigh.

As a responsible cat owner, my front yard is a virtual cat litter box. Not by my cat, thank you very much.

It ticks me off to no end and I know the cats that use it (my front yard) for their poop box...while my cat is supervised and only uses his litter box. GRRRRR.

Yes, people's wayward cats are not only a flippin' nuisance, they are a health hazard.

Bengal cats aren't allowed in Denver city limits last time I checked (lame rule to me) but you need to keep your cats indoors unless otherwise supervised. Got it?

Cat = bad neighbor = lunch or dinner here for the local mountain lion or coyote.
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