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Old 10-03-2008, 11:50 PM
 
141 posts, read 423,933 times
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Default How many days where snow is on the ground.. number of "warm days" per year?

I've been researching the climate in Denver but figured I would ask here to get a better idea. I've never lived in a place where it snows before (but have been in the snow a fair amount from snowboarding in Tahoe). I don't think I could stand living somewhere that was covered in snow for months at a time so I'm wondering how is it in Denver as far as the snow staying on the ground.. is everything covered for a while or does it melt away after a few days falling?

Also, how many days are there each year that would be say 50 degrees plus, ("warm" as in warm enough to go out without a heavy jacket, etc), I know Colorado gets a lot of sun but are some of these days where the sun is shining but its still freezing out?

Thanks to anyone who can help clear this up for me.
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Old 10-04-2008, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,462 posts, read 14,030,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickca View Post
I've been researching the climate in Denver but figured I would ask here to get a better idea. I've never lived in a place where it snows before (but have been in the snow a fair amount from snowboarding in Tahoe). I don't think I could stand living somewhere that was covered in snow for months at a time so I'm wondering how is it in Denver as far as the snow staying on the ground.. is everything covered for a while or does it melt away after a few days falling?
This can vary drastically from year to year. Last two years (especially the winter of 2006-07) snow stayed on the ground practically forever, turning into an ugly black pile of gunk everywhere. Neighborhood streets got packed solid with ice with millions of pot holes everywhere. Often times the sidewalks never even get plowed. It was not a pretty sight. Other years though the ground could be totally dry for practically the whole winter, and snow might melt the day after. There's really no way to predict this.

Quote:
Also, how many days are there each year that would be say 50 degrees plus, ("warm" as in warm enough to go out without a heavy jacket, etc), I know Colorado gets a lot of sun but are some of these days where the sun is shining but its still freezing out?

Thanks to anyone who can help clear this up for me.
That all depends on you and your personal tolerances for cold. Are you a real man or a p***y? J/k. Some people will go outside in shorts and t-shirt when it's 30 degrees and sunny out! Me personally I wear just a normal fall kind of jacket most of the time when it's cold, and a ski jacket on some winter nights when it gets really cold and/or windy or when it's snowing.
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Old 10-04-2008, 12:58 AM
 
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When would the snow season be, from like December through March or something like that?
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Old 10-04-2008, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,462 posts, read 14,030,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickca View Post
When would the snow season be, from like December through March or something like that?
Ha! I'd suggest doing a search here with "weather" and "snow" as keywords-- there have been dozens of threads detailing the specifics of Denver weather. But to answer your question quickly-- anytime between right around now and the beginning of May is fair game. March and April are traditionally the snowiest months of the year, and December is historically one of the driest months of the year-- but the last two years saw quite a bit of December and January snow-- which won't melt the next day when it occurs in the dead of winter.

I would say to really want to live in Denver you have to not just be able to tolerate snow but even like the snow to an extent-- because you'll be seeing a lot of it-- 60 inches a year on average! Only major cities in the US with more snow than that are great lakes cities like Cleveland, Buffalo, Syracuse, etc.
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Old 10-04-2008, 08:36 AM
 
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The weather service does keep records of snow-on-the-ground, at the Stapelton airport site (everything except for snow is recorded at DEN, but snow stayed with the old airport). The record for continuous number of days with measurable snow on the ground is 63 - in 2007, it was close, but only made it to 61 days. This article has a list with the top ten streaks of snow-on-the-ground: Snow Close: Snow-Cover Record Unbroken - News Archive Story - KMGH Denver

The statistical annual average number of days with a high less than 32F is 22, number of days with minimum less than 32 is 156. I have little tolerance for cold, and wear a light jacket at 65F, a wool jacket below 40F, and a serious down jacket from 25F and below.
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Old 10-04-2008, 08:52 AM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,130 posts, read 58,222,176 times
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We are fast approaching the date of the first frost, average is, I believe, Oct. 9. It can snow anytime after that. They're talking about snow in the mtns. It probably won't be long. Here are some stats about snow on Halloween (an urban legend here).

Denver Halloween Snow Statistics

Halloween Weather Facts And Take Our Trick-or-Treat Quiz! - Denver Weather News Story - KMGH Denver

Plan your costume to fit over a parka!
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Old 10-04-2008, 09:10 AM
 
Location: USA
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I've cut my lawn when it was snowing, usually in the Fall. Then the sun comes out and its 60F or higher again. Its just the way it is. Once you think you've got it figures out it changes and you get a dumping of snow, and then you're playing golf the next week. Its Colorado.
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Old 10-04-2008, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
8,899 posts, read 11,733,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickca View Post
I don't think I could stand living somewhere that was covered in snow for months at a time so I'm wondering how is it in Denver as far as the snow staying on the ground.. is everything covered for a while or does it melt away after a few days falling?

Also, how many days are there each year that would be say 50 degrees plus, ("warm" as in warm enough to go out without a heavy jacket, etc), I know Colorado gets a lot of sun but are some of these days where the sun is shining but its still freezing out?

Thanks to anyone who can help clear this up for me.
If you don't think you could stand living somewhere that has constant snow-cover, then why would you even consider Colorado, where it snows? Sometimes it does stay for more than a few days, but usually not the entire winter. I've noticed that it when it snows, it will fall, just about all melt away (including snow behind shadows, and plowed piles in parking lots), and then it will snow again. I'd go as far to say it probably snows a couple times a week during winter.

After awhile, you probably won't need a jacket if it's above freezing.
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Old 10-04-2008, 02:41 PM
 
Location: CO
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sadly the snow doesnt stick around for long here
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Old 10-04-2008, 05:12 PM
 
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Forget about the snow. You should be asking about the wind and the cold nights. It will be in the teens much of the year when you leave for work. And the wind blows often and hard. And the air is dry in the winter - super dry. Cracked skin, messed up sinuses. Look into these things. Snow isn't such a big deal here.
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