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Old 12-09-2008, 03:17 AM
 
862 posts, read 2,352,950 times
Reputation: 289

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjw3 View Post
This isn't Chicago or Buffalo. Denver has a very dry climate. Just as humid heat is worse, so is humid cold.
Thank you for the input

Last edited by katzenfreund; 12-09-2008 at 07:31 PM.. Reason: don't be rude...
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Old 12-09-2008, 05:05 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,739,753 times
Reputation: 4502
Why on earth would I lie about something like that, LBear? I have nothing to gain or lose either way. And, where would you get the impression that I am not interested in facts or that it's always smoke and mirrors with me? I don't think I've had any prior interaction with you on City-Data, so why the hostility? Frankly, I don't know why my household's annual energy bill differs so dramatically from Escapcalifornia's friend, but here are the stats for my family for those who are interested:

Two adults, two kids; 2000 sq. ft., 4-bd/3 bth, slab-built, two-story house in Douglas County; relatively new with dual-paned windows; energy-efficient versions of all the standard household appliances, including an electric garage door opener; and a programmable thermostat. Our service provider in 2007 was IREA.

We did use the air conditioner occasionally during the summer if there was no breeze and oppressive heat, but it wasn't a daily practice. Because the house was in a new development, there were absolutely no shade trees. So, shortly after we moved in, we had UV coatings applied to several south and west-facing windows, which cost us about $200 in 2006. We also installed a ceiling fan in one of the upstairs bedrooms, which ran constantly. We cooked dinner at home about five days a week, using a basic electric range. Our weekly laundry amounted to about six loads, and I used the dryer for every load. Our water heater was set at 120 degrees, and we all took hot showers daily. Other than the gas fireplace debacle I described earlier, we relied on the heater to keep the house a comfortable 68-70 degrees during the winter. We did not own any televisions or stereos, and our computer was a laptop that we plugged in only for use. We kept our exterior lights on at all times, using high-efficiency bulbs, but we used normal incandescent bulbs in our interior fixtures.

Seriously, $1345! We haven't yet received our last bill of 2008, but it looks like we'll end up about the same this year.

Last edited by formercalifornian; 12-09-2008 at 06:39 AM..
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Old 12-09-2008, 06:42 AM
 
Location: in the good ol' South
865 posts, read 2,125,585 times
Reputation: 875
Humid cold is waaaaaay worse. Having lived in Rochester, NY, and Chicago, that is a chill -you -to -the- bone kind of cold. I find Denver's low temps to be a lot more bearable, and the strong sun warming things up really helps. But it's still winter, don't be fooled!

Last edited by dgfurman; 12-09-2008 at 06:43 AM.. Reason: punctuation error
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Old 12-09-2008, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
3,849 posts, read 6,753,856 times
Reputation: 1651
I grew up in CO, so I am used to the winters, which I consider mild. I have spent a winter in Minnesota, and part of a winter in Michigan, where my sister lives, and I think CO winters are a piece of cake. I grew up in a city, though, so I can't speak for what it's like in the mountain communities of CO, I'm sure they have a tougher time of it, but IMO, CO winters are mild.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bhouston77386 View Post
Did you move from an area of the country that has mild winters? What has life been like for you living in Denver were the winters are cold?

I live in Houston, so Denver winters would be considered cold for me. Have you lived in a place like Houston with a mild winter and then moved to some place cold like Denver. Did you adapt or move back to some place warmer.
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Old 12-09-2008, 08:56 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,739,753 times
Reputation: 4502
Quote:
Originally Posted by formercalifornian View Post
Why on earth would I lie about something like that, LBear? I have nothing to gain or lose either way. And, where would you get the impression that I am not interested in facts or that it's always smoke and mirrors with me? I don't think I've had any prior interaction with you on City-Data, so why the hostility? Frankly, I don't know why my household's annual energy bill differs so dramatically from Escapcalifornia's friend, but here are the stats for my family for those who are interested:

Two adults, two kids; 2000 sq. ft., 4-bd/3 bth, slab-built, two-story house in Douglas County; relatively new with dual-paned windows; energy-efficient versions of all the standard household appliances, including an electric garage door opener; and a programmable thermostat. Our service provider in 2007 was IREA.

We did use the air conditioner occasionally during the summer if there was no breeze and oppressive heat, but it wasn't a daily practice. Because the house was in a new development, there were absolutely no shade trees. So, shortly after we moved in, we had UV coatings applied to several south and west-facing windows, which cost us about $200 in 2006. We also installed a ceiling fan in one of the upstairs bedrooms, which ran constantly. We cooked dinner at home about five days a week, using a basic electric range. Our weekly laundry amounted to about six loads, and I used the dryer for every load. Our water heater was set at 120 degrees, and we all took hot showers daily. Other than the gas fireplace debacle I described earlier, we relied on the heater to keep the house a comfortable 68-70 degrees during the winter. We did not own any televisions or stereos, and our computer was a laptop that we plugged in only for use. We kept our exterior lights on at all times, using high-efficiency bulbs, but we used normal incandescent bulbs in our interior fixtures.

Seriously, $1345! We haven't yet received our last bill of 2008, but it looks like we'll end up about the same this year.
Forgot to add: Aquila was our provider of natural gas.
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Earth
1,452 posts, read 3,658,426 times
Reputation: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by dgfurman View Post
Humid cold is waaaaaay worse. Having lived in Rochester, NY, and Chicago, that is a chill -you -to -the- bone kind of cold. I find Denver's low temps to be a lot more bearable, and the strong sun warming things up really helps. But it's still winter, don't be fooled!
I spent a fair bit of time in Maine last Winter. It sucked.

Dry cold of Colorado is much more tolerable than humid cold, and of course the cold weather sucks a whole lot less when you're properly dressed.

The worst is when you work up a big sweat, regardless of how 'technical' your clothing (Outlast, GoreTex, Windstopper, etc.)...there is no such thing as a true 'warm, breatheable' garment where you will be wholly comfortable in all conditions.

Once you work up a sweat and then start cooling down, that cold creeps up fast and can really ruin your day. That sucks.
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:09 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,739,753 times
Reputation: 4502
My thermometer says it's 25 degrees right now, and I just got done shoveling the driveway wearing a ls t-shirt, light jacket, & gloves. I was perfectly comfortable, not even a bit chilly.
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:26 AM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,739,675 times
Reputation: 1462
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBear View Post
VS.
I believe "Formercalifornian" is lying.
Lbear, you need to stop the personal attacks on other posters.
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,211,765 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by formercalifornian View Post
My thermometer says it's 25 degrees right now, and I just got done shoveling the driveway wearing a ls t-shirt, light jacket, & gloves. I was perfectly comfortable, not even a bit chilly.

Must be your "WalMart thermometer". You know, officially, it's -15 with a -95 windchill
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,211,765 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBear View Post
Who says I live in southern AZ?

As far as "bills" go. Paying $150-$200 a month in gas bills while living in Denver and then the $100 a month electric bill that goes along with it as you need the air handler to push the gas-heated air.

So you are paying $250-$300+ a month in total utilities to heat a 2,300 sq.ft home while living in Denver.

"Natural-gas users on average will spend $1,216 to heat their homes in the upcoming season, which runs from November to April. That's up 43 percent from last season, the government said."

Winter heating bills set to soar - The Denver Post

That is NOT INCLUDING the cost to run the ELECTRIC air handler to push the natural gas heated air. You can add $100 a month to that cost, so it comes out to $1,816 per winter season to heat a home in Denver. That is $302.67 per month average, on a 2,300 sq.ft., well-insulated modern home. If your home is older and has over 3,000 sq.ft., then the costs almost DOUBLE.

Not to mention, then in the summer, you have to pay a high electric bill to cool the home, as Denver gets into the upper 90F's and even low 100F's in the summer. So you get whammed both in the winter and summer.

Absolute total, flat out lie! We have 2900 sq. feet, including a finished basement, and we've never had a $300 bill for gas/electric combined. Our last bill was $129. At worst, I've paid around $250 for a cold month in winter, which is pretty good from what I've heard about bills in the Northeast. And I certainly don't skimp on the heat. Plus we have a nanny in the house all day with two kids, so we have someone here 24/7.
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