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Old 07-28-2015, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
7,022 posts, read 6,641,462 times
Reputation: 7598

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Quote:
Originally Posted by step33 View Post
What if you run it on low and just pull the air in from the basement level? (Knowing that you don't want to create a draw of air that would actually pull in the exhaust fumes from the furnace - which isn't on of course. And we have a tankless hot water heater that directly vents outside so that should be safe also).

I can also picture running it briefly a little earlier and just getting that hot air out of the upstairs. Then waiting and doing as you note before trying to bring in the outside air until it's cooler?
Not sure it would work like that. Even on low it moves a tremendous amount of air. You need to have the windows open or you'll create a vacuum.
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Old 07-28-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
3,682 posts, read 1,818,735 times
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In Denver, I found that I don't need the swamp cooler to use water. I just use it to blow cool, dry night air in. Start the morning with a cool house and cruise through the day....if your insulation is good enough.

So...I use the swamp cooler....without water.
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Old 07-28-2015, 02:06 PM
 
384 posts, read 411,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Not sure it would work like that. Even on low it moves a tremendous amount of air. You need to have the windows open or you'll create a vacuum.
ok, that makes sense. I'll have to check the charts. I was thinking of having the basement windows open - but not sure that'll be enough to keep things balanced.
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Old 07-28-2015, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
3,682 posts, read 1,818,735 times
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I seem to find that the best cooling is found in the rooms with the windows open a few inches. The cool air has to pass through those rooms on their way to the cracked window.

If the windows are open too much....the cool air will simply rush out without being as effective.

About 20 years of swamp cooler experience. They work very well in Colorado with the dry air.

You can also run them during the day but you will need to use the water to cool the air down.

As for me....I try to avoid humidity for obvious reasons.
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Old 07-28-2015, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
7,022 posts, read 6,641,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoGuy View Post
In Denver, I found that I don't need the swamp cooler to use water. I just use it to blow cool, dry night air in. Start the morning with a cool house and cruise through the day....if your insulation is good enough.

So...I use the swamp cooler....without water.
Basically a backwards whole house fan.
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Old 07-29-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,626 posts, read 1,867,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveindenver View Post
The increased efficiency of A/C units (SEER rating) has made them more economical but still much more costly than a bit of water and a fan. Still though, you pay more per seer and will have to wait years (if ever) to see any upfront cost recuperation. Figure about a 1000 bucks per SEER unit above 16 for your average unit. When you figure that most units lose efficiency after 6 or 7 years even with regular maintenance it is hard to justify the cost unless you are very green or have deep pockets.

The average humidity of Denver is creeping upwards and each little increase reduces the deficiency of evaporative cooling.

The house fan is still a great way to move cold air into the house at night and coupled with good design and insulation as well as proper precautions (closing windows and using shades) can provide for comfortable days in Denver all year long.
Steve, you're wrong. Evap coolers are STILL more economical to run than the highest SEER A/C units. And if you factor in the cost of equipment, evap coolers are yet again far more economical.

Make your choice on your objectives. A/C is cold, dry. Evap is cool/moist.

I have both on my house.
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Old 07-01-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
7,022 posts, read 6,641,462 times
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Ran the whole house fan all last night. So refreshing after those 100 degree days to wake up in a 65 degree house with the windows open.

Last edited by SkyDog77; 07-01-2018 at 08:07 AM..
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Old 07-01-2018, 01:00 PM
 
1,587 posts, read 2,856,390 times
Reputation: 2014
I don't know if it's the wildfires, but for the last month or so, I've been keeping windows closed at night and running the A/C because of dust layer that builds up everywhere so quickly.
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Old 07-01-2018, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,717 posts, read 3,188,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Steve, you're wrong. Evap coolers are STILL more economical to run than the highest SEER A/C units. And if you factor in the cost of equipment, evap coolers are yet again far more economical.
Unless we're reading different posts, he didn't say anything different. He said newer ACs are "more efficient" than older, lower-SEER units, not more efficient than evaps.
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Old 07-01-2018, 09:07 PM
 
192 posts, read 196,683 times
Reputation: 237
My whole house fan is about 35 years old and not working very well. I can see the usefulness of it and wouldn't mind replacing it. Been quoted $2000 - $3000 for a new fan, vents, frame. Crazy... I won't spend that much on a fan. I would just like to replace the fan, leave the current frame and I really think the vents are ok. Fans are about $500. Anyone just replaced their fan and have any tips on what to watch out for? I can't believe it to be that difficult but the whole house fan guys make it sound impossible to replace just the fan.
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