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Old 01-14-2009, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Orange County, California
1,017 posts, read 2,699,684 times
Reputation: 469

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Hi all, maybe you could shed some light on this for me. I was checking out the Pirate's Cove website (City of Englewood : Pirates Cove) and came across their "Rain Policy":

"Rain Policy: Safety is our top priority and we will close the facility in case of severe weather, but will re-open 30 minutes after severe weather passes."

Can someone explain the "severe weather" they're talking about? Thanks in advance!
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Old 01-14-2009, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,218,153 times
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Lightning, I'd assume. Denver typically gets monsoonal thunderstorms many afternoons in Summer, so pools close at the first sign of lightning. Once the storm passes, the pool opens again.
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Old 01-14-2009, 10:38 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,783,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabolissa View Post
Hi all, maybe you could shed some light on this for me. I was checking out the Pirate's Cove website (City of Englewood : Pirates Cove) and came across their "Rain Policy":

"Rain Policy: Safety is our top priority and we will close the facility in case of severe weather, but will re-open 30 minutes after severe weather passes."

Can someone explain the "severe weather" they're talking about? Thanks in advance!
Read the umpteen threads on weather on this forum. Colorado's Front Range is subject to frequent thunderstorms during the summer months--some severe, often with large hail and frequent lightning. Tornadic thunderstorms, however, are fairly rare (but not non-existent, as the Windsor tornado demonstrated last summer). If you come from relatively thunderstorm-free California, you will likely find the Colorado climate to be relatively "violent."
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Old 01-14-2009, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,218,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Read the umpteen threads on weather on this forum. Colorado's Front Range is subject to frequent thunderstorms during the summer months--some severe, often with large hail and frequent lightning. Tornadic thunderstorms, however, are fairly rare (but not non-existent, as the Windsor tornado demonstrated last summer). If you come from relatively thunderstorm-free California, you will likely find the Colorado climate to be relatively "violent."
I love the summer thunderstorms! We didn't have enough last summer though. It's great when all of a sudden on a hot, sunny, afternoon, you notice it suddenly gets dark outside and you notice the distant thunder that gets louder and louder. Then the lightning, thunder that sounds like bombs dropping, the pouring rain... then it moves on and the sun comes back out, only it's cooler.
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Old 01-14-2009, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Orange County, California
1,017 posts, read 2,699,684 times
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Thanks for the info!


After reading this site I was reminded by a character in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button who repeatedly said, "Did I ever tell you I was struck by lightning 7 times..."
http://www.disastercenter.com/guide/thunder.html
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Old 01-14-2009, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,218,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabolissa View Post
Thanks for the info!


After reading this site I was reminded by a character in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button who repeatedly said, "Did I ever tell you I was struck by lightning 7 times..."
http://www.disastercenter.com/guide/thunder.html
He must have been from Colorado! Maybe it's because we're closer to the clouds that so many people get struck here every year. Or at least it seems like you always hear about someone getting struck by lightning in the news each summer.
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:16 PM
Status: "Celebrating 30 years as a Broker" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,885 posts, read 29,313,834 times
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I love thundersnow.

Do not golf during a thunderstorm.
Do not hide under a tree.

From personal experience, do not run around a pool to get your clothes, during a storm. I was nearly hit when I was 20. I was close enough to be charged, spent the night in the hospital and couldn't keep time on a watch for a few years.

Water conducts electricity.
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Orange County, California
1,017 posts, read 2,699,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
I love thundersnow.

Do not golf during a thunderstorm.
Do not hide under a tree.

From personal experience, do not run around a pool to get your clothes, during a storm. I was nearly hit when I was 20. I was close enough to be charged, spent the night in the hospital and couldn't keep time on a watch for a few years.

Water conducts electricity.
Wow!
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:29 PM
 
11,715 posts, read 35,879,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
I love thundersnow.
Is that a typo or a kind of weather I've never heard of?
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:41 PM
 
303 posts, read 1,416,340 times
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Thundersnow is a convective storm that had thunder and is snowing rather than raining at the surface. They do happen sometimes in the winter - I've seen (heard) them in the Boston area during big noreasters.

Thundersnow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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