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Old 09-30-2009, 03:35 AM
 
27 posts, read 61,627 times
Reputation: 33

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On visiting Denver, I immediately noticed how flat the topography is--it just sprawls out over the plains. I suppose that's good for biking, but it makes for a monotonous, dull feel. The mountains have often been obscured by haze during my visit, and there are few trees. The apartment rents are very reasonable, however, and I like some of the old houses around town. I considered living in Denver for a day or so, but I need more greenery and some hills.

 
Old 09-30-2009, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
443 posts, read 1,187,486 times
Reputation: 581
I'm visiting Denver tomorrow and I LOVE the city. I lived in Boulder for an internship in 2002 and, unfortunately, experienced the worst summer ever with smoke and 100+ degree temps from the Hayman fire...

Anyway...onto the point of this thread. I've been to Denver many times and if i had to throw any criticism its way I would have to say

1) the airport is WAY to far out of town with NO train or metro available into town...it is a NICE airport but the proximity to Denver and the rest of the front range is annoying...especially with all the new "tolled" highway areas
2) Coloradans attitude toward Texans...I worked with a guy in CO once who wouldn't even talk to me for the first few weeks because he knew I was from Texas. Stereotypes are a sign of ignorance in my opinion...there are good and bad people everywhere. I also got the feeling many in Denver/Colorado have the same type of standoff-ish attitude to Californians.
3) If I lived there I would have to say the distance to other major US cities would be annoying. Yes, you can fly to almost all major US cities nonstop from Denver but it IS expensive (not many carrier options) and it is quite far from NYC, Atlanta, LA.

Anyway, overall I think Denver has many more positive attributes than negative. If I had had the opportunity to relocate there I wouldn't have hesitated.
 
Old 09-30-2009, 08:34 PM
 
3 posts, read 9,171 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by FunkyMonk View Post
I usually don't see too much critisism or bad things written about Denver on these forums. I think that it's because overall, Denver is a pretty good city and doesn't have many major problems. But in the spirit of constructive critisism, I would like to start a thread where people can tell about things they do not like in Denver.
Im a Bicyclist. On streets faster than 20mph, I ride on the sidewalks or designated bike lanes... And on some places on my daily commute there are neither of these and some intense traffic on either side. Some stoplights are better than others.

You can see my other rants on this form.

Overall your right. Its a nice little town in the middle of no where with a majestic veiw of the moutains. I dont like Colfax and Pearl, but to fix that, Id cross the street. LOL. My #1 Complaint is that we never talk about "the dark side". Id rather not get in an argument here though, but whatever.
 
Old 10-02-2009, 10:55 AM
 
253 posts, read 770,958 times
Reputation: 120
I'm originally from Colorado, my parents still live there, however left after high school to go to college in one city and then work in another. I now live in the Northeast and people complaining about bad drivers is common every where.
However, traffic in Denver is not bad, compare this to any West Coast or Northeast city and you'll see how lucky Denver is in this respect. I think people complaining about "traffic" don't know what real traffic is.
As much as I think Denver is a great town and the pros outweigh the cons, I do have a couple dislikes.
1) As other people have said, the lack of humidity, while nice in the summer and one is not subject to the torments the Southern and Northeast parts of the country have to deal with, is terrible in winter. Humidifiers in everyroom, constant application of chapstick and lotion, scratchy throats, etc.
2) I have not read this particular complaint and did not have it when I lived there, however having lived in more formal cities, Denver is almost too laidback when it comes to appropriate dress. I've seen grown Men and women wear jeans to Church on Sundays, which is disrespectful in my opinion. People in nice/upscale restaurants will wear jeans. I can't count how many times I've been to Barolo Grill and seen men in jeans in there. Can't they put on a pair of dress slacks or khakis? If you can afford to eat there, you can afford more than jeans in your wardrobe. Where I live, people "dress" to go out and certainly don't wear jeans to church.
3) While Denver itself may be liberal and forward-thinking the suburbs are over-whelmingly Republican and conservative...which one can not claim is indicative of every other major city. The cities on the East Coast are staunch Democrats as well as the suburbs. My own father is a pretty die-hard Republican and I remember commenting how suprised I was that Colorado went Blue in the last Presidential election and he was beside himself.
Just my two cents...
 
Old 10-02-2009, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
13 posts, read 39,798 times
Reputation: 13
Mostly, I really like living here. There are just a few things I don't like- no real public transportation, the fact that we had to move to Aurora in order to afford to buy a house, and spring snow storms! That's about it.
 
Old 10-02-2009, 11:09 AM
 
1,176 posts, read 4,044,251 times
Reputation: 463
Quote:
no real public transportation, the fact that we had to move to Aurora in order to afford to buy a house, and spring snow storms!
Denver has a great public transportation network. Once you get outside of Denver county though I would agree with your statement with a few exceptions. But then public transportation generally only works well in higher density areas to begin with.
 
Old 10-03-2009, 08:15 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shino306 View Post
I'm originally from Colorado, my parents still live there, however left after high school to go to college in one city and then work in another. I now live in the Northeast and people complaining about bad drivers is common every where.
However, traffic in Denver is not bad, compare this to any West Coast or Northeast city and you'll see how lucky Denver is in this respect. I think people complaining about "traffic" don't know what real traffic is.
As much as I think Denver is a great town and the pros outweigh the cons, I do have a couple dislikes.
1) As other people have said, the lack of humidity, while nice in the summer and one is not subject to the torments the Southern and Northeast parts of the country have to deal with, is terrible in winter. Humidifiers in everyroom, constant application of chapstick and lotion, scratchy throats, etc.
2) I have not read this particular complaint and did not have it when I lived there, however having lived in more formal cities, Denver is almost too laidback when it comes to appropriate dress. I've seen grown Men and women wear jeans to Church on Sundays, which is disrespectful in my opinion. People in nice/upscale restaurants will wear jeans. I can't count how many times I've been to Barolo Grill and seen men in jeans in there. Can't they put on a pair of dress slacks or khakis? If you can afford to eat there, you can afford more than jeans in your wardrobe. Where I live, people "dress" to go out and certainly don't wear jeans to church.
3) While Denver itself may be liberal and forward-thinking the suburbs are over-whelmingly Republican and conservative...which one can not claim is indicative of every other major city. The cities on the East Coast are staunch Democrats as well as the suburbs. My own father is a pretty die-hard Republican and I remember commenting how suprised I was that Colorado went Blue in the last Presidential election and he was beside himself.
Just my two cents...
I, too, bemoan the casual dress for just about every occasion. I have seen people in jeans at just about every social function you can name: weddings, funerals (used to work for hospice so I went to a lot of funerals), the ballet, what have you.

I disagree that the suburbs are overwhelmingly Republican. The southern suburbs, particularly Douglas County are pretty conservative, but most of the burbs seem pretty middle of the road. Adams County is a long-time Democratic area, as is Boulder County. Jeffco is very diverse. I like that municipal elections are non-partisan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by steveindenver View Post
Denver has a great public transportation network. Once you get outside of Denver county though I would agree with your statement with a few exceptions. But then public transportation generally only works well in higher density areas to begin with.
I think you have to get pretty far out in the burbs before there is no decent public transportation. The suburban Park n Rides are generally full every day.
 
Old 10-03-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
13 posts, read 39,798 times
Reputation: 13
Maybe I should edit my statement- while there is public transport available, it's still mostly only good if you own a car (to get to a light rail station) or are willing to spend a long, long time getting to your destination. Before we moved to Aurora, we lived about 3 miles from my husband's job (NJ Health). If he needed to take the bus (during bad weather), it took about 50 minutes and a transfer to get there. At the time I worked in Centennial and there were no options for getting there via public transport.
 
Old 10-03-2009, 04:17 PM
 
253 posts, read 770,958 times
Reputation: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I disagree that the suburbs are overwhelmingly Republican. The southern suburbs, particularly Douglas County are pretty conservative, but most of the burbs seem pretty middle of the road. Adams County is a long-time Democratic area, as is Boulder County. Jeffco is very diverse. I like that municipal elections are non-partisan.
Most of the burbs being "middle of the road" does not compare to the Northeast staunch democratic history. Plus the data supports this, in the last presidential election, 53% of voters in CO voted for Obama, 63% of NY voted for Obama and in MD and MA it was both 62%. When just looking at NY, 10 percentage points, especially when you look at the population differences and number of registered voters between the two states, that 10 points is statistically significant.
 
Old 10-03-2009, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,446,503 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shino306 View Post
3) While Denver itself may be liberal and forward-thinking the suburbs are over-whelmingly Republican and conservative...which one can not claim is indicative of every other major city. The cities on the East Coast are staunch Democrats as well as the suburbs.
The bold is assuming that the two things in bold go hand-in-hand.

When looking at election results, it appears that Denver itself is readily blue, the exurbs (Douglas, Elbert) are readily red, and the two more "average" inner-ring counties (Arapahoe, Jefferson) are bellwethers. The one exception of note is Adams, which given it's more working-class population (in comparison to Arapahoe and Jefferson) seems to be readily blue as well.

I don't know what the East Coast has to do with CO here, but you really can't expect CO to be like the East. Although in the last election, Staten Island managed to be red, along with some suburban counties in NJ.....
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