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Old 03-31-2009, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Northglenn, Colorado
3,689 posts, read 9,452,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott5280 View Post
You might also consider the Holiday Development in North Boulder--there are some other New Urbanist communites adjacent to that project as well...The North Boulder area north and east of Wonderland Hill and even Wonerland Hill itself could be
described as liberal progressive..I used to live in Boulder's Wonderland Hill...family friendly, great schools,and very liberal neighborhood of Boulder..Prices range broadly from upper 300's for smaller condos up to over several million in area...North of that is an area called the Ridge--many newer housing options there as well--that's roughly located near highway 36 and Broadway interchange..
The other sub-division by Holiday is called Dakota Ridge Village, the homes are mostly done by Markel Homes. It is not a New Urbanist sub-division, although the Architecture is varied in style. (another one where I have homes.)
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Old 04-01-2009, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,292,270 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by the3Ds View Post
Of course your kids' friends would know you were gay...they're your kids' friends! My question was, however, how would someone know you're gay if they just drive by your house or you both drop your kids off in the morning at school? It's not like you've got a sign that says, "hi, I'm a gay parent." I am sure that you don't just walk up to perfect strangers and announce you're gay. You likely wait until your kids meet or you find yourselves at the same type of event. By the way, I am minority...I'm a female. That's not something you can hide. You seem to be hostile about this and I'll say it again, I could care less if you're gay. Lord knows there are enough children in this world with horrible straight parents...kids need love. It doesn't get more simple than that. If you and your partner are the ones to provide that love, then more power to you. Thank you for helping contribute a well adjusted (and likely very open minded) citizen to our world. That's the job of every parent, straight or gay.

Again, though...I'm still waiting for the definition of a liberal neighborhood. You said it's a place where it's residents are liberal. Am I missing something? Do liberal people have a sign or some sort of secret nod or handshake? How do you know they're liberal? They have Obama signs in their yards or they stage sit-ins to protest the latest political argument? Or is it just that they are tolerant and open minded of your lifestyle? If that's the case, I think someone would be hard pressed to find that perfect community. One of the most conservative, bible thumping, "all gays are going to hell" people I know has lived in San Francisco her whole life. I promise you that if you moved next door, she would not even look in your direction.

Most people here in Colorado just don't do the "in your face" type of liberalism that seems to be prevalent. If you were my neighbor and our kids were the same age, OF COURSE I would arrange a playdate and invite you over for BBQ. Unless you give people a reason to feel uncomfortable around you, I just don't see the kind of racism/sexism/conservativism here in Denver that I believe other people who don't live here have stereotyped us as being. When you have a great influx of outsiders and of those who have moved here, most are highly educated, you are going to find a place that is more open to alternative lifestyles.

As far as the Evangelicals go, I am not sure that their religion is all that popular here in Colorado. And you are wrong about being left alone because I am part of a heterosexual family, every week we have Mormons at our house asking us to pray with them. My recycle bin is full of their flyers. And right wing nut jobs wouldn't like us because we don't go to church, we drink alcohol, we watch rated R movies. People who use religion to judge others or make themselves feel superior will find fault with everyone. Even at church, they are secretly observing whose kids are better dressed or "reverent." You aren't being picked on...they pick on everyone.
Sorry if I came across as hostile - just trying to explain my point of view. No, we don't announce our sexual orientation to the world, but you'd be surprised how many time you have to explain your situation when you have kids. People see me with my kids and if we're talking, will ask about their "mother" or my "wife". Not their fault - the average person doesn't come across a "two daddies" situation very often!

I don't really know what you're getting at regarding the definition of a liberal neighborhood. I know Stapleton is liberal because they have a liberal neighbors organization, in the last election Obama signs outnumbered McCain 30 to one, and we're close enough to many neighbors to know that every household on our block voted for Obama, and are Democrats. The main plus for me is that I live somewhere that's tolerant of gay people. The entire neighborhood had a baby shower for us with over 75 attendees before our twins were born last year - and considering I have an intolerant, evangelical family that told me I'm going to hell and our having babies was "satan's work", that really meant a lot to me. But other than that, beer and barbeque goes down the same for liberals as it does for conservatives. We don't discuss politics daily or anything like that - who would want to?

A few months ago we had Jehova's Witnesses come to our door. My first thought was, these guys are really in the wrong neighborhood for finding converts! I had a baby in my arms so the guy asked something about my wife, so I explained I had a partner - you could about hear the gears turning in his head, then he and the other guy with him left fast. On the downside, our neighborhood is often targeted by environmentalists and solicitors of liberal causes, which can be annoying.
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Old 04-01-2009, 08:09 AM
 
694 posts, read 1,793,680 times
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Well Denverian, should you or your partner ever get a job in Boulder and need to be closer for commuting reasons, you would all be very welcome here in Bradburn
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,292,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradburn1 View Post
Well Denverian, should you or your partner ever get a job in Boulder and need to be closer for commuting reasons, you would all be very welcome here in Bradburn
Definitely would consider it! I actually love Boulder and would like to live there, but unless we had jobs there, forget it. Plus we'd have to downgrade our house to move there, I believe. But it's a fun place to spend a Saturday afternoon.
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:48 AM
 
21 posts, read 79,203 times
Reputation: 20
Bradburn sounds like a great place, I was on the site and it's refreshing to hear the community vibe they've tried to create is actually working. One of the things giving me angst about leaving where we are is that we live in an old neighborhood where a couple times a week we end up on a neighbor's front porch drinking wine, everyone knows each other and looks out for each other, there are no less than 10 restaurants we can walk to, etc.

I am most appreciative to everyone who gave me so many good tips on this thread. And Denverian, I particularly appreciate your thoughts and well thought-reasoned posts. If a move to Portland is ever in order, we have lovely neighborhoods here where you would feel at home. At my daughter's pre-school, 3/12 kids have same sex parents. I wouldn't say that's typical, but it's not uncommon.

Thanks again all.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,292,270 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmsegal View Post
Bradburn sounds like a great place, I was on the site and it's refreshing to hear the community vibe they've tried to create is actually working. One of the things giving me angst about leaving where we are is that we live in an old neighborhood where a couple times a week we end up on a neighbor's front porch drinking wine, everyone knows each other and looks out for each other, there are no less than 10 restaurants we can walk to, etc.

I am most appreciative to everyone who gave me so many good tips on this thread. And Denverian, I particularly appreciate your thoughts and well thought-reasoned posts. If a move to Portland is ever in order, we have lovely neighborhoods here where you would feel at home. At my daughter's pre-school, 3/12 kids have same sex parents. I wouldn't say that's typical, but it's not uncommon.

Thanks again all.
Thanks! Portland is on my "places I would live" list for sure. One thing I've always wondered though, it the weather better than Seattle? Meaning, is it less dreary in winter and warmer in Summer? That's what I think, but never had someone confirm it.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:56 AM
 
10,720 posts, read 17,451,932 times
Reputation: 9920
Denver is what I call psuedo-liberal. It's kind of a mix between Salt Lake City and Seattle. You have both really liberal elements and really conservative elements at the same time; it's kind of strange that way. It's not truly liberal like the west coast. It provides the impression that it is liberal because it somewhat resembles the Pacific northwest. You see a lot of granola and outdoorsy people so you think "Hey It feels like Portland or Seattle" around here. Then you realize the people are pretty right-wing about certain topics while they are really liberal about certain topics. Colorado Springs is a bastion of right wing conservatism and unfortunately that presence leaks into the Denver area. It's an isolated community. There is not a major city or anything that is drivable from there. Unlike the coasts that feel like they are a part of something, Denver can feel a little creepy in that sense.

Voting for Obama doesn't really make a place liberal. A lot of conservative places voted for Obama because of disatisfaction with the economy and desire to see change. If you want to see what places are liberal, check out the last Presidential election. Colorado voted Bush in 2004, 2000 and Dole in 1996(the year nearly everyone voted for Clinton including Louisiana and Arizona)

Last edited by azriverfan.; 04-01-2009 at 11:07 AM..
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Old 04-01-2009, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Governor's Park/Capitol Hill, Denver, CO
1,536 posts, read 5,520,403 times
Reputation: 1131
Interesting perception azriverfan, but you missed the boat based on Denver history and how we vote. Since it's founding Denver has constantly been progressive, the burbs and to the south, not so much. Molly Brown is a prime example for she fought for the rights of not just women but children and miners as well. She introduced big money to Denver (Vanderbuilt, Carnegie, Rockerfeller) from the east coast as they supported her efforts to protect workers and those in need, blue collar. This wasn't in just Denver but internationally as well. Check out her history here and in France.

Our voting speaks for itself, Hispanic and Black Mayors (Pena, Webb) but the state governorships alternate between the two parties. You can't tell if a city is 'psudo-liberal' based on the way folks dress or what they eat, but it is evident in their political history. Though we are not entirely liberal or democratic, not city is, our history does not lean to the right. Take a historical peek, it will be enlightening.
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Old 04-01-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
2,212 posts, read 4,608,316 times
Reputation: 2363
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Sorry if I came across as hostile - just trying to explain my point of view. No, we don't announce our sexual orientation to the world, but you'd be surprised how many time you have to explain your situation when you have kids. People see me with my kids and if we're talking, will ask about their "mother" or my "wife". Not their fault - the average person doesn't come across a "two daddies" situation very often!

I don't really know what you're getting at regarding the definition of a liberal neighborhood. I know Stapleton is liberal because they have a liberal neighbors organization, in the last election Obama signs outnumbered McCain 30 to one, and we're close enough to many neighbors to know that every household on our block voted for Obama, and are Democrats. The main plus for me is that I live somewhere that's tolerant of gay people. The entire neighborhood had a baby shower for us with over 75 attendees before our twins were born last year - and considering I have an intolerant, evangelical family that told me I'm going to hell and our having babies was "satan's work", that really meant a lot to me. But other than that, beer and barbeque goes down the same for liberals as it does for conservatives. We don't discuss politics daily or anything like that - who would want to?

A few months ago we had Jehova's Witnesses come to our door. My first thought was, these guys are really in the wrong neighborhood for finding converts! I had a baby in my arms so the guy asked something about my wife, so I explained I had a partner - you could about hear the gears turning in his head, then he and the other guy with him left fast. On the downside, our neighborhood is often targeted by environmentalists and solicitors of liberal causes, which can be annoying.
I'm glad to know you have found a nice place to live where you feel comfortable. That's really the important thing, right? I too came from a "bible thumping" family who took me to church twice on Sunday, once on Wednesday and to more church camps, teen groups, etc than I can count. When I told them I was heading to a liberal, Catholic University, my mother nearly fainted and my dad told me I would have to do it on my own financially. When my daughter was born, I was 35 (considered an AMA-Advanced Maternal Age) and I was able to have tests to see if the baby would have Downs Syndrome. I took the tests and my husband and I were prepared to abort the baby if the results indicated our child would be born with a life-altering disability. Some would argue with me about my reproductive rights but I know what's best for me and my family. My mother called me the morning of my test telling me that she was going to pray for me. Yikes. I think most of us have our own issues to deal with. My husband's family is considered very prominent in the Mormon Church and my husband is the black sheep in the family for quitting the church. They seem like a very moral, well adjusted family on the outside but the inner workings of their relationships make it seem like an episode of Melrose Place.

I think the term "liberal" and "progressive" just rankled me a little because I am so sick of these labels. People who voted for Obama aren't necessarily "liberal." The tide for Obama included many people who would consider themselves Republican and conservative. The reality is that GWB messed things up pretty bad and there was a backlash against him in this election. Obama didn't just win because of the registered Democrats. Many people went across party lines as a statement to their own leaders that they had lost their way. I am a registered Independent who votes all over the map. I consider myself more liberal on social issues but very financially conservative. If you were my neighbor and I knew you were gay, I would still treat you the same as I treat my other neighbors. I think there are closed minded people all over the place and Colorado is no exception. I have noticed, however, that Colorado (at least the Denver area) leans more liberal on social issues than most places I've lived before (except Seattle).

My initial post was pretty hostile towards the question because as a parent myself, my first and foremost priority for finding a house was "good schools." Second was a place we could afford. It seemed like the question was posted as she was trying to look "oh so intellectual" and only wanted to look at places that reminded her of her "ultra liberal" area of Portland. That annoyed me.
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Old 04-01-2009, 11:40 AM
 
694 posts, read 1,793,680 times
Reputation: 479
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmsegal View Post
One of the things giving me angst about leaving where we are is that we live in an old neighborhood where a couple times a week we end up on a neighbor's front porch drinking wine, everyone knows each other and looks out for each other, there are no less than 10 restaurants we can walk to
This senario describes Bradburn fairly exactly, except I think the last time I counted you could walk to 15 restaurants (although that does include fast food such as Wendy's, Chipolte, Smoothie Shop, Starbucks,Einstiens). Everyone knows each other here and we socialize pretty much all the time. I was at bookclub last night, am headed over to a neighbor's later today, am going to a Bradburn ladies' movie on Sat. Once the weather improves (which should happen shortly) we have weekly park parties for the entire neighborhood which basically involve the adults standing around drinking wine or beer while the kids run around the park playing, and then movie nights in the park as well about twice a month in summer etc...

Bradburn has a sense of community unlike anything else in my experience, and is the reason I never want to move again. Ever. We didn't even know of or expect the community aspect when we moved here. We moved here initially because both my husband and I hate driving, and I liked the design of the neighborhood because they actually had houses that had some charm and weren't all beige!

One of the reasons I post on this forum about my neighborhood is I like having cool new neighbors who also want to be in a real community. I've met about five different couples through this board, so far four of them have moved in and love it here, the fifth is in the process of selling their home in another state and then will move out here.
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