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Old 04-21-2009, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,670,324 times
Reputation: 5338

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DenverAztec View Post
Good question, and the last time I was asked this was by a Phoenician, you must have spent too much time down there?
Wow, strange coincidence. And there's probably something to it.... I think living in Phoenix for four years, especially moving there at the critical age of 18 permanently warped my view of architecture. Now when I come back to Denver I notice all sorts of things I never would have thought twice about growing up.

Quote:
If you think back to who was building these homes and neighborhoods, you have to consider where they came from. Europeans and the rich from back east. Given that Denver was well known for major flooding along the Platt River, the Highlands had great appeal. However, even in the Highlands the lakes (Rocky Mtn., Berekely, Lakeside's lake) could all overflow and flood the neighborhoods prior to drainage systems and paved roads. I don't know if any on of the lake up in that area are man made. But even a simple rain or especially quick snow melt could cause flooding of your property and home. So you will see most historic homes throughout Denver with a built up hill 2 to 3 feet above the street level.
That makes a lot of sense. It's hard for me to imagine Denver flooding since it hasn't happened in my lifetime but I know that there were at least three (or more?) major floods when the Cherry Creek or South Platte flooded, one as recently as the 1960s. I like how Highlands literally is a little bit higher up rather than down in the flat flood plain of the South Platte River. But I guess the kinds of building practices were used up there.

Now I have another question, with the interest in historical preservation in general, is it primarily that people feel that Victorian (or whatever period is in question) architecture is aesthetically beautiful or is it more about wanting to preserve a sense of "history."

I'm definitely not opposed to new architecture, new development in principle, however I completely agree with you that most of the rebuilds you see in neighborhoods like these look like crap. I'm not sure what this style is called (modern?, postmodern? industrial?) but I think this style of architecture looks like a piece of garbage:



If they absolutely have to tear down an old house, why can't they at least put something back in its place that looks normal? Or at least something that resembles a *home*, instead of trying to make their house look like a mini Denver art museum addition? What is the social statement the people who live in this house or the architect who built it trying to make? I don't know what that school of architecture is called, but I think it sucks.
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Old 04-21-2009, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Governor's Park/Capitol Hill, Denver, CO
1,536 posts, read 5,510,122 times
Reputation: 1131
quote=vegaspilgrim; Wow, strange coincidence. And there's probably something to it.... I think living in Phoenix for four years, especially moving there at the critical age of 18 permanently warped my view of architecture. Now when I come back to Denver I notice all sorts of things I never would have thought twice about growing up.

The other thing that stands out about Denver is all the alley ways. Almost all the neighborhoods have them, many cities our size and larger don't. Oh, and the cross-corral pedestrian walkability with each intersection downtown. What downtown do you know of where you can walk right across the middle of the intersection? That was actually invented here.

That makes a lot of sense. It's hard for me to imagine Denver flooding since it hasn't happened in my lifetime but I know that there were at least three (or more?) major floods when the Cherry Creek or South Platte flooded, one as recently as the 1960s. I like how Highlands literally is a little bit higher up rather than down in the flat flood plain of the South Platte River. But I guess the kinds of building practices were used up there.

The building of Chatfield and Cherry Creek reservoirs prevent the flooding now, hence all the building in the CPV since. The reservoirs were built in the late 60s/early 70s I believe.

Now I have another question, with the interest in historical preservation in general, is it primarily that people feel that Victorian (or whatever period is in question) architecture is aesthetically beautiful or is it more about wanting to preserve a sense of "history."

Both really! The craftsmanship and detail has not been replicated since the Victorian era but some have tried. Victorian was the main style used when Denver was founded and your status could be revealed in the size and amount of detail of your home, not to mention material used. Denver has the second most Victorian structures outside San Francisco still standing, but in Denver you will find more stone used due to our weather. Most cities torn down their Victorian warehouses to build glass giants in their core or fires consumed large sections, Chicago is an example.

The historical preservation does speak volumes on its own, like collecting rare coins or jewelry, a city holds precious to their historic building. Hence, you have a Denver and a Colorado Historical Society. Sadly, if a home is not on the protect list of either organization, then it can be razed. More store fronts are Italiate or Vernacular is style and many car dealerships and theaters morphed into Art Deco (Paramount, Mayan, car dealerships on South Broadway). Few people thought of Deco as appealing for a home but for a warehouse or entertainment venue, it was perfect. Deco is my favorite but rare in the western states.

I'm definitely not opposed to new architecture, new development in principle, however I completely agree with you that most of the rebuilds you see in neighborhoods like these look like crap. I'm not sure what this style is called (modern?, postmodern? industrial?) but I think this style of architecture looks like a piece of garbage:

This building is on 32nd, so it has a store front with a residence/office on top, commercial usage modern. It did not try to fit in with the surrounding home, but rather self satisfying. Thus, an eye sore of a structure.

If they absolutely have to tear down an old house, why can't they at least put something back in its place that looks normal? Or at least something that resembles a *home*, instead of trying to make their house look like a mini Denver art museum addition? What is the social statement the people who live in this house or the architect who built it trying to make? I don't know what that school of architecture is called, but I think it sucks.

Sometimes it is the choice of the owner/designer that is like getting a bad tattoo. You may love it but most folks will hate it. The Sloan's Lake residents but a halt to the razing and new structure development before it transformed their area into what has happened to Hill Top, Cherry Creek North and LoHi. I will post LoHi next and some of them are really cool looking. But whole entire blocks have been transformed and resemble nothing from the past and makes one wonder what, if any of them, can outlast a true Victorian.

Last edited by DenverAztec; 04-21-2009 at 03:21 PM..
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Old 04-21-2009, 03:08 PM
 
Location: UK
296 posts, read 729,149 times
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Wow, what great photos - that looks like a lovely area.
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Old 04-21-2009, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Denver
274 posts, read 1,362,022 times
Reputation: 298
Very nice, Mr. Aztec.

Anybody tried this BOA Asian Mexican comfort food place? Is it any good?
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Old 04-21-2009, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Vermont, grew up in Colorado and California
5,296 posts, read 6,175,929 times
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Thanks for another great tour.
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Old 04-21-2009, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Governor's Park/Capitol Hill, Denver, CO
1,536 posts, read 5,510,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MobyLL View Post
Very nice, Mr. Aztec.

Anybody tried this BOA Asian Mexican comfort food place? Is it any good?
Diego's use to be in this spot and I really miss it. I have to warm up to the idea of a split menu consisting of Asian/Mexican to try the new place. Let me know if you are up for an experiment and we could try it!

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Old 04-21-2009, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,670,324 times
Reputation: 5338
Quote:
Originally Posted by DenverAztec View Post
Diego's use to be in this spot and I really miss it. I have to warm up to the idea of a split menu consisting of Asian/Mexican to try the new place. Let me know if you are up for an experiment and we could try it!

That kind of reminds me of a place in Phoenix called Chino Bandito (no joke). Can't say I've ever eaten there.
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Old 04-21-2009, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Governor's Park/Capitol Hill, Denver, CO
1,536 posts, read 5,510,122 times
Reputation: 1131
LOL, is Chino Bandito close to the Chino Prison? Oops, that is L.A.'s Chino area not AZ.
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Old 04-22-2009, 08:12 AM
Status: "Celebrating 30 years as a Broker" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,882 posts, read 29,310,762 times
Reputation: 7085
Please count them for us JJ - San Fran, NOLA, Chicago, England, Melbourne, Denver...structures still standing.

It makes sense that cities that experienced a economic/housing boom in the 1920's would have structures of the era.

There are some scrapes - Victorian style in Denver. I have seen some in Wash Park, Park Hill & Bonnie Brae.
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Old 04-22-2009, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
3,530 posts, read 8,720,793 times
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I really like those pics. Makes me think that Denver's not all that bad. JOKING!! But really, these areas are the places I loved to live in and still miss. Thanks Denver for showing us the neat parts of Denver.
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