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Old 04-30-2009, 05:34 PM
 
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Which neighborhoods would you consider the most walkable in Denver? My husband and I are moving to Denver at the end of the summer for his job and we just did a scouting trip last weekend looking for neighborhoods we would want to live in. It was tough as we have been car free and living in San Francisco's North Beach neighborhood for almost 10 years. I found the Highlands and Platt Park to have the best neighborhood retail strips as well as Uptown but found the city really lacked. Any other places we may have missed?
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:06 PM
 
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I would suggest the Old Englewood, on Hampden, near the Englewood Station. You will have excellent bus service on Broadway. Also, there is good shopping nearby.You many also consider further down on the Southwest Line, Old Town Littleton.

Platte Park neighborhood near the Louisiana/Pearl Station would be amenable in a renewed up classed older neighborhood. It is also close to Washington Park neighborhood which certainly will meet your needs--to us, it is expensive, to you from San Fran, probably not.

Livecontent
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Old 05-01-2009, 08:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by karievag View Post
Which neighborhoods would you consider the most walkable in Denver? My husband and I are moving to Denver at the end of the summer for his job and we just did a scouting trip last weekend looking for neighborhoods we would want to live in. It was tough as we have been car free and living in San Francisco's North Beach neighborhood for almost 10 years. I found the Highlands and Platt Park to have the best neighborhood retail strips as well as Uptown but found the city really lacked. Any other places we may have missed?
Washington Park, Baker, City Park, Capitol Hill, Cheesman Park, Governors Park.
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Old 05-01-2009, 04:06 PM
 
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Thanks for the suggestions...we'll be heading back to Denver in June for more scouting/housing search. Also came across some great pics of a nice little retail strip in the Berkeley neighborhood North of the Highlands. Any suggestions about that area...I haven't checked it out yet? I just really want most of my services to be within a 10 min. walk and be able to commute downtown via bus or rail easily. I appreciate Baker being along Broadway but the large busy street turns me off a bit...looking for something more quaint and "neighborhoody".
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Old 05-01-2009, 06:05 PM
 
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Not sure Wash Park is that walkable, many services require a car.

Add Stapleton to the list. Parts of everywhere really it just depends on the precise location.
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Old 05-01-2009, 06:23 PM
 
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I'm a native of Chicago, and Denver is no Chicago. That said, it is an awesome city. I think it has a great urban environment, with lots of beautiful old neighborhoods, with local amenities (shops and restaurants) within walking distance. In Chicago, you will have dozens of choices in a given neighborhood, in Denver, you may have only a dozen, but it seems sufficient. Public transit is excellent. Last time I was there (in January), I stayed on the southeast side of the city at Hampden and Monaco without a car. The bus and light rail worked just fine. I was staying in an all suite hotel, so I even went to buy groceries without having a car. It seems that the majority of routes run every half hour outside of rush hour, and they are generally on time. In Chicago most routes theoretically run every ten or fifteen minutes, but you can spend an hour on the corner waiting for a bus to show up. I would rather have them run less frequently, but reliably. I would love to move to Denver to enjoy a great city without all the hassles of Chicago, which is only a cheap 2 hour flight away if I need it.
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Old 05-03-2009, 04:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by karievag View Post
Thanks for the suggestions...we'll be heading back to Denver in June for more scouting/housing search. Also came across some great pics of a nice little retail strip in the Berkeley neighborhood North of the Highlands. Any suggestions about that area...I haven't checked it out yet? I just really want most of my services to be within a 10 min. walk and be able to commute downtown via bus or rail easily. I appreciate Baker being along Broadway but the large busy street turns me off a bit...looking for something more quaint and "neighborhoody".
The Berkeley neighborhood and many parts of Northwest Denver are now the "in" places to live. Berkeley is serviced by buses that run east and west along 38th and 44th. They are, of course, Route 38 and Route 44; running very often and late. There is no rail service, nor will there be rail service to this part of Denver.

Shopping along Tennyson, north of 38th, are small shops, some have been in the area for years and now there are new little shops as a result of gentrification. Tennyson, hit West 38th South and goes into a former large amusement park that was moved and this old site has been redeveloped. It is called Highland Gardens. It has very nice housing and some good shopping, specifically Sunflower Market.

Living around Tennyson, you can walk or take the bus to Sheridan where there is Grocery Shopping, King Soopers, on the Corner and Target just south at Edgewater, at 20th and Sheridan. This is also across Sheridan from Sloan's Lake, a very nicely developing area. It also provides a good Bus, Route 51, and that will connect to the future rail stations along Sheridan which will be at Colfax (West 15) and at 59nd and Sheridan. but presently it ends at Englewood Station on the Southwest Line.

Past Sheridan you will be in the City of Wheat Ridge which has developed, very nicely, the older area, along west 38th. You will find nice little shops and restaurants, that have been down there for years. Further west on 38h will take you into more expensive residential and Lutheran Hospital, just past Wadsworth. It will take you into the nice neighborhood of Applewood, at Youngfield.

I do not want to neglect West 38th, east of Tennyson, which leads toward Downtown Denver. This area is a great area with some nice shops and restaurants, traditional the old Italian of Denver, now more Hispanic but presently attracted new European and Asian Residence. There will be a new Rail Station, north of 38th, near Fox in the future.

Berkeley you will be just north of the West Highland Neighborhood, centered on Lowell and West 32nd. This is a popular gentrification area with many shops and restaurants. You will also be close the redeveloped Highland which is east of Federal, just west of Downtown.

I do like Berkeley--I live just about 2-3 miles north, in Arvada, up Tennyson. It has tremendous parks with Lakes, which is rare in Colorado. It is also in an area of Denver, that gives you the benefits of living in a City but at the same time your are close to the more extensive basic shopping, you have in the suburbs. I go to this area often and it is a very safe area that is multicultural with long term residents but is now attracting young vibrant professionals with children. Everyday, I see people walking, pushing strollers, jogging and just enjoying the many parks. I have lived in this area for many years and I have seen the old, make way for some new, but maintaining the characteristics of the area. You really cannot go wrong with this area--but get there now, because it is becoming more expensive quickly.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 05-03-2009 at 04:55 PM..
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Old 05-05-2009, 03:49 PM
 
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Thanks Livecontent!! Super helpful!
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Old 05-05-2009, 09:54 PM
 
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The Berkeley neighborhood and many parts of Northwest Denver are now the "in" places to live.
They were cheap for a while but I don't think they have ever been the "in places to live."

That part of town is a total PITA to get to the rest of the city from. If you work in the area or west .. eh deal with it. If you don't I just can't see why you would deal with the hassle.
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Old 05-05-2009, 10:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by steveindenver View Post
They were cheap for a while but I don't think they have ever been the "in places to live."

That part of town is a total PITA to get to the rest of the city from. If you work in the area or west .. eh deal with it. If you don't I just can't see why you would deal with the hassle.

Why are you so negative???? Certainly NW Denver is showing a great resurgence and is becoming a new "in" place. I never said it was always an 'in" place but it is now, without a doubt--just get out and look. However, it was always the "in" place for the natives, who knew a good place to live in traditional simple neighborhoods, as well as some of the "well to do" developments that were always part of the west side---look north of Sloan's Lake and tell me the story of these fine expensive homes.

Many people live in this area and it is a good area to live and to get easily downtown. The West Colfax bus, route 16, is one of the major bus routes with a schedule that is often and includes an express bus. In addition, there are numerous other buses that run west to east along the street grids that go directly and quickly downtown.

All the bridges over I-25 and the Platte have been rebuilt in the last 10 years and have open up the whole Platte Valley. It has given easing access to/from NW Denver. In addition, the Highland neighborhood has a new pedestrian bridge over the HWY. and brings this neighborhood in the Platte Valley--again. And I mean again, because the Valley Highway, I-25, was not all good, it did impact the area by destroying many connecting neighborhoods to the central core. Now, with redevelopment of the Platte Valley we can now connect these neighborhoods more effectively and make better use of the whole area.

We also have to look at this area has having many of the denser older inner suburbs of Denver which have many of the characteristics which you constantly expose, that is walkable neighborhood, close to shopping and good transportation. In addition, it has the whole area of the NW Denver and these suburbs have some unique homes, parks, long established restaurants and shops, that are certainly not cookie-cutter, as you hate. These older suburbs have traditionally served many long term and native residents. It merges nicely into these parts of Denver.

In addition, this area through Lakewood will soon have a brand new rail line running quickly downtown, just south of Auraria, and the Gold Line from Arvada will be built.

Denver is not just your neighborhood of East Colfax, an area which I find exciting and important to Denver. It is a diversity of areas and neighborhoods that can give people many varied choices to live.

Again, why are you so negative??? Learn to
Livecontent
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