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Old 05-28-2010, 08:09 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,053 times
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My daughter has been accepted to both colleges but is having a hard time choosing which one would be best for her. She loves the "vibe" of Colorado Springs and the outdoorsy local but likes UCDs academics and college campus. So stuck between a rock and a hard place she's seeking my advice (surprise,surprise!) and since I have no idea what either town/school is about I'm seeking advice.

Which town is best for an active 23 year old (and dog)?
Which towns job market is better?
Which schools academics are better? (her major is criminal justice)
Which school would be best for an older transfer student?

Should I tell her to go where she's happy or where she will get the best education?!

Thank you in advance for the feedback!
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Old 05-28-2010, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Just to clarify, you are Colorado residents (in-state tution), right?

CU Boulder is better than either one, with the exception of a handful of programs that are offered at CU Denver/ Health Sciences that aren't offered at Boulder. Outside of the Front Range, neither UCD nor UCCS are known for anything. They're both strictly "locals" colleges that serve commuters from their respective metro areas. Both have a lot of older and "non-traditional" students. UCD is right across the street from the urban action of downtown Denver. The natural setting of the UCCS campus, on the beautiful Austin Bluffs with 360 degree astounding views, is awesome.

I think it comes down to which city would your daughter rather live in long term? If she likes Colorado Springs and could see herself settling down there, then UCCS would be a great choice. Of course, Denver has a way bigger, badder economy and career options, but there are opportunities to be had in both cities, and as a UCCS alum she'll be privy to the job opportunities the Springs does have, through networking and campus recruiting... whereas someone coming from Denver might get rejected from Colo Springs jobs as a non-local. And vice-versa (although a lot of Denver employers skip over UCD for on campus recruiting and go to CU Boulder, CSU, DU instead). Trust me, I know what I'm talking about, I've learned the hard way on this one. Employment goes hand in hand with geography. So if I were her I'd go with the city she feels the most comfortable in. Sounds like that is Colorado Springs.

Last edited by vegaspilgrim; 05-28-2010 at 09:31 PM..
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Old 05-28-2010, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,735,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ucduccs View Post
Should I tell her to go where she's happy or where she will get the best education?!
Maybe you should tell her to go to the place with the best Mexican food.

Does one go to college to be happy, or to get the best education?
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Old 05-29-2010, 04:08 PM
 
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She also got into Boulder but doesn't want to go there. She's afraid that being an older, working student in a mainly college town she would feel out of place. Is this true? Should I have her look closer at Boulder?
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Old 05-29-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Denver 'burbs
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Boulder is a college town but certainly has more than college students living there. Not to mention I'm sure CU has it's share of "non-traditional" students....I'd think the COL would be significantly different than in Colorado Springs though (if that matters). All other things being equal, I'd choose the one with the better program for what she's majoring in. You can live anywhere for a few years if it helps you achieve your goal.
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ucduccs View Post
She also got into Boulder but doesn't want to go there. She's afraid that being an older, working student in a mainly college town she would feel out of place. Is this true? Should I have her look closer at Boulder?
23 years old isn't old! And not all undergrad college students live the "college student" lifestyle, which is really centered on the freshman year anyway. CU has a lot of grad programs too, it's not just a 4-year undergrad college-- she could socialize with grad students who might be around that age. I'd assume that Boulder, being the state's flagship university, would have the best program. Even living in Denver and commuting to CU Boulder could be an idea.
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,668,510 times
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Whoaaa.... just read your reply on the Colorado Springs thread-- critical piece of information here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ucduccs View Post
Thank you for all of your responses, I will be printing them out for her to read. She's lucky in that money is not an issue, her father and I told her wherever she got in she could go. We live in California but she has her heart set on Colorado.
In that case, of the CU's, there's really only one option if she's going to go to school in Colorado-- CU Boulder. The other campuses definitely have their time and place, but for someone moving from out of state, paying out of state tuition rates (which are sky high, although you say the finances are not an issue), there's really zero reason to look at either UCD or UCCS. That would be like me as a Colorado resident wanting to live in California, getting into UCLA but opting for Cal State LA instead.
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Old 05-31-2010, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Greater NYC
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Agree with the above; if money is not an issue, I would choose CU Boulder, hands down. Level of education and the town itself create a unique blend that few others can offer. I was married and 22 went I was there and fit in just fine. Additionally, I -- myself -- paid to go there with no help from my parents and it was 100% worth it. Also... I'm a native California if that matters in the least.
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Old 05-31-2010, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,876 posts, read 102,269,915 times
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I, too, agree with vegaspilgrim. UCD and UCCS are primarily for the in-state student. Lots of part-time, working students, etc. Not that there's anything wrong with that, and I have a couple of relatives who graduated from each, but an out of state student planning full-time study should really get more "bang for their buck". There are plenty of students in Boulder in their 20s, due in part to there being a large grad student population, and also to there being more students these days doing what your daughter is doing, ie, putting off school a few years.
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Old 06-02-2010, 11:44 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
1,991 posts, read 3,479,276 times
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Just curious if folks have heard of this sort of thing much before- an out of state student choosing a Colorado school targeting the job market in the Boulder/Denver/CS area. You don't really hear about it much in general across the country, but since many state schools end up with their students employed primarily in that state, it seems pretty "strategic" to go to a school for that purpose. Of course, a non-traditional student is going to generally have a better idea of where they want to live longer term than an 18 year old fresh out of high school is, which may be why it doesn't seem to be that common a strategy, or why it may be more common for graduate students than for undergrads.

I just find the whole notion particularly strategic and forward thinking. I have a young son whom I will down the line get to make college plans with/for, so this kind of thinking piques my interest.
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