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Unread 06-29-2007, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Austin
3,979 posts, read 4,648,919 times
Reputation: 1927
Default Abandoned Detroit

First off, I would like to apologize in advance to anyone who may be offended by my question. I know residents of many cities have great pride in where thie live, and I don't know if that's the case in Detroit, but here it goes:

I will be driving through Detroit later this summer and I would like to explore the city and witness firsthand what has happened to it over the past 40 years. Detroit is a very interesting city in that it shows what could potentially happen to more prosperous cities during economic downturns. I would like to know what areas and streets I can drive down to see the most abandonment (homes and businesses). I find it eerily fascinating, for some reason. I know the East Side has a lot of empty lots, but where are the shells of buildings still standing? I'm especially fascinated by neighborhoods with old mansions that have been abandoned.

Thanks in advance.
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Unread 06-29-2007, 11:05 AM
 
40 posts, read 293,911 times
Reputation: 27
Even though you're interested in the abandonment in Detroit, I would also suggest that you visit some of the nicer areas (Downtown, Midtown, Corktown, Riverfront) as well. These areas have greatly improved but still contain some abandoned buildings. Two buildings I highly suggest you visit are the Michigan Central Station and this building in Brush Park nicknamed Slumpy:



For more info, go here: Forgotten Detroit
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Unread 06-29-2007, 11:43 AM
 
Location: biggest little place in America
1,029 posts, read 1,931,392 times
Reputation: 506
I would start at a website called the Fabulous Ruins of Detroit.

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Unread 06-29-2007, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, MI
3,490 posts
Reputation: 466
Cityscape Detroit > Detroit Neighborhoods is a great map showing the different neighborhoods of Detroit.

Have fun...and definately be careful.

Last edited by jeffncandace; 07-02-2007 at 02:43 PM.. Reason: deleted questionable thread
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Unread 07-02-2007, 01:28 PM
 
7 posts, read 36,064 times
Reputation: 11
I recently moved to detroit suburbs. Last friday was my first trip to detroit to go watch the Tiger's game. It feels very empty and very "ghetto" I hope the city do something about that since it is a great town.

Eddie
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Unread 07-02-2007, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, MI
3,490 posts
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie0101 View Post
I recently moved to detroit suburbs. Last friday was my first trip to detroit to go watch the Tiger's game. It feels very empty and very "ghetto" I hope the city do something about that since it is a great town.

Eddie
You're not alone Eddie. It's obvious just from the fabulous architecture that Detroit used to be a beautiful city. "The Paris of the West" it was called. It can be great again, but not without a ton of work!

What part of the 'burbs did you end up landing in?
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Unread 07-02-2007, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,356 posts, read 4,646,720 times
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A good part of Detroit to start off on your "morbid tour" of Motown would be the Delray district of Detroit which is in the southwest corner along the Detroit River. It can be studied as a microcosm of 'what went wrong' with Detroit, but understand the history of Delray before driving around there first.

I think Delray would be a good start and even around the Ford Rouge Complex as it used to be home to many different ethnic neighborhoods at one time. (Oakwood and Fort-italian immigrant neighborhood-still able to see remnants of the 'old neighborhood'..)

Delray would be along Jefferson (parallel to Detroit River..) between Dragoon,Schaeffer (Schaeffer is the very southern tip of "Delray") and Fort St.
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Unread 07-02-2007, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,356 posts, read 4,646,720 times
Reputation: 2413
Quote:
Originally Posted by brattpowered View Post
I'm especially fascinated by neighborhoods with old mansions that have been abandoned.
Thanks in advance.
Mack Ave west of I-75 by the old defunt yet famous factory that has the skywalk. (somebody help me remember the name of it..)

Highland Park has its share of abandoned and shabbily mansions.

It is odd to see an old and defunt mansion with some wino on the front porch sippin' away on some Mad Dog 20/20 or whatever...
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Unread 07-02-2007, 07:43 PM
 
195 posts, read 757,682 times
Reputation: 72
Just spend a little time. I think you will easily find that the devastation is beyond your imagination.
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Unread 07-04-2007, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Michigan
439 posts, read 1,129,859 times
Reputation: 351
There was an interesting article in a recent issue of _Harper's_ magazine about Detroit. The author argues that Detroit is developing a "post-American" landscape, and that that's not all bad. She notes that some areas have gone beyond blight and ruin and have completely returned to nature, and that some people have started growing their own food in some of these areas. She sees this glass as half-full: people have, of necessity, turned away from consumerism and developed a more sustainable way of life. The author suggests that Detroit may someday actually be a model for other cities, when the unsustainable way of life favored by most Americans inevitably begins to collapse and people are forced to look for alternatives.

Sorry I can't remember which issue it was, or the name of the author or the article, but it was recent. Did anyone else read this article, and if so, what did you think of it?
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