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Old 02-09-2011, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Detroit's eastside, downtown Detroit in near future!
2,055 posts, read 3,717,326 times
Reputation: 646

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Where do you get facts?

According to the census reports, Michigan was the only state losing population, but not "a lot of people" THe decrease was very small.

I do not know about the other cities that you list, but your facts about downriver seem completely fallacious.

"Many downriver" communities are declining? Which ones would those be? Since we have been here (2005) we have seen mostly growth and improvement in Trenton, Wyandotte, Woodhaven, Southgate, Riverview. Even Taylor seems to have improved somewhat. Some business have closed, but more new ones have opened. Chrysler expanded their Trenton plant. People talk about how yucky many downriver cities used ot be when all the factories were operating, but that was 10 or even 20 years ago. Where is the decline? What are the "many" cities that you refer to?
the population loss was not small
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Old 02-10-2011, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Grand Rapids Metro
8,765 posts, read 16,892,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by detroitlove View Post
the population loss was not small
Michigan lost about 53,000 people out of 9.9 Million (about half a percent).
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Old 02-14-2011, 02:17 PM
 
70 posts, read 86,605 times
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I've never been to Detroit but could any part of the downtown be converted into new senior retirement communities?

I've read about how people are looking into retirement in Cleveland, Ohio. Why? Because it offers them the opportunity to have the services listed below. Since these seniors are choosing to retire to a "cold weather destination" and snowy winters, could Detroit provide those services too?

1. Affordable housing for senior living? What buildings could be converted?

2. Public transportation for seniors who can no longer drive or choose not to own a car? Can they get to shopping, activities and hospitals?

3. Hospitals known for quality care?

4. A walkable downtown to enjoy shopping, dining, theater, community events, libraries, museums, historic home tours, etc.

5. University classes that offer quality education and community classes?

6. Airport (less than 2 hour drive) for world wide travel?

I'm not sure how to address the safety issue. What areas would be safer than others to live in downtown Detroit? Another concern I often read about is will newcomers feel welcome here and make new friends?
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Old 02-14-2011, 02:34 PM
 
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Everything is Cyclical. Detroit most certainly will be back. I know lots of people looking to move to Detroit such as myself.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:48 AM
 
Location: west mich
5,740 posts, read 5,688,913 times
Reputation: 2108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artistic Spirit View Post
I've never been to Detroit but could any part of the downtown be converted into new senior retirement communities?
1. Affordable housing for senior living? What buildings could be converted?
2. Public transportation for seniors who can no longer drive or choose not to own a car? Can they get to shopping, activities and hospitals?
3. Hospitals known for quality care?
4. A walkable downtown to enjoy shopping, dining, theater, community events, libraries, museums, historic home tours, etc.
5. University classes that offer quality education and community classes?
6. Airport (less than 2 hour drive) for world wide travel?
I'm not sure how to address the safety issue. What areas would be safer than others to live in downtown Detroit? Another concern I often read about is will newcomers feel welcome here and make new friends?
*From what I've been reading most of these points apply to the desires of non-seniors as well.
*Affordability may be a concern, so it depends upon what one considers affordable (Sec 8/202?)
*Re. safety: I thought downtown was already kept relatively safe due to its reliance on the conventions trade.
*Quality medical care? The DMC is not far from downtown.
DETROIT HOSPITAL - DMC - Detroit Medical Center
Detroit Medical Center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 02-18-2011, 07:51 PM
 
1 posts, read 911 times
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One small way that I think Detroit can turn arround is by restoring pride among residents. I think this can be facilitated by having an annual Detroit History Week to give residents a small glimpse of what their city used to be like and how amazing it was and still is. Creating a connection between the new generation of residents and the history of their city is essential, in my opinion, to turning around Detroit. I recently sent a message to Mayor Bing regarding this topic. If you have time could you please read this Detroit History Week Proposal and tell me what you think. Thank you.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Downtown Detroit
1,497 posts, read 3,031,221 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artistic Spirit View Post
I've never been to Detroit but could any part of the downtown be converted into new senior retirement communities?
I don't think your idea is a bad one, but ideally you want a mix of people living downtown Detroit.

Currently, there are plans to build a retirement center on the riverfront just outside of downtown and also a plan to renovate the old Southwest Detroit Hospital into a senior center, which is near Corktown.

Right now, downtown is a pretty good mix in terms of age. For instance, my building has retirees, students, a lot families with kids, and professionals of all ages. It really makes for a nice "neighborhood" especially when you get to know people on a first name basis.

What downtown really needs is more residents of all ages. To get that, downtown needs more residential buildings. People don't believe me when I tell them that I can't move to the building I want because it has had a waiting list for the past 3 years. Space downtown really is limited. There is availability at the very high end, like the $2500+/month places, and at the very low end, but the middle price range can be scarce, especially if you're looking to get into one of the trendier buildings.

As to your factors for seniors, I'd say downtown Detroit scores 4.5 out of 6:
  • Housing is fairly affordable, but like I said, we need more of it
  • Public transit is bad, but I hope this is temporary
  • DMC and Henry Ford are a good hospitals right in Midtown
  • Downtown is fairly walkable, lots of restaurants and 2 pharmacies, lots of nice public space, but we need more shopping
  • Wayne State U. is a major research institution with lots of classes and is accessible
  • Metro Airport is ~15-20 minutes outside of downtown
Regional leaders really need to team up with developers and create a vision for what they want downtown Detroit to look like. We need more residential space and infill developments to make blocks more walkable. We need light rail to get people from downtown to midtown quickly and comfortably and at least a bus service that makes direct runs to Metro Airport.

In terms of safety, downtown Detroit is safe and has good police coverage, but we need to open larger and more comprehensive homeless shelters away from the city center. The homeless problem isn't terrible, not nearly as bad as San Fran, but it can get annoying being routinely asked for change. Fortunately, most of the homeless stick to a handful of corners downtown, usually near the liquor stores.
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Old 02-19-2011, 07:49 AM
 
Location: west mich
5,740 posts, read 5,688,913 times
Reputation: 2108
Quote:
Originally Posted by detroitpride313 View Post
One small way that I think Detroit can turn arround is by restoring pride among residents. I think this can be facilitated by having an annual Detroit History Week to give residents a small glimpse of what their city used to be like and how amazing it was and still is.
Attitude adjustment among all residents regardless of social class/income level. Detroit as a "community" pulling together. A sense of community in solving problems is powerful, but take it BEYOND the block club!
West Berliners had it after ww2 had reduced their city to rubble (they rebuilt the city in something less than 20 years). I saw it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForStarters View Post
Regional leaders really need to team up with developers and create a vision for what they want downtown Detroit to look like. We need more residential space and infill developments to make blocks more walkable. We need light rail to get people from downtown to midtown quickly and comfortably and at least a bus service that makes direct runs to Metro Airport.
I alluded to this in another thread...a planner with a vision for Detroit to make it "world class" and subsequently ridiculed. I would like to see what the plan entailed but can't find any info on it. I remember that "world class" was one keyword for the project. It DID have its day in the local news.
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