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Old 11-16-2011, 10:12 AM
Status: "Campaigning 4 State House" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,337 posts, read 9,260,631 times
Reputation: 4969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maslanka View Post
Thats probably the biggest factor here, the amount of back taxes has to be outrageous on these houses. And I'm sure they don't let you know about it until after you buy the ol' shack.

I have heard stories of cities that sent past tax bills up to 3 years AFTER purchasing property. Though I haven't herad it happening in Detroit, it was Ann Arbor and other cities.

VERY important to do that title check and make sure it is FREE AND CLEAR of any and all emcumbrences.
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Old 11-16-2011, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,820 posts, read 28,610,104 times
Reputation: 11638
Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
I have heard stories of cities that sent past tax bills up to 3 years AFTER purchasing property. Though I haven't herad it happening in Detroit, it was Ann Arbor and other cities.

VERY important to do that title check and make sure it is FREE AND CLEAR of any and all emcumbrences.
Thatis called Title Insurance. Not expensive. Crazy to by real property without it.
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Old 11-16-2011, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,794 posts, read 2,201,154 times
Reputation: 2005
I read something in another forum that sort of made sense about the Detroit market in the more expensive neighborhoods:

Quote:
A $6,800 tax bill is about right for a house in Detroit with a market value of $200k that also qualifies for a homestead exemption, meaning that the owner certifies to the state that the home is being used as the owner's primary residence/domicile. And yes, if a property doesn't qualify for the homestead exemption, the taxes would be about 30% higher. This applies statewide, not just in Detroit. If the property is not currently receiving the homestead exemption, that means that the city is valuing the property at approximately $165k.

Under state law, the tax assessment of a property adjusts in the year following a sale of the property. The adjustment takes into account the sale price of the property and sale prices of similar properties in the neighborhood. Most University District sale prices (even non-foreclosure sales) have fallen below $200k since the Crash. If you buy the Parkside property for less than $200k and occupy it as a primary residence, the taxes should go down. If you buy it as an investment, you will have to pay less than $165k in order for the taxes to go down. However, if the property is a foreclosure sale and has some sort of bargain basement price, the taxes won't get reduced all the way to exactly reflect the low, low sale price. Assessors do not treat foreclosure sale prices as accurate indications of true market value. The floor for taxes in the University District is probably $4000-$4500.
Then another poster mentioned that you can get discounts or tax credits when you renovate homes with more efficient stuff for heating and such.

Taxes are also capped in certain areas so no one neighborhood in Detroit pays outrageously more than another. They'll still be higher, just not like $10,000 a year high, which is the type of money you'd pay for some homes in Grosse Pointe even if they aren't on the waterfront. So it's always nice to keep that in mind.
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Old 11-17-2011, 08:18 PM
 
Location: north of Windsor, ON
1,886 posts, read 2,512,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
I read something in another forum that sort of made sense about the Detroit market in the more expensive neighborhoods:



Then another poster mentioned that you can get discounts or tax credits when you renovate homes with more efficient stuff for heating and such.

Taxes are also capped in certain areas so no one neighborhood in Detroit pays outrageously more than another. They'll still be higher, just not like $10,000 a year high, which is the type of money you'd pay for some homes in Grosse Pointe even if they aren't on the waterfront. So it's always nice to keep that in mind.
The thing to look for in the city when it comes to keeping property taxes low is called a "Neighborhood Enterprise Zone." I'm not sure where all of them are, but they tend to be in better areas. E. English Village is one, I'm pretty sure, as is most if not all of the 48236 Zip Code.

As for that $10K tax bill in GP, at least you get something for your money. That $6800 tax bill you quoted in the post from which I just quoted is more or less money burned in the fireplace.
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Old 11-18-2011, 03:07 AM
Status: "The official bad boy of City Data Forum" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Los Angeles County, CA
28,639 posts, read 8,415,123 times
Reputation: 6035
I would think that the city of Detroit(or Wayne County) would welcome buyers and investor's who wish to purchase real estate in the urban core and revitalize the city. The rel estate tax must be lowered substantially. I am not in the market to buy in Detroit - but I was searching for ultra cheap houses and found Detroit on a lark(or perhaps not!) I think the way to help Detroit is to repopulate the city and this can be done by removing prohibitive real estate taxes, encouraging new business startups in the area, and by the federal and state governments removing exhorbitant tax rates and regulatory red tape for businesss that create jobs. Especialy(in the case of the Motor City) for automakers. It is cheaper to manufacture overseas the it is in in Detroit - due to government regulation and prohibitive taxation.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Your computer screen.
5,558 posts, read 3,964,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrier View Post
I would think that the city of Detroit(or Wayne County) would welcome buyers and investor's who wish to purchase real estate in the urban core and revitalize the city. The rel estate tax must be lowered substantially. I am not in the market to buy in Detroit - but I was searching for ultra cheap houses and found Detroit on a lark(or perhaps not!) I think the way to help Detroit is to repopulate the city and this can be done by removing prohibitive real estate taxes, encouraging new business startups in the area, and by the federal and state governments removing exhorbitant tax rates and regulatory red tape for businesss that create jobs. Especialy(in the case of the Motor City) for automakers. It is cheaper to manufacture overseas the it is in in Detroit - due to government regulation and prohibitive taxation.

That would be the intelligent thing to do, but here's what you are missing about the mentality of Detroiters:
  • Bringing in outsiders would mean bringing in white people, and according to the Detroit mentality, white people are oppressors who must be kept out of the city
  • Businesses are evil, greedy capitalists. They should be punished and not allowed to come into the city and force people into slave labor
  • Lowering taxes is an evil Republican concept. High taxes are good because it takes money from the greedy rich people and gives it to the poor
No, Harrier, the way that Detroit will succeed, in her own opinion, is through Socialism. Everyone should work for the city government in make-believe jobs paying high wages with benefits and pensions. And if this can not be paid for by Detroiters, then Lansing and/or Washington should flip the bill using tax dollars collected from the former oppressors.

Detroit has been racing (no pun intended) down the path of socialistic welfare state for 50 years now. It has destroyed the city (along with other factors), but the people of Detroit have been so brainwashed into believing it that they can't conceive of the fact that, despite all its failures, it may not be the correct coarse of action.
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Old 11-18-2011, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan and Sometimes Orange County CA
15,820 posts, read 28,610,104 times
Reputation: 11638
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
They'll still be higher, just not like $10,000 a year high, which is the type of money you'd pay for some homes in Grosse Pointe even if they aren't on the waterfront. So it's always nice to keep that in mind.
I think you are a bit high. We pay about $6000 in Grosse Ile for a 3900 s.f. home on an acre on the water. Grosse Point cannot be that much more expensive. Home values are way way down and so are taxes.
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:12 PM
 
530 posts, read 860,486 times
Reputation: 210
Taxes aren't the problem. How much are taxes in L.A. or New York or Tokyo or Toronto? Those places are brimming with people.

To be concise, don't overlook the fact Detroit is run by a bunch of scammers mainly voted in by illiterates as reflected by the HS Graduation rates... Does this mean posters here at CD who live in Detroit are illiterates? No!

Do to light-weight construction methods the suburbs will be blown out much faster than those brick/wet plaster homes Detroit used to have.



Detroit, Michigan

Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with mortgages in 2009: $1,677 (2.2%)
Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with no mortgage in 2009: $1,173 (2.2%)

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/city/Detroi...#ixzz1e6e5YLyg




Seattle, Washington

Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with mortgages in 2009: $3,605 (0.8%)
Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with no mortgage in 2009: $3,729 (0.8%)

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/city/Seattl...#ixzz1e6eBX5je




Detroit 27 years ago. Notice Brush Park then/now and the stadium areas:


Caution "R" rated -


Beverly Hills Cop - Cigarette Truck Chase


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3-gQIXhg4A

Last edited by fmax; 11-18-2011 at 06:00 PM.. Reason: Added tax info
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:40 PM
Status: "Campaigning 4 State House" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,337 posts, read 9,260,631 times
Reputation: 4969
Quote:
Originally Posted by fmax View Post
Taxes aren't the problem. How much are taxes in L.A. or New York or Tokyo or Toronto? Those places are brimming with people.

To be concise, don't overlook the fact Detroit is run by a bunch of scammers mainly voted in by illiterates as reflected by the HS Graduation rates... Does this mean posters here at CD who live in Detroit are illiterates? No!

Do to light-weight construction methods the suburbs will be blown out much faster than those brick/wet plaster homes Detroit used to have.



Detroit, Michigan

Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with mortgages in 2009: $1,677 (2.2%)
Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with no mortgage in 2009: $1,173 (2.2%)

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/city/Detroi...#ixzz1e6e5YLyg




Seattle, Washington

Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with mortgages in 2009: $3,605 (0.8%)
Median real estate property taxes paid for housing units with no mortgage in 2009: $3,729 (0.8%)

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/city/Seattl...#ixzz1e6eBX5je

Not sure what taxes are in Seattle (link is DOA) or Tokyo..

BUt Detroit is $45 (may be $49?)per $1000 assessed value. So a house with an SEV of $165K has close to $7000 in taxes. Not sure where the above values are from (links are DOA), but to pay $1677 in taxes the house has an SEV of $38K or less...what are the values of the Seattle homes with $3,605 taxes?

It is not neccessarily the TAXES, but the rate at which they are levied.
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Old 11-18-2011, 06:14 PM
 
530 posts, read 860,486 times
Reputation: 210
(links are DOA),


I'm sorry.... The links are all from here, http://www.city-data.com/

Go to CD home > under cities click "Michigan" > "Detroit, MI" > look for "Property Taxes".

Click back and then do the same for Seattle WA.
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