U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan > Detroit
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-18-2015, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,787 posts, read 2,068,887 times
Reputation: 3570

Advertisements

Hello. I'm from Salt Lake City and I've been passively looking for work out of state. Ideally I want to move to New Hampshire or Maine. I love the green, the open space and the secularism - all kind of the exact opposite of what you find in Utah- desert bordered by cramped suburbia in a theocracy.

Yesterday I interviewed with the State of Michigan EPA. I think (hope) it went well. By the end of the interview I was really quite interested in the position, but I know nothing of the area. I think the closest I've ever been to Detroit is Philly (and that's not close at all), so that's why I am here. What's Detroit like? I know what I hear on the news about Detroit, and I saw that dumb Eminem movie, but the media sensationalizes everything. So, some questions!

  • I'm 29, my wife is also 29 and we have a 2 month old baby, a Labrador and a dumb cat. I have a degree in geology and she has one in recreation management. If I were accepted a job and moved there, would I fit in? Would you move to your town with a young family?
  • We like the outdoors. In SLC it's not far to get there, but it's always crowded. Are there trails and state parks near Detroit? Are they overcrowded?
  • When we eventually buy a home, what are the suburbs like? The job is in Warren. Are there any reasonably commutable suburbs (<45 minutes in traffic) that are.. safe? Affordable for a young person? Decent public schools?. When I say "suburbs" I don't mean the LA cookie-cutter suburbs - I hate that, but rather places that are not planned developments and have lots of space between lots? and trees. Trees are good. Maybe a nearby lake? I heard a rumor once that some of your lakes were bigger than that Great Salt Lake. Not sure if I buy it yet.
  • The crime worries me, I just googled murders in Detroit and the internet said that in 2013 Detroit had a rate of 45 per 100k. That's ... well, to put that in perspective, the "rough" town out here is South Salt Lake, and in 2013 they had 8 murders per 100,000 people. I realize I could (and would) live outside of the city, but what if I wanted to go to a Lions or Pistons game or some museum in the city? Would I have to like dress in neutral colors and avoid parts of town and stuff like that? Is that a thing there?
  • Roadtrips. A huge thing about wanting to move east is that I would love to be able to take weekend roadtrips. From SLC it is 5 hours to Boise, 6 hours to Vegas and 11 hours to LA. Yes, there are national parks and mountains everywhere, but you can imagine that after 29 years of visiting the same ones over and over, they get less exciting. Where do people go for weekend trips from Detroit? Please tell me somewhere more exciting that Boise?
  • Anything else? What's your favorite thing about the Detroit metro area? If you were enticing someone who knew nothing of it to move there, what would you tell them?
  • Oh and I am a USU fan, so I too dislike Urban Meyer (he coached at the U of U). Does that make us friends?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-18-2015, 10:59 AM
 
2,205 posts, read 2,951,944 times
Reputation: 2215
What's your budget? That will narrow down (or expand) your choices. Lots of nice suburbs here like you described, but they vary in price.

State parks: there are plenty in Detroit Metro. They are obviously more crowded on the weekends, but I wouldn't consider them "overcrowded."

Crime in much of the burbs is virtually a non-factor. If you're going downtown for a sporting or cultural event you don't really have to worry (within reason). Downtown is like any other major city. Once you venture outside of Downtown and Midtown (a relatively small portion of the city where the cultural stuff is) is where you could end up in trouble.

Road trips to Northern/Western Michigan are probably the most popular. Great if you like the outdoors, beaches and water in the summer. There's some skiing in the winter, but NOTHING compared to Utah. Chicago is a 5-hour drive away. Lake Michigan has the most beautiful coastline in the state and is 2.5 hours from Metro Detroit.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,787 posts, read 2,068,887 times
Reputation: 3570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Digby Sellers View Post
What's your budget? That will narrow down (or expand) your choices. Lots of nice suburbs here like you described, but they vary in price.

State parks: there are plenty in Detroit Metro. They are obviously more crowded on the weekends, but I wouldn't consider them "overcrowded."

Crime in much of the burbs is virtually a non-factor. If you're going downtown for a sporting or cultural event you don't really have to worry (within reason). Downtown is like any other major city. Once you venture outside of Downtown and Midtown (a relatively small portion of the city where the cultural stuff is) is where you could end up in trouble.

Road trips to Northern/Western Michigan are probably the most popular. Great if you like the outdoors, beaches and water in the summer. There's some skiing in the winter, but NOTHING compared to Utah. Chicago is a 5-hour drive away. Lake Michigan has the most beautiful coastline in the state and is 2.5 hours from Metro Detroit.
Thanks. Good input. I didn't realize Chicago was so far. I actually don't ski or snowboard much (I can do it, but I am not a skier). It would be so awesome to live near a large body of water.

As for budget - I'm not sure. After selling my house here I'll have about a 40-50k down payment, so 200-250k would be ideal, but depending on what property taxes/insurance is like there we could feasibly afford up to 300k. I'd want at least 1,500 square feet (but definitely wouldn't complain about more) and preferably something with a garage - I hear it snows a lot there.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 12:27 PM
 
2,205 posts, read 2,951,944 times
Reputation: 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
Thanks. Good input. I didn't realize Chicago was so far. I actually don't ski or snowboard much (I can do it, but I am not a skier). It would be so awesome to live near a large body of water.

As for budget - I'm not sure. After selling my house here I'll have about a 40-50k down payment, so 200-250k would be ideal, but depending on what property taxes/insurance is like there we could feasibly afford up to 300k. I'd want at least 1,500 square feet (but definitely wouldn't complain about more) and preferably something with a garage - I hear it snows a lot there.
45 minute commute to Warren would put you in the northern burbs, which I know very little about. I do know that Rochester Hills is the most popular suburb out that way with the best schools. Not sure how far ~250K would go there. Others can help fill you in.

Living on that side of town would put you no more than 30 minutes away from Lake St. Clair and lots and lots of inland lakes. I do a lot of boating on St. Clair and absolutely love that area.

If you and your wife have passports, Toronto is only a 3-hour drive.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 12:47 PM
chh
 
Location: West Michigan
420 posts, read 544,819 times
Reputation: 369
Go look around google maps, the great lakes are huge compared to the great salt lake

Anyway, most suburbs are very safe. Crime doesn't really leak out from Detroit very much. Metro Detroit is very normal, just the city it's centered around isn't doing too great. Lots of suburbs are very family oriented, we don't know your price range, but for schools I'd look at North Sterling Heights/Utica, Troy, Rochester, or Harrison Township.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 01:15 PM
 
915 posts, read 1,226,812 times
Reputation: 1318
  • I'm 29, my wife is also 29 and we have a 2 month old baby, a Labrador and a dumb cat. I have a degree in geology and she has one in recreation management. If I were accepted a job and moved there, would I fit in? Would you move to your town with a young family?

    Yes, a lot of the families in my area are young families.
  • We like the outdoors. In SLC it's not far to get there, but it's always crowded. Are there trails and state parks near Detroit? Are they overcrowded?

    Yes, there are amazing trails and parks in the area. Some of the metroparks get crowded in the summer because of the beaches/splash pads.
  • When we eventually buy a home, what are the suburbs like? The job is in Warren. Are there any reasonably commutable suburbs (<45 minutes in traffic) that are.. safe? Affordable for a young person? Decent public schools?. When I say "suburbs" I don't mean the LA cookie-cutter suburbs - I hate that, but rather places that are not planned developments and have lots of space between lots? and trees. Trees are good. Maybe a nearby lake? I heard a rumor once that some of your lakes were bigger than that Great Salt Lake. Not sure if I buy it yet.

    As others have said, the northern suburbs would work well.
  • The crime worries me, I just googled murders in Detroit and the internet said that in 2013 Detroit had a rate of 45 per 100k. That's ... well, to put that in perspective, the "rough" town out here is South Salt Lake, and in 2013 they had 8 murders per 100,000 people. I realize I could (and would) live outside of the city, but what if I wanted to go to a Lions or Pistons game or some museum in the city? Would I have to like dress in neutral colors and avoid parts of town and stuff like that? Is that a thing there?

    You'll notice pretty quickly what parts of Detroit are okay and which aren't. Just like any other big city - know your surroundings, find a safe place to park your car, don't worry about what colors you are or aren't wearing. Detroit is booming in a big way these days and a lot of people want to see Detroit comeback - despite what you hear about the crime rate.

  • Roadtrips. A huge thing about wanting to move east is that I would love to be able to take weekend roadtrips. From SLC it is 5 hours to Boise, 6 hours to Vegas and 11 hours to LA. Yes, there are national parks and mountains everywhere, but you can imagine that after 29 years of visiting the same ones over and over, they get less exciting. Where do people go for weekend trips from Detroit? Please tell me somewhere more exciting that Boise?

    The short answer is "what are you in to?" Chicago, Ohio, Indy. Toronto/Windsor/Niagara Falls. Up North is always popular - Traverse City/Mackinaw Island, etc. Beaches - Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Erie - local swimming holes. There's just a ton of stuff to do in Michigan and the surrounding area. You really don't have to go far to find something. If you like Roller Coasters - Sandusky is just 2 hours away.

  • Oh and I am a USU fan, so I too dislike Urban Meyer (he coached at the U of U). Does that make us friends?

    As long as you aren't an Ohio State Fan.....you'll be cool with most people. That's the real deal breaker around here. Welcome to Michigan.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
3,832 posts, read 5,736,460 times
Reputation: 5334
Since it sounds like you'd like less crowded suburbs, you are probably going to want to stay in Northern Macomb County. From there you will be commute vs. space. 20 minutes will get you a less crowded town. If you want to push farther, you can be semi-rural.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 06:31 PM
 
1,595 posts, read 1,697,121 times
Reputation: 1690
Macomb township is a great place with really nice homes and priced well. You could even do a commute to the western suburbs. Metro Detroit is a robust and nice area. There is no place like Michigan in the summer. January through March will be cold. Metro Detroit has a lot of restaurants, pedestrian downtowns, shopping venues which range from bargain to upper end, and cultural amenities. Great place to raise a family and save money. Metro Beach is a popular destination plus there are so many trails and parks. Look at schooling districts as a factor. You should visit. If you do, make sure you visit the following places to get a feel of nightlife and cultural amenities:
1)Birmingham
2)Royal Oak
3)Ferndale
4)Rochester
5)Downtown and Midtown

Visit the Somerset Collection in Troy to see the shopping possibilities.

Then visit neighborhoods in Troy, Macomb, Sterling Heights, Utica, Rochester Hills, and Shelby township to see if there are any homes that get your attention.

Lastly, the West Coast of Michigan, Grand Traverse Bay, and Mackinac Island are definitely beautiful places. Toronto is 3.45 hours away.

Don't worry about Crime! You will not be living in Detroit proper. Also keep in mind that only 16% of the population in Metro Detroit actually lives in Detroit proper. You will be fine and crime in Oakland and Macomb counties are low. Welcome to the Land of Two Peninsulas! Here is a short video of Michigan...not too many places like it. I don't know of another place as beautiful as Michigan north of the Mason-Dixon Line except Oregon and Washington. (Metro Detroit area, while nice and full of lakes, is the least attractive area in Michigan)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gagnnGKprBE
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,640 posts, read 7,506,505 times
Reputation: 3747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
[list][*]I'm 29, my wife is also 29 and we have a 2 month old baby, a Labrador and a dumb cat. I have a degree in geology and she has one in recreation management. If I were accepted a job and moved there, would I fit in? Would you move to your town with a young family?
Definitely. Metro Detroit, imo, feels more family-friendly than singles-friendly. There's actually many natives here whose families have been here for generations and many who have moved out of state usually eventually move back for the familiarity. I dunno, it's just a comforting place.

Quote:
We like the outdoors. In SLC it's not far to get there, but it's always crowded. Are there trails and state parks near Detroit?
Yes.

Huron-Clinton Metroparks. Southeast Michigan Parks
Interactive Michigan Map | Pure Michigan

Quote:
Are they overcrowded?
Not really, imo. Though my only comparison are to parks in Chicago which obviously would be crowded, but honestly the only time I see that many people at any park in Metro Detroit is when there's special events or family gatherings. Otherwise I don't think it's at all crowded.


Quote:
When we eventually buy a home, what are the suburbs like? The job is in Warren. Are there any reasonably commutable suburbs (<45 minutes in traffic) that are.. safe? Affordable for a young person? Decent public schools?. When I say "suburbs" I don't mean the LA cookie-cutter suburbs - I hate that, but rather places that are not planned developments and have lots of space between lots? and trees. Trees are good. Maybe a nearby lake? I heard a rumor once that some of your lakes were bigger than that Great Salt Lake. Not sure if I buy it yet.
Most of the Great Lakes are far larger than the Great Salt Lake, though any of them are more than a couple hour's drive away. The largest lake that directly adjacent to Metro Detroit is Lake St. Clair and it's only about 1/4th the size of GSL. Still a good lake though. Many others in the Metro Area are smaller lakes, many no more than a few hundred acres in surface area.

As far as suburbs... well I'd say they're more or less cookie cutter, but not to the point of suffocation for many of the older suburbs. If you want a neighborhood where every home is architecturally unique (plus lots of space and trees), that's going to cost you a lot more than 300K. You're going to be looking at million-dollar homes if that's the case.

Quote:
[The crime worries me, I just googled murders in Detroit and the internet said that in 2013 Detroit had a rate of 45 per 100k. That's ... well, to put that in perspective, the "rough" town out here is South Salt Lake, and in 2013 they had 8 murders per 100,000 people. I realize I could (and would) live outside of the city, but what if I wanted to go to a Lions or Pistons game or some museum in the city? Would I have to like dress in neutral colors and avoid parts of town and stuff like that? Is that a thing there?
Lol, Pistons don't play in the city. Their stadium is miles out in the suburbs off the freeway next to some empty fields. As far as the other stuff, it's not really an issue for most people. Yes, there are some areas to avoid, but visually you'll be able to quickly tell where those areas are and you'll find very little reason for being in those areas multiple times. For the pretty much 98% of Detroit's suburbs, crime is a non-issue and for many areas, it's quite rare.


Quote:
Roadtrips. A huge thing about wanting to move east is that I would love to be able to take weekend roadtrips. From SLC it is 5 hours to Boise, 6 hours to Vegas and 11 hours to LA. Yes, there are national parks and mountains everywhere, but you can imagine that after 29 years of visiting the same ones over and over, they get less exciting. Where do people go for weekend trips from Detroit? Please tell me somewhere more exciting that Boise?
Up north. Which basically means anywhere else in Michigan outside of Metro Detroit. I mean, it's quicker to get to Ohio than it is to any of part of Michigan. But that's okay because much of Michigan is actually quite beautiful. Unlike many other states, Michigan doesn't get so much tourism traffic (though there are some tourist-y towns) and it's quite easy to find areas to just get away for a while. As far as excitement there's a plethora of amusement parks and major cities within weekend-vacation distance.

Quote:
Anything else? What's your favorite thing about the Detroit metro area? If you were enticing someone who knew nothing of it to move there, what would you tell them?
There are some of the nicest people you will ever meet here. Just don't try to get to know them while driving on the freeway because they are also some of the most aggressive drivers you will ever meet.

Quote:
Oh and I am a USU fan, so I too dislike Urban Meyer (he coached at the U of U). Does that make us friends?
I am a rare minority who actually doesn't follow college sports. All I know is that you're either Green or Blue. Oh by the way, Detroit is a huge sportstown. Huge.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2015, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
28,851 posts, read 68,665,277 times
Reputation: 35166
• If I were accepted a job and moved there, would I fit in? Would you move to your town with a young family?

Whether you will fit in depends on you. Are you adaptable? Uptight? Nosey? Easy going? People in Michigan are generally friendly, but most places are not very transient. That means most people have been here a long time, sometimes generations. It takes work to break into the social circles. They have had the same friends for their whole lives and most people are not really looking for new friends, but not unfriendly either (although it may seem that way at first). It is not like the west, where you meet someone and get invited to their family dinner that night. Friendships are deeper, but harder to come by. However one prevailing value is people love to do things for other people. They will not only help you, they will thank you for the opportunity to help you. It makes us feel good to help someone, so thank you for allowing me to feel good by helping you. Not all people, but a huge plurality are this way. People here tend to value privacy. However with mostly small communities, gossip is pretty common. Everyone will know your business, even if they pretend not to. Work ethic is important here. Want to impress someone? Come to an event like Christmas in April, or a community playground project or something similar and work your tail off. You impress people by your character and by how hard you work, not by the brand of car you drive or clothes/watch you wear. Most of the uber rich people I know you would never know they are rich, although there are places where the exceptions to this rule tend to congregate (Birmingham, Rochester Hills, Novi – still nice places, but those are where people who want ostentatious displays of wealth or pretend wealth tend to gather, there are some others as well).

Personally I think my town is probably the best place for a young family anywhere in the country. That is why we chose to live here after spending two year investigating most Metro Detroit towns, but it was a close call. I also think there are many similar towns nearby that are ideal for raising a family. There are so many awesome towns you could look at depending on how far you want to drive. Provide more details what you like, and we can better suggest a shorter list. Your problem will most likely be choosing between excellent options more than finding a suitable place.

Many towns are definitely not cookie cutter, the newer and more popular places are, but older towns and small towns are not. Grosse Ile is very ecletic - a few McMansion subs, but mostly a mix of big and small homes of all styles from the past 200 years. Even some log cabins. Other places to look at: Plymouth (city not township), Northville, Rochester (city not Hills), Romeo, Milford, Ann Arbor, Saline, Ferndale, Grosse Pointes, Someone else can add the rest,I am really tired and not thinking. Explore city-data Detroit, you will find a lot of lists and discussions on this.

• We like the outdoors. In SLC it's not far to get there, but it's always crowded. Are there trails and state parks near Detroit? Are they overcrowded?

Yes. No. Michigan is all about outdoors. Sometimes they get a bit crowded with deer. But you are not waiting in line hiking like Yosemite if that is what you mean. Typically I encounter maybe three or four other groups on a five mile hike. Actually the same is true on an all day hike. However your experiences may differ. Some times of year are more popular than others. I avoid those times. Also a lot of “hiking” here is done in canoes or Kayaks. There is foot hiking, but boat trips are far more rewarding. In the winter, hiking is done on X-C skis. Anyone can learn quickly. The ski trails do get a bit more busy unless you go early in the morning, or late at night (if allowed). The most beautiful places are north. Usually a three to five hour drive, but you can drive further too. You can drive 10 hours from Detroit and still be in Michigan.

To give you an example we went canoeing for three days on the Ausable River this summer. We encountered about ten groups of people. There was one large group about 20 people, another group of maybe 10 and the rest were just 2-4 people in a boat. We greeted them as we passed them or they us and then never saw them again. It was not crowded by any means. At our campsite, there was one other group of (2) people. They were up a hill and through the woods. We could not see or hear them from our campsite.

• When we eventually buy a home, what are the suburbs like? The job is in Warren. Are there any reasonably commutable suburbs (<45 minutes in traffic) that are.. safe? Affordable for a young person? Decent public schools?. When I say "suburbs" I don't mean the LA cookie-cutter suburbs - I hate that, but rather places that arenot planned developments and have lots of space between lots? and trees. Trees are good. Maybe a nearby lake? I heard a rumor once that some of your lakes were bigger than that Great Salt Lake. Not sure if I buy it yet.

The suburbs are the best and most eclectic group of suburbs I have seen anywhere. Yes, there is a suburb for you. No matter what your desires are, we probably have a pace to fit. There are lots and lots of decent public schools. They in all in places that cost more for the most part. Also you need to define “decent” Some schools offer more AP classes but have 4500 students in the high school. Some schools are small, but offer just the basics and only a few AP classes. Michigan has some of the best and also the largest teaching school(s) in the USA. Districts from other states come here to recruit regularly. Michigan treats its teachers well, and that is pretty well known, so teachers flock here from other states. Young teachers usually have to go to another state and get some experience before they can get a job in Michigan. So we have good teachers and a lot of good schools. If you rate schools by test scores, it depends on who the parents are more than anything else. If you rate schools by things like diversity, or income – we do not do as well. Michigan is pretty segregated.

Yes, some lakes are big. Small oceans. Lake Erie for example goes from Michigan through Ohio, Pennsylvania and ends up in New York, not to mention a lot of Canada on the other side. Lake Michigan touches Michigan, Illinois (Chicago), Wisconsin, Minnesota. Even the little lake (St. Clair) is huge and likely bigger than the Salt lake. The entire state is laced with rivers, lakes, streams and ponds. Minnesota’s motto was once “10,000 lakes” Michigan’s could be “We lost count” Some of the inland lakes are very big too. Kent lake at Kensington Metropark is 1200 acres. Not huge, but big ish. It is not the biggest of teh inland lakes, they are all over the place and some are quite large. I read somewhere that you are always within 6 miles of a major river or lake (not sure what defines “major”). Where we live, the Detroit river is about 1/3 mile wide on one side of the islands and about 2 miles on the other side. Then it widens out into Lake Erie. It is narrower up near Detroit, but still pretty wide. There is a lot of water here, I think 1/3 of the fresh water in the world is in the great lakes system.

• The crime worries me, I just googled murders in Detroit and the internet said that in 2013 Detroit had a rate of 45 per 100k. That's ... well, to put that in perspective, the "rough" town out here is South Salt Lake, and in 2013 they had 8 murders per 100,000 people. I realize I could (and would) live outside of the city, but what if I wanted to go to a Lions or Pistons game or some museum in the city? Would I have to like dress in neutral colors and avoid parts of town and stuff like that? Is that a thing there?

Murders in Detroit happen to the people engaged in buying or selling guns, sex or drugs- or engaging in gang activity. Random crimes are pretty rare. In our town about 25 miles outside Detroit the violent crime rate is pretty much 0. We might have one or two things happen in some years (usually family disputes or someone cracks from stress), but it is rare. We are usually the safest place in Michigan, but lots of other suburbs are close behind us for low crime. Crime is huge in parts of Detroit and those parts sway the average for the whole city, despite there are parts that are very nice. You do need to use common sense.

I work in the city every day. I go for long walks when I take breaks, often late at night. I have worked downtown and parked my car all day on about 2000 days. Number of problems: 0. Crime does happen, someone was once robbed in a parking garage for our complex, but it is rare. Downtown and midtown are relatively safe and very fun. The rough part (Brush Park) is being rebuilt into a new sports arena center with housing and retail etc. When that is done, it will be difficult to get into a bad area from anywhere you would want to be. If we did not have kids and already an awesome place to live, I would move downtown in an instant. The bad areas are in the surrounding neighborhoods, some of which are nice, some horrible and some in between. Many of the old neighborhoods are pretty much vacant. You know when you are in a bad area. Stay in your car and get out of the area asap. Problem solved.

• Roadtrips. A huge thing about wanting to move east is that I would love to be able to take weekend roadtrips. From SLC it is 5 hours to Boise, 6 hours to Vegas and 11 hours to LA. Yes, there are national parks and mountains everywhere, but you can imagine that after 29 years of visiting the same ones over and over, they get less exciting. Where do people go for weekend trips from Detroit? Please tell me somewhere more exciting that Boise?

I’ve not been to Boise, but we lived in Orange County Ca where there are more cool things nearby than you can do in a lifetime. Detroit Metro is not on that level, but it certainly has plenty to do within range. To me, a 7 hour drive is reasonable, so I may be more road oriented than you are. There are a lot of weekend trips, if you are willing to spend a lot of the weekend driving, or take a 3 day weekend. Chicago is close (4-5 hours), Meramec Cavern Park in Missouri is in reach. Mammoth caves, Cedar Point in Ohio. Shipshewana Indiana is a cool Mennonite (quaker) tourist town. All of Northern Michigan is beautiful and fun in different ways. Mostly outdoor things. Western Michigan has some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. The sand dune parks are fun to explore. The trail between the lower and upper Tahquamenon falls is one of my favorite trials (long and rigorous, but beautiful). There are lots so cool specialty things to do too. Visit Hell, Colon Michigan is the magic capital of the world, Traverse City is just plain gorgeous. Ann Arbor is right next door to Detroit Metro and has abundant things to do (it is the most educated city in the US). Detroit has loads of theaters, sports venues, museums (one of the best Art Museums in America). Most suburbs have at least something worthwhile, and the Metropark system is really nice, especially if you are in close range to Kensington (but all of them are pretty nice).

• Anything else? What's your favorite thing about the Detroit metro area? If you were enticing someone who knew nothing of it to move there, what would you tell them?

Trees, forests, rivers lakes, everywhere. Wild animals on your lawn. One thing – you must learn to enjoy winter or you will not be happy here. Whether you do sledding, tobogganing, X-C skiing, ice fishing, whatever, you must have something to make you look forward to winter.

Fall here is the most awesome time. I cannot describe it, the atmosphere is charged and pleasant. Everyone I know agrees, fall is phenomenal, no one has been able to adequately describe why.

• Oh and I am a USU fan, so I too dislike Urban Meyer (he coached at the U of U). Does that make us friends?
Sorry, no idea what USU is or Urban Meyer. You need to choose U – M or MSU. The end. Oh and you WILL be a Wings, tigers and probably Lions fan. It is pretty much inevitable. Ohio Sstate fans might have some problems here, especially in Ann Arbor.

I live in Grosse Ile. It is an island about forty minutes south of Detroit. Nearly an hour to Warren, and that to too far to commute IMO. However we have an EPA office on the main island. If you could work there instead, I cannot imagine a better lifestyle. Grosse Ile is magical. You cross one of the bridges and your body just relaxes, you are home, you are safe. It is hard to describe, but everyone I know says they get the same feeling. We have great schools, exemplary public safety, lots of open space (woods), bike trials, hike trails, boat, tennis, and golf clubs, an alpaca farm. Surrounded by water. The biggest problem we face Is an overpopulation of deer and some roads in really bad condition. I have written in other threads describing all the amenities. If you become interested search Detroit or Michigan sections for “Grosse” and you should find them. Your budget of $250,000 is not going to put you on the water, but you can find a nice home for that amount. You might even get a place on the canal (allows you to have a small boat dock in your back yard and access the Detroit River/Lake Erie.

Last of all, it is not really secular here. Sure there is no church in control, but there are a lot of churches and more people are faithful than not or try to be at least in my experience.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan > Detroit

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:19 PM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top