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View Poll Results: Has Detroit fully made a comeback?
YES 7 28.00%
NO 18 72.00%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-12-2015, 12:15 PM
 
1,918 posts, read 2,433,538 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnynonos View Post
The part of the equation that is often ignored in these conversations is why people came to Detroit in the first place: great jobs.
People in the suburbs have jobs. There are jobs to be obtained by Detroit residents - the jobs are just not in the city itself like it used to be.
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:32 PM
 
615 posts, read 1,201,075 times
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I'm still surprised how the blight in neighborhoods away from the few gentrifying areas is still spreading. All of the homes where I and my older siblings lived after first leaving Mom and Dad (Kelly, Whittier, Kensington and Woodhall north of I-94) were intact five years ago and now in ruins. Several of the blocks east of Casino (right up against the HW limits) are badly blighted. The pattern persists in similar west side neighborhoods as well.
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Old 10-16-2015, 02:02 PM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 25,424,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
I am going to go out on the limb and project that the 2020 census will show AT LEAST 713,000 people, which is what was tallied in the last census. Whoever the Mayor is in 2020 just needs to put an all out effort in motivating people to be counted in the city.....like what has been done every decade, starting in 1980 but excluding 2010. Detroit is the type of city where many people live in the shadows...and if you do not motivate them to be counted and make them feel safe in being counted (they might be illegally squatting)....they will not be counted.

Assuming a city wide campaign to get people counted....2020 population 725,000....assuming no national economic collapse.
I hear many of the white suburbanites moving into Detroit have not changes residency in the way of voter registrations an driver licences / vehicle registrations?
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Old 10-16-2015, 03:29 PM
 
10,276 posts, read 8,227,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313 TUxedo View Post
I'm still surprised how the blight in neighborhoods away from the few gentrifying areas is still spreading. All of the homes where I and my older siblings lived after first leaving Mom and Dad (Kelly, Whittier, Kensington and Woodhall north of I-94) were intact five years ago and now in ruins. Several of the blocks east of Casino (right up against the HW limits) are badly blighted. The pattern persists in similar west side neighborhoods as well.
This is what I don't understand. Are the Detroit boosters blind? Are they only visiting downtown and midtown?

Detroit, as a whole, is much worse than 5 or 10 years ago. The abandonment and decay has never been worse than exactly right now. The city has never looked emptier, if you drive throughout the city.

I have relatives who have commercial real estate near 8 Mile/Schaefer. Even 3-4 years ago, there was no abandonment in the area. It was a declining working class black area, struggling but not terrible. Now it looks like a bomb hit, with abandoned homes everywhere.
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Old 10-16-2015, 03:32 PM
 
10,276 posts, read 8,227,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
I hear many of the white suburbanites moving into Detroit have not changes residency in the way of voter registrations an driver licences / vehicle registrations?
Voter registrations and drivers licenses have nothing to do with Census counts. If Census shows that Detroit is declining in population, then it's likely true.
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Old 10-16-2015, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,640 posts, read 7,476,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
This is what I don't understand. Are the Detroit boosters blind? Are they only visiting downtown and midtown?

Detroit, as a whole, is much worse than 5 or 10 years ago. The abandonment and decay has never been worse than exactly right now. The city has never looked emptier, if you drive throughout the city.

I have relatives who have commercial real estate near 8 Mile/Schaefer. Even 3-4 years ago, there was no abandonment in the area. It was a declining working class black area, struggling but not terrible. Now it looks like a bomb hit, with abandoned homes everywhere.
Where I grew up at on Dexter and Davison, the area has been in decline since the 90s. Even after 2012, the east side of Dexter is still losing residents. However, I have personally met new residents on the west side of Dexter. Even a number of homes that looked pretty dilapidated several years ago are being renovated by some of these new residents.

No one is denying that a number of Detroit's neighborhoods will still lose population purely because they are populated with senior citizens and working class citizens whom are primarily employed in low-wage low-skill jobs. Seniors die off and low-skill jobs are scarce in Detroit.

However, there's never been any point in Detroit's history since it's decline where professional middle class residents have been moving in. This is something entirely new to Detroit and there's definitely certain neighborhoods seeing the benefits of that. Someone making 50K a year isn't going to move to 8 Mile and Schaefer and it's pretty unrealistic to expect that to happen, unless it's a newly built house or something.
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Old 10-17-2015, 09:35 AM
 
10,276 posts, read 8,227,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
W
However, there's never been any point in Detroit's history since it's decline where professional middle class residents have been moving in.
But how do you know "professional middle class residents have been moving in"? What evidence do you have? The 2010 Census showed a steep decline in middle and upper class Detroiters relative to 2000.

The vast majority of "professional middle class residents" live in Palmer Woods, Indian Village, Rosedale Park, University District, East English Village, Boston Edison, etc. There are barely any such people living downtown or midtown. All those residential areas are declining, and worse off than 10 years ago, so there is no evidence of an increase in professionals in Detroit.
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Old 10-17-2015, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,599 posts, read 1,575,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
This is what I don't understand. Are the Detroit boosters blind? Are they only visiting downtown and midtown?

Detroit, as a whole, is much worse than 5 or 10 years ago. The abandonment and decay has never been worse than exactly right now. The city has never looked emptier, if you drive throughout the city.

I have relatives who have commercial real estate near 8 Mile/Schaefer. Even 3-4 years ago, there was no abandonment in the area. It was a declining working class black area, struggling but not terrible. Now it looks like a bomb hit, with abandoned homes everywhere.
Detroit is miles ahead of where it was just 5 years ago, most people in the know will tell you that, and that goes for many of the neighbourhoods as well. Sure, some neighbourhoods continue to decline, but many are getting better and property values are rising. Too bad you're not better informed!

Last edited by North 42; 10-17-2015 at 09:53 AM..
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Old 10-17-2015, 12:09 PM
 
1,918 posts, read 2,433,538 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
But how do you know "professional middle class residents have been moving in"? What evidence do you have? The 2010 Census showed a steep decline in middle and upper class Detroiters relative to 2000.

The vast majority of "professional middle class residents" live in Palmer Woods, Indian Village, Rosedale Park, University District, East English Village, Boston Edison, etc. There are barely any such people living downtown or midtown. All those residential areas are declining, and worse off than 10 years ago, so there is no evidence of an increase in professionals in Detroit.
I doubt that Indian Village and adjacent West Village is worse off than they were 10 years ago. Just in the past two years the following businesses have opened in West Village:

Parker Street Market (a small grocery store at Kercheval and Parker Street)

Sister Pie (right across the street from Parker Market)

The Red Hook - coffee shop

Craft Work - restaurant

Detroit Vegan Soul

Tea and Tarot - card reading

MORE IS ON THE WAY

Geiger Eat Shop - new restaurant to open soon, the 2-story building in which it will be located is being renovated for businesses and residences (exciting stuff)

Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
But how do you know "professional middle class residents have been moving in"? What evidence do you have? The 2010 Census showed a steep decline in middle and upper class Detroiters relative to 2000.

The vast majority of "professional middle class residents" live in Palmer Woods, Indian Village, Rosedale Park, University District, East English Village, Boston Edison, etc. There are barely any such people living downtown or midtown. All those residential areas are declining, and worse off than 10 years ago, so there is no evidence of an increase in professionals in Detroit.
If there are barely any professional middle class residents in downtown and midtown, then who has moved into the new residential projects that have been built and the renovated projects in the past 10 years:

Downtown:
Renovated Buildings
City Apartments
Residences at the Double Tree Fort Shelby
Residences at the Westin Book Cadillac

Midtown:
New Construction:
The Auburn
Studio One

Renovation projects (many smaller projects):

El Moore Apartments
Midtown eyesore transformed into green living apartments

Rainer Court
Mayor Duggan, Chase CEO Dimon Cut Ribbon at Rainer Court - Unarrested Development - Curbed Detroit

Davenport Apartments
Stunning Renovation Saves Abandoned Davenport Apartments - Preservation Win - Curbed Detroit

If there weren't professional moving down here, than why would Carhartt open a store, why would the Will Leather Goods franchise out of Oregon be building a store on Second Avenue as we speak. It was also announced Nike is building a store in Downtown.
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Old 10-17-2015, 12:31 PM
 
181 posts, read 155,792 times
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Default In a way, yes....

Will Detroit ever be what it was decades ago? Unlikely. Has there been progress made in Detroit? Sure! Mostly downtown. I've been noticing an increase in professionals and people in my age demographic 20-30 in areas downtown. There have been new businesses opening up, like someone said earlier, marketing to this demographic. There are people buying abandoned homes, turning them into urban farms, and running social activist groups. I do see people bringing positivity to the city. Is the population of Detroit decreasing overall still? Yes. But for a city that has been in a decline for basically 40 years you're not going to see rapid change. I do think that things can change in the future because nothing is set in stone. However, I don't think that Detroit will return to its former position as a major US capital in my lifetime. If you think it could compete with the usual powerhouses(like NYC, Chicago, SF), your head is way deep in the sand or you have not left Michigan.

That said, I feel like if people who were willing to invest money/time in the city moved there, and the people who complain about it or have grown to hate it left (like me), it would improve much faster. lmao
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