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View Poll Results: Has Detroit fully made a comeback?
YES 7 28.00%
NO 18 72.00%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-17-2015, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,640 posts, read 7,478,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
But how do you know "professional middle class residents have been moving in"? What evidence do you have? The 2010 Census showed a steep decline in middle and upper class Detroiters relative to 2000.

The vast majority of "professional middle class residents" live in Palmer Woods, Indian Village, Rosedale Park, University District, East English Village, Boston Edison, etc. There are barely any such people living downtown or midtown. All those residential areas are declining, and worse off than 10 years ago, so there is no evidence of an increase in professionals in Detroit.
I guess poor people are paying 1500 a month for rent and buying 100K houses????
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Old 10-17-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
. There are barely any such people living downtown or midtown.
Why don't you try calling around for apartments downtown? Most places are fully occupied and when you find an available place, it is usually $1800+. Anything around $1000-1200 a month has a waiting list. My stepbrother's best friend put a deposit down in August for a March move-in.
Midtown doesn't have much available, either.
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Old 10-17-2015, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Detroit
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If anyone wants proof that higher income individuals are moving in... just read some articles about how the price per sq foot in and downtown has increased dramatically (the highest in decades) including the number of businesses opening up. And there are still waiting list. "NOLA" Seriously? the census was 5 going on 6 years ago, and if you think the downtown and surrounding areas is the same as it was in 2010 let alone 2005 then there's nothing anybody can say to you. Even the overall Detroit property values have went up since then. You do realize your arguing with people who live here and are seeing these changes from day to day while your literally across the country in New Orleans right? These prices aren't increasing for no reason, someone is buying them at those prices and that's all the evidence you should need.
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Old 10-17-2015, 04:41 PM
 
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A strong downtown and midtown is key for future success for the entire city. Detroit has embarked on step one, and it has been a successful endeavor. Step two is for neighborhoods adjacent to downtown and Midtown to be redeveloped - Corktown, Eastern Market, Woodbridge, Rivertown, and Lafayette Park. I think we have transitioned to step 2. We should probably begin to see more development and life in these areas. After this comes step 3 - the Villages, Marina District, the area between Boston-Edison and New Center, and the areas around Woodbridge. Then will come step 4 which will be Mexican town, Michigan Avenue, and the rest of the area south of I-94 from Lafayette park to Grosse Pointe Park.

As I have mentioned many times, the New Detroit will be the entire strip south of I-94 from Dearborn to Grosse Pointe Park. North of I-94 will remain abandoned except for certain neighborhoods.
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Old 10-18-2015, 05:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Republic of Michigan View Post
A strong downtown and midtown is key for future success for the entire city. Detroit has embarked on step one, and it has been a successful endeavor. Step two is for neighborhoods adjacent to downtown and Midtown to be redeveloped - Corktown, Eastern Market, Woodbridge, Rivertown, and Lafayette Park. I think we have transitioned to step 2. We should probably begin to see more development and life in these areas. After this comes step 3 - the Villages, Marina District, the area between Boston-Edison and New Center, and the areas around Woodbridge. Then will come step 4 which will be Mexican town, Michigan Avenue, and the rest of the area south of I-94 from Lafayette park to Grosse Pointe Park.

As I have mentioned many times, the New Detroit will be the entire strip south of I-94 from Dearborn to Grosse Pointe Park. North of I-94 will remain abandoned except for certain neighborhoods.
I'm from Baltimore. I wonder how Detroit can claim a turn around because a area covering less than 1/4 if its area is doing better? The world is well aware of how bad the bad parts of Baltimore are but the other 3/4 of the city is doing fairly well. Interestingly, even places like Sandtown, which is admittedly a disaster, has population density of over 15,000 per square mile. So, sure, the best parts of Detroit are a lot better than the worst parts of Baltimore, but it is interesting how different cities are judged by different measures.

Baltimore is nowhere near claiming a turn around (despite small population gains) and is, in fact, is widely seen as being in worse trouble than Detroit. But if it were judged based on Detroit standards, it might be a different story.
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Old 10-18-2015, 08:55 PM
 
1,918 posts, read 2,436,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
I'm from Baltimore. I wonder how Detroit can claim a turn around because a area covering less than 1/4 if its area is doing better? The world is well aware of how bad the bad parts of Baltimore are but the other 3/4 of the city is doing fairly well. Interestingly, even places like Sandtown, which is admittedly a disaster, has population density of over 15,000 per square mile. So, sure, the best parts of Detroit are a lot better than the worst parts of Baltimore, but it is interesting how different cities are judged by different measures.

Baltimore is nowhere near claiming a turn around (despite small population gains) and is, in fact, is widely seen as being in worse trouble than Detroit. But if it were judged based on Detroit standards, it might be a different story.
When the VAST majority of people talk about Detroit's comeback, nobody is talking about the whole city, or the majority of the city. They are talking about the downtown area and several neighborhoods surrounding downtown. These areas comprise probably about 10% of the land area of Detroit.

The vast majority of the rest of the city is ranging from holding steady (like Mexicantown and North Rosedale Park) to steep decline (like Boynton and the Kelly Road/Hayes/Houston-Whittier neighborhood). My neighborhood of Warrendale is in moderate decline, but is seeing an influx of Middle Eastern people on the eastern and southern ends and a trickle of Latinos.
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Old 10-19-2015, 10:35 AM
 
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Detroit still has the highest poverty rate for families with children -- 39.3%

Gilbert extending his yuppie empire isn't going to help those folks one iota.
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Old 10-19-2015, 10:59 AM
 
10,276 posts, read 8,235,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS313 View Post
If anyone wants proof that higher income individuals are moving in... just read some articles about how the price per sq foot in and downtown has increased dramatically (the highest in decades) including the number of businesses opening up.
Or we could actually look at the offical Census numbers, which show that Detroit is the poorest city in the U.S., and that the number of middle class and upper class residents in Detroit has dropped by half over the last 15 years.

I don't know why you would think that rising prices per square foot downtown would have anything to do with answering the question. Putting aside the fact that downtown has almost no for sale real estate so you're apparently talking about commercial space (the only for-sale residential space right downtown is the Book Cadillac, and that's a few dozen units), downtown is like 5% of the city, and prices usually rise whatever geography you're talking about. Prices in Detroit actually skyrocketed in the late 1990's, throughout the city. Doesn't mean the city wasn't declining. It's the very odd situation where an area has prices declines over a sustained period of time (not even true in Detroit).
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Old 10-19-2015, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Or we could actually look at the offical Census numbers, which show that Detroit is the poorest city in the U.S., and that the number of middle class and upper class residents in Detroit has dropped by half over the last 15 years.
Yet you've seemed to miss the numbers by the same Census Bureau that shows Detroit's median income rising the last 3 years. Even if it's half what it was whatever many years ago, the fact is that it's rising (or at the very least, flat) today. The poverty rate has been falling as well. It's not possible to get a flat median income with a declining population unless there's people in the top half moving into/staying in the city somewhere or more people on the bottom half are moving out.


Census bureau: Detroit is poorest big city in U.S.
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Old 10-19-2015, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,955,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Yet you've seemed to miss the numbers by the same Census Bureau that shows Detroit's median income rising the last 3 years. Even if it's half what it was whatever many years ago, the fact is that it's rising (or at the very least, flat) today. The poverty rate has been falling as well. It's not possible to get a flat median income with a declining population unless there's people in the top half moving into/staying in the city somewhere or more people on the bottom half are moving out.


Census bureau: Detroit is poorest big city in U.S.
Thank you... that's all that needs to be said.

Quote:
NOLA101
And you wonder why there is hardly no residential space left downtown? BECAUSE HIGHER INCOME PEOPLE ARE MOVING IN TOO FAST!. Even the areas around downtown are trying to keep up with demand.
Downtown Detroit apartment rents spiking higher, even pricing out middle class | Detroit Free Press | freep.com
I've been priced out of downtown Detroit - May. 27, 2014
Rents keep going up in greater downtown Detroit

Nobody on this thread said that the entire city was booming. Nobody on this thread said that the entire city didn't still have major issues plaguing the city. All we're saying is changes are happening slowly but surely. Alot of Detroit's problems are actually being addressed and unlike before, people are actually trying to get these problems taken care of which is why the police response times are down, or why there are more efficient buses on the streets, or why blight is being renovated or taken down aggressively, or why there are more efficient street lights all around the city when just a couple of years ago many neighborhoods had few working street lights, ect. It all plays apart in the beginning of the road to a better Detroit. But problems the city has had for years don't just go away overnight.
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