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View Poll Results: Has Detroit fully made a comeback?
YES 7 28.00%
NO 18 72.00%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-19-2015, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,640 posts, read 7,459,385 times
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This news also came out this morning:

Quote:
In Detroit, for example, total year-to-date sales are off about 18 percent compared with the first three quarters of 2014, according to Realcomp. But median sale prices jumped year to date in 29 out of 31 ZIP codes that are partly or completely within the city. For May-to-September, fewer than 2,000 properties fetched more than $113 million combined, compared with about $90 million from nearly 2,200 properties over the same period of 2014.
New heat for Southeast Michigan's housing market: Sales, prices hit 10-year highs

Downtown and Midtown make up only 2 zip codes. None of the other 'good neighborhoods' of the city take up any whole zip codes so clearly there's enough substantial demand for housing to drive an increase in prices. Sure you can still cherry pick declining blocks of the city, but you can pretty much do that for most any city but it's pretty hard to refute that the city overall is progressing in the right direction.
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Old 10-20-2015, 06:29 AM
 
1,648 posts, read 2,826,206 times
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It would be interesting to see the average income for the top ten zip codes in Detroit 2000 vs. 2015.

Detroit, Michigan Zip Code Boundary Map (MI)

I think 48226 (downtown) is in the top ten in the state. I'd guess 48201 (Midtown), 48214 (Indian Village/Berry), 48203 (Palmer Woods) and 48221 (Sherwood/University) would round out the top 5. A few others 48227 (Grandmont/Rosedale) and 48207 (Lafayette Park) have large tracks of Section 8 housing which would provide downward pressure on stats but do contain nice pockets.
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Old 10-20-2015, 05:03 PM
 
615 posts, read 1,197,371 times
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48203 is very large, and has a lot of areas in Highland Park and Detroit (east of Woodward) that would really drag 48203's overall stats WAY down.

Perhaps one of the most bipolar Zip Codes in the country.
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Old 10-20-2015, 05:15 PM
 
2,956 posts, read 2,253,167 times
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Most of 48205 looks like an A bomb hit it.

Except for a six block area around downtown, literally 70% meadows, some areas almost back to primeval forest; 25% slums; and about 5% neighborhoods in good condition (unfortunately, often completely surrounded by meadows and slums). Just take a Google map street view tour. Start off anywhere, head anywhere. You'll see. Best and safest way to tour.

The suburbs, however, are booming. Everybody is working. Rush hour is as bumper to bumper as ever.
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Old 10-21-2015, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,940,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
Most of 48205 looks like an A bomb hit it.

Except for a six block area around downtown, literally 70% meadows, some areas almost back to primeval forest; 25% slums; and about 5% neighborhoods in good condition (unfortunately, often completely surrounded by meadows and slums). Just take a Google map street view tour. Start off anywhere, head anywhere. You'll see. Best and safest way to tour.

The suburbs, however, are booming. Everybody is working. Rush hour is as bumper to bumper as ever.
70% of the city is urban prairie basically? hmm... something isn't adding up.
If 26% of Detroit is vacant while the other 74% of Detroit is occupied, then how can 70% of Detroit be meadows?

BTW, if what you said was true, for Detroit to still have 700k people, the remaining 30% of the city would have to be about 17,000 people per square mile.
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Old 10-21-2015, 04:50 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
36,516 posts, read 40,297,140 times
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This all reminds me of the History Channel series "Life after People".

I believe much of it has been filmed in Detroit.
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Old 10-21-2015, 08:35 PM
 
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Detroit is neither 70% meadow nor 90% intact neighborhoods. It's residential areas are roughly about 20% ghost neighborhoods (large majority of vacant lots or houses in ruins that will not be recovered), another 15% are sharply declining (several vacant houses among very many occupied homes, where squatters and arson are a problem), and about 20% basically intact neighborhoods (90+% occupied, many of these up to code, with vacancies being refilled in reasonable time).

This leaves almost half of the neighborhoods in between - a few vacant lots and a few houses awaiting teardown, with most houses occupied, but with extended intervals between owners/tenants. This 45% is Detroit's challenge. There is great progress being made in demolition of houses beyond the brink and clearing of lots in this 45%, but clearing is not the whole answer. The cleanest vacant lot still looks like a warning sign to a prospective resident. It is true that a model with rotten teeth will not be shown in a fashion magazine, but you won't see a model with missing teeth, either.
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Old 10-22-2015, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,940,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313 TUxedo View Post
Detroit is neither 70% meadow nor 90% intact neighborhoods. It's residential areas are roughly about 20% ghost neighborhoods (large majority of vacant lots or houses in ruins that will not be recovered), another 15% are sharply declining (several vacant houses among very many occupied homes, where squatters and arson are a problem), and about 20% basically intact neighborhoods (90+% occupied, many of these up to code, with vacancies being refilled in reasonable time).

This leaves almost half of the neighborhoods in between - a few vacant lots and a few houses awaiting teardown, with most houses occupied, but with extended intervals between owners/tenants. This 45% is Detroit's challenge. There is great progress being made in demolition of houses beyond the brink and clearing of lots in this 45%, but clearing is not the whole answer. The cleanest vacant lot still looks like a warning sign to a prospective resident. It is true that a model with rotten teeth will not be shown in a fashion magazine, but you won't see a model with missing teeth, either.
This is alot more accurate, thank you. A big problems are vacant homes in occupied neighborhoods where kids walk to school. Every bombed out home is a danger zone, an eye sore, and brings down the property value. Going by parcels of land you can really see where much of the 26% of vacant Detroit is when looking at some of the resources like "Data Driven Detroit



In this map you can see the ghost town neighborhoods clear as day, Ironically the emptiest being near downtown which can be bad or good if your a planner.
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Old 10-22-2015, 09:30 PM
 
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I'd be willing to bet that since the date on that map (February, 2010), many neighborhoods have gone to that second shade of green, particularly on the Kelly, Gratiot, State Fair, Joy and 7 mile (far east and far west) corridors.
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Old 10-22-2015, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,671 posts, read 4,940,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313 TUxedo View Post
I'd be willing to bet that since the date on that map (February, 2010), many neighborhoods have gone to that second shade of green, particularly on the Kelly, Gratiot, State Fair, Joy and 7 mile (far east and far west) corridors.
Yeah I think so too. The Osborne neighborhood is just getting ugly. The crime is killing the northeast side. I don't think I've ever been in the 7 mile and Telegraph area though.
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