U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan > Detroit
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-30-2018, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
7,008 posts, read 11,121,092 times
Reputation: 5769

Advertisements

I have been very curious and fascinated with the city of Detroit, and its long recovery for quite some time. This summer or fall I would like to plan a trip to visit the city, mostly the downtown area, I'm still researching the things I would like to see and do in the city. I casually read over stories of restoration efforts in Detroit and the huge investments that have been made in the city, along with the bankruptcy filing and the exit plan from bankruptcy, it's all been very hopeful to watch, I'm rooting for the city, even though I've never visited.


Anyhow, my main question is this: Is Detroit, in 2018 at its best point in the last 40 years? Is it finally trending up instead of trending down? I don't mean just in population, plenty of cities can drastically improve while still losing people.



The second part of my question, less focused on this part though, when was Detroit at its worst?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-30-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,259 posts, read 74,492,155 times
Reputation: 38296
1. Yes. However a lot of awesome buildings were torn down int he last 40 years, so architecturally, it was better 40 years ago. More run down than now, but less was missing. It actually had even greater potential before the City government became obsessed with creating empty lots. However as far as overall condition - I woudl say it is overall better than any time int eh last 40 years. Some neighborhoods were in better shape than they are now, but as a City as a whole, Detroit is far more attractive than it has been in recent history.

2. . . . that is difficult. Just considering downtown, I would say about 2009 or 2010, although it was worse in the 1980s in some ways. In 2009 it was rundown and empty. Not scary because no one was there. In the 1980s it was often scary downtown, especially in the vicinity of Brush Park.

If you include the neighborhoods, I would say definitely 2009 - 2012, maybe a bit later.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 09:40 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,647,065 times
Reputation: 1846
Ehhh.....yes and no.
From a "best its been in the past 40 years" probably not.
From the perspective of the "best outlook/trajectory/positive momentum" that answer would arguably be yes.

For downtown and the immediately surrounding neighborhoods, they are on the best they've been in at least 2 decades from the growth of business, retail, restaurants, and residential.

The outer neighborhoods, many area are still a mess and will be for a long time. Some areas have stabilized but other areas are too far gone. The outer neighborhoods have been in a perpetual free-fall since the 1970s.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 09:46 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,647,065 times
Reputation: 1846
From when was it at its worst, well I'd argue that downtown Detroit was really at its worst from the late 80s through early-2000s. Crime was a far more problem, downtown really emptied-out after business hours, there was no draw for people to come downtown in the evenings or weekends. Lack of restaurants in the downtown area other than dive bars for the most part. Lots of empty buildings, empty storefronts, empty streetscapes. Bad urban planning.

Downtown first started to pick-up a bit, with least a reason to go downtown more first with sports, the casinos, and shows at the Fox Theather. Comerica Park opening up in 1999/2000 put more people in the downtown core in the evenings. The Riverwalk opened-up the riverfront. There was a lot of hype surrounding the 2005 All Star Game and when Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, however the bottom fell out with the economic recession and the collapse of the auto industry from 2008-2009. Since 2010, things have really gotten better and now there is a lot of momentum like there never has been in decades.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 10:20 AM
 
130 posts, read 166,671 times
Reputation: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
1. Yes. However a lot of awesome buildings were torn down int he last 40 years, so architecturally, it was better 40 years ago. More run down than now, but less was missing. It actually had even greater potential before the City government became obsessed with creating empty lots. However as far as overall condition - I woudl say it is overall better than any time int eh last 40 years. Some neighborhoods were in better shape than they are now, but as a City as a whole, Detroit is far more attractive than it has been in recent history.

2. . . . that is difficult. Just considering downtown, I would say about 2009 or 2010, although it was worse in the 1980s in some ways. In 2009 it was rundown and empty. Not scary because no one was there. In the 1980s it was often scary downtown, especially in the vicinity of Brush Park.

If you include the neighborhoods, I would say definitely 2009 - 2012, maybe a bit later.
I agree with this and the other posters. I started to write a long response but they've pretty much covered what I was going to write. A couple of things though that others haven't written:

1) one of the first desperate things done to rebuild Detroit was to bring in casinos. While they have brought in much needed tax revenue to the city of Detroit, they and their accompanying parking ramps have pretty much destroyed the streetscape of their surrounding streets. Wish they would have thought out their placement a little better but then again there was little vibrancy to destroy back then when they were built.

2) Forty years ago I was a resident, now I'm just an occasional visitor, so my perspective might be a little different now than it was then. But forty years ago it seemed, without regard to race, that many people walked around with a chip on their shoulder and body language if not actual language seemed confrontational. There were historical reasons for that but it was still not very pleasant. Now when I'm in Detroit it seems the opposite, most people are open and confident and welcoming. I like the physical changes, the new buildings and such as much as anyone, but it is the attitude change I like the best.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,259 posts, read 74,492,155 times
Reputation: 38296
Quote:
Originally Posted by walker46 View Post
2) Forty years ago I was a resident, now I'm just an occasional visitor, so my perspective might be a little different now than it was then. But forty years ago it seemed, without regard to race, that many people walked around with a chip on their shoulder and body language if not actual language seemed confrontational. There were historical reasons for that but it was still not very pleasant. Now when I'm in Detroit it seems the opposite, most people are open and confident and welcoming. I like the physical changes, the new buildings and such as much as anyone, but it is the attitude change I like the best.
I noticed this too. It was dramatic to me becasue I went to school in Detroit in 1981 - 1985 and visited frequently during the following three years, but then moved to California until 2005. I returned in 2005 and started working downtown in late 2007. The more pleasant atmosphere really developed around 2014 or 2015 I think. It is pretty new. Prior to 2014 or so, there was no atmosphere downtown, it was mostly empty except for homeless people. It may have been a year or two earlier, I do not remember the exact year it started to come alive again. However the emptiness in 2007 through at least 2010 was spooky.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 07:51 PM
 
Location: 404
2,883 posts, read 1,182,301 times
Reputation: 2497
I keep wondering what will be Detroit's final geographic size. It grew so rapidly that the city planners abandoned the diagonals and radials for a basic grid. That transition could be a boundary for a more stable city after the end of the car age.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2018, 08:47 AM
 
1,969 posts, read 2,823,343 times
Reputation: 2232
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
when was Detroit at its worst?
2018, the neighborhoods of Detroit have never looked worse. Downtown 40 year ago had a lot more buildings, more OFFICE WORKERS, and a lot less parking lots. We still had a commuter rail system.

Downtown Detroit is on an upper trajectory, but, IMO, it was better 40 years ago for the reasons stated above. Downtown is now a place where people live, which was not the case 40 years ago. But the number of office workers downtown are lower than 40 years ago. I would say the nadir was the late 90's just before Comerica Park, the casinos, and Campus Martius.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: 404
2,883 posts, read 1,182,301 times
Reputation: 2497
Topheavy economies with too many managers and paper pushers inevitably crash. China ate our lunch because we gave them the job of making it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2018, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
7,008 posts, read 11,121,092 times
Reputation: 5769
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
2018, the neighborhoods of Detroit have never looked worse. Downtown 40 year ago had a lot more buildings, more OFFICE WORKERS, and a lot less parking lots. We still had a commuter rail system.

Downtown Detroit is on an upper trajectory, but, IMO, it was better 40 years ago for the reasons stated above. Downtown is now a place where people live, which was not the case 40 years ago. But the number of office workers downtown are lower than 40 years ago. I would say the nadir was the late 90's just before Comerica Park, the casinos, and Campus Martius.
This issue doesn't seem to be as talked about by people boosting and rooting for Detroit, the inner city neighborhoods that have deteriorated for decades. I wonder why?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan > Detroit

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:24 PM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top