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Old 05-05-2010, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,696,065 times
Reputation: 391

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Worst Detroit Suburbs? I'd have to say parts of Warren, Center Line, Hazel Park, Roseville, Inkster, and Mount Clemens. These areas are full of bad neighborhoods, bad people and high crime. Stay away.
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Old 05-05-2010, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,696,065 times
Reputation: 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by [JS] View Post
The actual city of St. Clair, not St. Clair Shores. By that I meant that the actual city of St. Clair is the closest thing you will get to an excellent suburb.

Test scores do not really matter in the case of Royal Oak Schools. First off, they've cut bussing and all art programs for the city come next year. That means no band, no art, no vocal music classes. Second of all, the middle school has been arsonized twice and there have been multiple stabbing incidents. They had to take PLASTIC KNIVES away from the school lunch program because too many students were shoving them up against eachother's jugular veins and threatening to kill them. The students have sex in the bathroom there all the time. Yeah, send your kid there; but when he buys a big bag of weed on the staircase and loses his virginity to a 17 year old flunkie in the 8th grade, don't say I didn't tell you so.

I've driven past houses where the awnings were falling off, the doors (and some windows) were barred up or boarded up, the lawns were well more than uncut, there was trash in the yard, cardboard sheets were taped to the windows, the tops of houses have been left covered in tarp for years because there's no roof... you name it, I've probably seen it.

And being a teenager myself, I know how dangerous other teenagers are. Alot of the teens are reckless and like to get into trouble. They pick fights at the littlest of things. They carry knives around and threaten little kids with them. Not to mention all the shoplifting and grafitti...

Downtown, Vinsetta and south of 12 Mile are the only places I can really say good things about.
I would LOVE you to give me addresses of blighted homes in Royal Oak.
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Royal Oak, MI
333 posts, read 1,036,362 times
Reputation: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
I would LOVE you to give me addresses of blighted homes in Royal Oak.
Just for an example, turn east on Starr St. from Woodward. Look north and drive towards Coolidge. You can't miss it.

Turn north on Hampton from Normandy and look west. If the owner's home, his truck should be parked on his overgrown lawn infront of his house completely covered in poorly-painted dark blue wood paneling that somehow doesn't manage to hide his cruddy windows.

This isn't including the numerous foreclosures, although truely, those are the exceptions to blight.

It's certainly not Detroit, but I'd much rather live in Clawson, Berkley, or even Ferndale any day of the week.

Still, you're the one saying that Hazel Park and Warren are comparable to Centerline and Roseville.

Hazel Park; don't live on Harding, Crossley or Muir and lock your doors when you leave your house. It was a bad city for like, two years while the economy was crap. If you were to go through Hazel Park as much as I do, you'd notice that the forclosures are finally being bought, the businesses are finally being opened again, and people are getting their jobs back. Enough said.

Warren; stay north of Toepfer and again, lock your doors. Not that hard.

Last edited by Northsider 248; 05-05-2010 at 11:01 PM..
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Old 05-07-2010, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,696,065 times
Reputation: 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by [JS] View Post
Just for an example, turn east on Starr St. from Woodward. Look north and drive towards Coolidge. You can't miss it.

Turn north on Hampton from Normandy and look west. If the owner's home, his truck should be parked on his overgrown lawn infront of his house completely covered in poorly-painted dark blue wood paneling that somehow doesn't manage to hide his cruddy windows.

This isn't including the numerous foreclosures, although truely, those are the exceptions to blight.

It's certainly not Detroit, but I'd much rather live in Clawson, Berkley, or even Ferndale any day of the week.

Still, you're the one saying that Hazel Park and Warren are comparable to Centerline and Roseville.

Hazel Park; don't live on Harding, Crossley or Muir and lock your doors when you leave your house. It was a bad city for like, two years while the economy was crap. If you were to go through Hazel Park as much as I do, you'd notice that the forclosures are finally being bought, the businesses are finally being opened again, and people are getting their jobs back. Enough said.

Warren; stay north of Toepfer and again, lock your doors. Not that hard.
OK, 2 homes that are poorly maintained aren't that bad. Macomb Township (where I live) is considered nice, and is one of the fastest-growing communities in Michigan, and it has more than 2 abandoned properties. Sure, there's a size and population difference, but still, for a municipality of any size, 2 poorly maintained homes is nothing.
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Old 05-10-2010, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Royal Oak, MI
333 posts, read 1,036,362 times
Reputation: 91
Those are just two examples off of the top of my mind. If I was a licensed driver, I could drive down these streets and note hundreds of houses.
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Old 05-11-2010, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Detroit's Marina District
970 posts, read 2,696,065 times
Reputation: 391
Quote:
Originally Posted by [JS] View Post
Those are just two examples off of the top of my mind. If I was a licensed driver, I could drive down these streets and note hundreds of houses.
Hundreds? Are you sure we're talking about the same Royal Oak here?
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Old 05-15-2010, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Royal Oak, MI
333 posts, read 1,036,362 times
Reputation: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remisc View Post
Hundreds? Are you sure we're talking about the same Royal Oak here?
Well, there are 30,000 houses in Royal Oak so hundreds may be an over-exaggeration. Still, there's at least 60 in the whole city for sure, plus numerous forclosures.
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Old 05-15-2010, 06:18 PM
 
Location: north of Windsor, ON
1,903 posts, read 5,157,136 times
Reputation: 652
Macomb Township has like a gazillion mobile homes too, varying widely in size and condition. Before the housing boom ten years ago, they counted for a good percentage of the population.
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Old 05-15-2010, 07:51 PM
 
56,644 posts, read 49,822,041 times
Reputation: 17457
Interesting. I have seen this entire thread and no one has once mentioned Lathrup Village.
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Old 05-16-2010, 03:51 PM
 
6,791 posts, read 7,443,020 times
Reputation: 6973
Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
Interesting. I have seen this entire thread and no one has once mentioned Lathrup Village.
I think that's because it's small and not a place people generally drive through, no one mentioned Huntington Woods, or Pleasant Ridge either, I think for the same reason, but these cities have great reputations and are loved by their residents.
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