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Old 10-25-2013, 12:08 PM
Status: "Trump: Yes, I speak Asian" (set 8 days ago)
 
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I thought I would start a thread into which people can contribute their suggestions concerning what to eat and not eat, to keep blood sugar levels within normal limits.

Now, I subscribe to the 'very low carb' viewpoint, endorsed by medical doctors such as Dr. Bernstein. As such, I try to keep my total carbs per day below 30 grams.

Some of my suggestions or discoveries:

Ketchup: I love ketchup, but regular ketchup has too many carbs. I have switched over to Heinz's Low Sugar, which has worked well for me. I do, however, hate the price (around $2.40 for a small bottle).

Popcorn: out completely. I was shocked at how much just a cup of popcorn raises my blood sugar (over 200). Of course, I now know that any corn product is prohibited.

Fried chicken: In theory, one may eat fried chicken (from restaurant) if you avoid the coating. I have been making my own fried chicken for two years using Atkins Baking Mix. However, it is becoming difficult to find (they may be discontinuing it). A few weeks ago I read where some diabetics use pork rinds. I have done so, and the chicken came out fabulous (I had never, ever, eaten a pork rind in my life prior to this). My recipe:

Take one bag of pork rinds and empty into a food processor, and grind it up. I then add spices (poultry seasoning, Italian herb mix, garlic powder, black pepper), and grind it again. I do not add salt since the pork rinds have plenty of salt.

Dip your chicken pieces (I use boneless, skinless thighs, with low water/sodium content) into a bowl of eggs (using a fork to 'scramble' the eggs, of course), then into your baggie containing the pork rind mixture, then into your oil. I use Rice Bran Oil (which had been recommended by Dr. Oz), which has a very high flash point (some 500 degrees), and is supposed to be a very healthy oil. I have also used Grapeseed Oil, which does as well. Your chicken will come out with a beautiful, crisp coating.


Bread: virtually all bread is forbidden. I have gotten to like using Bob's Red Mill Low Carb bread mix. It has a minimal effect on my blood sugar levels. If you wish to try it, do not follow the instructions on the package. If interested, let me know and I will provide my recipe (I am not at my computer that has the instructions I developed at the moment).

Candy: Atkins makes several candy bars that are low glycemic. I particularly like the caramel nut chew bar. Walmart is the cheapest place to buy a box (even then, around $5.50 for a box of five).

For those interested in finding products with low carbs, I can recommend two internet sites:

Netrition: Netrition.com - The Internet's Premier Nutrition Superstore!

Click on the 'low carb' link in the upper left hand corner. Excellent customer service, fast and inexpensive shipping, and a lot of products.

Another is a company called LC foods: LC Foods | Low Carb - Sugar Free - Gluten Free - Diabetic Friendly Baking Ingredients & Products

Note that Netrition also sells LC products, but if you buy directly from LC you can save money. I can particularly recommend the LC Pizza/Bagel dough mix. I now regularly make pizzas using this product, which has minimal affect on blood sugar levels (using pizza sauce I get off Netrition). Again, do not follow their instructions; let me know, and I will again give you my recipe (actually, see below).

Indeed, I will close by saying that many of the foods you get from Netrition or LC Foods have one common problem: their recipes are 'dumbed down' so that there are as few steps as possible. Through trial and error I have perfected (in my mind) some of the recipes making additions/deletions as required.

Note that on Netrition website, under the Pizza dough product, they have reviews, in which I (Louis) contributed my pizza dough recipe:

LC Foods Pizza & Bagel Flour

LC Foods does not have a place for user reviews. If LC has a product I am interested in, I go to Netrition and read the reviews. Again, for LC products, it is usually cheaper to purchase from the company itself. Netrition does have very good prices for most of their products.

I would be very interested in hearing from others on how they make their favorite foods low-carb.
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Old 10-25-2013, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
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I peel apples and pears then simmer the chunks in diet black cherry soda until soft. At the end, I add a touch of cinnamon. This keeps well without refrigeration or it can be cold. I love a few pieces after a meal, as desert.
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Old 10-25-2013, 06:06 PM
Status: "Trump: Yes, I speak Asian" (set 8 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
I peel apples and pears then simmer the chunks in diet black cherry soda until soft. At the end, I add a touch of cinnamon. This keeps well without refrigeration or it can be cold. I love a few pieces after a meal, as desert.
That sounds pretty good. Does it affect your blood sugar, due to the apples and pears? I will note that I have read that cinnamon is helpful in controlling 'spikes' in blood sugar, although I have not tried it.
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Old 10-25-2013, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
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Not unless I overdo it.
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Old 10-26-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
I peel apples and pears then simmer the chunks in diet black cherry soda until soft. At the end, I add a touch of cinnamon. This keeps well without refrigeration or it can be cold. I love a few pieces after a meal, as desert.
What is your diet soda sweetened with? I've heard you shouldn't do this if it's sweetened with aspartame and it wouldn't be sweet anyway. Sounds delicious though.

Legalsea, your mention of ketchup reminded me of a recipe I've not tried yet but intend to in the near future. I'm not a big ketchup fan though but I do like sometimes. This one looks easy enough and it is a lacto-fermented food, meaning that it's not only not bad for you, but actually good for you and has probiotic qualities. The link to it is: Easy Lacto-Fermented Ketchup | Girl Meets NourishmentGirl Meets Nourishment

Quote:
14 ounces organic tomato paste (preferably in glass jars like this)
1/4 cup + 2 teaspoons organic raw honey
1 teaspoon + 1/4 teaspoon sea salt (like this)
2 tablespoons + 1/2 tablespoon organic raw apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup liquid whey
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon cayenne
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
dash of organic fish sauce (optional)

1. Mix all the ingredients together in a bowl until well combined.

2. Pour into a mason jar and seal loosely, allow to ferment on the counter for 2 to 5 days.
You could probably replace the honey with stevia and the whey is something you can skim off the top of your plain yogurt or you can take dannon yogurt or another good brand and drain it in a strainer overnight and then you have greek yogurt and a bunch of whey. The recipe I got said to seal this tightly when you put it on the counter for a few days but LF causes gases to escape so I don't think it would be a good idea and I changed it to "seal loosely."

A (slightly) amusing story about ketchup. I love to travel and have been to Britain, Oz, and New Zealand and in each of these countries when you order a plate of chips, or fries as they're known here, they will give you a huge plate of them--enough for 4 people, and one tiny little packet of ketchup. Now as I said, I'm not a huge fan of ketchup but I do like to dip my fries in and even with dipping just the teeniest little corner of each fry we still ran out 1/4 of the way thru the plate and asked for more, only to be greeted with eyeball rolling at "those crazy Americans." LOL. After that we bought our own bottle of it and kept it handy for chip emergencies.

Last edited by stepka; 10-26-2013 at 09:23 AM..
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Old 10-27-2013, 08:01 AM
Status: "Trump: Yes, I speak Asian" (set 8 days ago)
 
8,497 posts, read 4,794,450 times
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That is funny about the ketchup overseas! I also have experienced that at British pubs and such.

"Please, may I have some ketchup?"

"Certainly sir" (handing over a small packet).

"Ah, could I have some more?"

"What? You need another packet?"


I will be interested in hearing if you try that homemade ketchup. I fear that removing the honey (which is a bit over one-fourth of a cup) will materially change the body of the ketchup.

A word about yogurt: I had to stop eating even plain cow's milk yogurt, since it has too many carbs (yogurt that is sweetened with fruit is simply out of the question). However, plain goat yogurt only has some six or seven carbs per cup, and I sweeten it with liquid Stevia, as well as some drops of flavoring.

Here is a link to Amazon featuring flavor oils that I recently purchased, and which, so far, have worked well for flavoring yogurt:

LorAnn Hard Candy Flavoring Oils 10 Pack YOU PICK THE FLAVORS: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food

Note that after you make your purchase, you return to the 'your orders' page, and send the Seller an email listing the ten flavors you want. These come in very, very small bottles. Yet, the flavors are so strong that you only need a few drops for a cup of yogurt (along with some ten drops of Stevia). Some of the reviewers state that using an eyedropper is helpful, which I am starting to think is true. For instance, for the "lime" flavor, I at first simply used a cap-full (from the small bottle), but it made it a bit too limey. Blimey.

I will also mention that if you have a Kroger's supermarket, they sell their own brand of low-carb yogurt that is excellent. Mind: it is not 'true yogurt', but it does have some beneficial bacteria added. I think it is called 'low carb masters' or such, found in the yogurt section.
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Old 10-28-2013, 11:00 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,255 posts, read 15,197,578 times
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I just checked the carb content of my whole milk FAGE yogurt and it has 9 carb gms in a cup. Since I'm not diabetic I'm not sure how many you can have but it has 20 gms of protein and 11 of fat. I also use essential oils for flavoring--I get them at the health food store and they have a shaker cap so you can only get out one drop at a time and that's usually enough. I never thought of using them to flavor yogurt but I'm going to try it.

I think I'm going to try the ketchup this week--may not be able to lose the honey altogether but will try decreasing it. I'm trying very hard to cut down on sugar myself b/c it is so addicting to me.
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Old 12-04-2013, 07:13 AM
Status: "Trump: Yes, I speak Asian" (set 8 days ago)
 
8,497 posts, read 4,794,450 times
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For the past couple of weeks I have been making low-carb enchiladas.

I had purchased some low-carb tortillas from Netrition, but I then found yet another brand at Walmart.

Turns out to be a very simple dish. If anyone would like the recipe, let me know (I do not yet have it memorized or exact) and I will work on writing down a definitive version.

However, essentially, for sour cream chicken enchiladas mix in one bowl shredded (cooked) chicken (I use rotisserie chicken found at Costco), chopped white onion, some enchilada sauce (the kind for chicken), some jalapeno salsa, and some chili salsa.

In another bowl, two cups of regular sour cream, some of the foregoing enchilada sauce, salsa (regular salsa, as hot as you desire; we use mild or medium) and chopped jalapenos. I cannot recall what else I add; I used basically recipes found online. Get it to the taste you want, adding other salsas if you wish.

Take your tortilla, spoon in the chicken mixture (adding shredded cheddar cheese if desired). Take a pan and coat the bottom with the sour cream mixture, then place your wrapped tortillas (seam side down), then cover them with the sour cream mixture, then top all with the shredded cheese, cover the pan tightly with foil, and bake for 25 minutes at 350 degrees.

For beef enchiladas: pound of ground beef in stove-top pan, along with chopped onions. Brown the meat (using spatula to chop up the meat while cooking) and also add during cooking: powdered chili, cumin, black pepper, salt, half a can of brown enchilada sauce, and perhaps some jalapeno salsa. When the meat is cooked, taste and add whatever to your taste. Again, spoon meat into tortillas, put in your pan, cover with the remaining brown enchilada sauce, cover with cheese, and bake as before.

Of course, for cheese enchiladas simply fill your tortilla with shredded cheese.

To date, my 'recipe' is not exact. My last batch was declared 'excellent', but I did not write down exactly what I was doing in the kitchen. I told my wife that we needed an assistant to observe and write down what we do. Nevertheless, it is a surprisingly quick dish to prepare, and has only a mild effect on my blood sugar levels (perhaps 30 points, if I eat three at once).

Netrition also sells low-carb pita bread, which is good eating. Some of the reviewers for the pita bread (Netrition has reviews for most of their products) note that the pita bread makes a very good small pizza, although I have yet to try it. I shall post after I have done so.
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