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Old 06-25-2008, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,467 posts, read 10,817,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
Agree on the likely cause of the sweet tooth...

Disagree on eating too much sugar "causing diabetes"...

You can't "catch" diabetes by eating too much sugar, there is no correlation between the two. However, obesity is certainly a risk factor for developing Type II Diabetes so indirectly, eating too much sugar can lead to the condition if you have weight gain related to the sweet tooth.
I definitely see your point, however, I see someone who eats a lot of sugar putting themselves at risk for obseity (most likely), and then possibly developing diabetes, especially when they have the genetics for it. Regardless, if you have that genetic link, you really need to follow the advice of good diet and exercise
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Old 06-25-2008, 03:55 PM
 
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This is strictly my opinion of course, but eating a lot of sugar doesn't seem to me to be a sign of diabetes as much as it is a sign of vitamin & mineral deficiencies, as well as poor diet choices in other areas that end up giving you sugar cravings. Excessive sugar intake certainly isn't a way to avoid diabetes though.

Sugar can be very addicting, just like drugs or alcohol. And when you eat it a lot every day it's very tough to pull away from it, but it can be done.
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Old 06-25-2008, 04:20 PM
 
3,866 posts, read 9,609,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessiegirl_98 View Post
I definitely see your point, however, I see someone who eats a lot of sugar putting themselves at risk for obseity (most likely), and then possibly developing diabetes, especially when they have the genetics for it. Regardless, if you have that genetic link, you really need to follow the advice of good diet and exercise
Yep, I agree. Chances are. the person who eats a lot of sugar containing products will gain weight and that does certainly increase the risk of developing Type II diabetes.

Certainly it diabetes runs in your family you should also try to eat a healthy diet and maintain a healthy weight.

But you are no more likely to "overload" the pancreas by eating a lot of sugar than you are to run out of any other hormone by stressing the body.
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Old 06-25-2008, 04:29 PM
 
Location: South FL
9,444 posts, read 14,241,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j760 View Post
This is strictly my opinion of course, but eating a lot of sugar doesn't seem to me to be a sign of diabetes as much as it is a sign of vitamin & mineral deficiencies, as well as poor diet choices in other areas that end up giving you sugar cravings. Excessive sugar intake certainly isn't a way to avoid diabetes though.

Sugar can be very addicting, just like drugs or alcohol. And when you eat it a lot every day it's very tough to pull away from it, but it can be done.
Aha.
I would give you another rep point, but i need to spread it out.
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Old 06-25-2008, 07:35 PM
 
Location: In the real world!
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I will tell you what I have found in my many years of eating a lot of sweets and my decision to try to eat healthier. I have CRAVED sweet like mad and the more I feed that craving, the more I want. If I can go ONE day without anything sweet, that craving is just about gone the next day... the second day, there is NO craving. When I feed that sweet craving, I am feeding it and making it grow.. The more you eat, the more you want....it's that simple!

Wanted to add that I have also found the more sweets I eat, the harder it is to loose weight. I can eat a BIG lunch but if I can skip that piece of pie or cake after lunch, the next day I have lost weight... I can maintain that weight until I give in and eat that pie or cake then BHAM, there it IS again!
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Old 06-26-2008, 06:44 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,490 times
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Default Re: Is Eating a lot of Sugar a sign of diabetes?

Hey you should discuss this with your doctor.. According to me you may not have eaten enough sugar usually you can eat something sweet and drink water and relax for a few times…

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<a href="http://www.diabetesrecipesdiet.com/">Diabetes Diet</a>, Diabetes Recipes Directory (broken link), Health Directory (broken link)
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Old 06-26-2008, 09:00 AM
 
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The 3 major Signs of Diabetes: Polyuria (urinating large amts.), polyphagia (eating larger amts. of anything), polydipsia (drinking more fluids).
Eating too much sugar or simple carbs will decrease insulin sensitivity, meaning it reduces the ability of the insulin to go into the cell, and metabolize carbs, fats and proteins. So, if you eat too much sugar/carbs, your body's insulin activity is reduced. Not good for anyone but esp. for someone who is borderline or w/a family history of diabetes, type 2.
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Old 06-26-2008, 11:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix lady View Post
The 3 major Signs of Diabetes: Polyuria (urinating large amts.), polyphagia (eating larger amts. of anything), polydipsia (drinking more fluids).
Eating too much sugar or simple carbs will decrease insulin sensitivity, meaning it reduces the ability of the insulin to go into the cell, and metabolize carbs, fats and proteins. So, if you eat too much sugar/carbs, your body's insulin activity is reduced. Not good for anyone but esp. for someone who is borderline or w/a family history of diabetes, type 2.
You listed the top 3 symptoms not signs of diabetes....

Also, insulin resistance is a little more complex than you make it seem and it does not have to do with eating too much sugar or carbs...

Eating too much sugar or carbs does not decrease insulin sensitivity...

Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:57 AM
 
6,809 posts, read 9,120,272 times
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Doogie Howser--
Symptoms are subjective--the person experiences it. How could "eating too much" be considered objective? Is there an objective view, by a physician, about what "too much is." The person determines it, according to their experience ie)subjective. Same with drinking too much. For one person, it might be 6 glasses a day, for another that would be too much compared to their "normal". A physician can't objectify or measure how much you're drinking--you would determine that as your experience.
Objective or signs might be: Blood glucose fasting is 295, dry redenned skin, walks unsteady into exam room.
Insulin sensitivity is not wholly determined by diet alone, but it is influenced by what you eat. The way your cells take in insulin and how carbs/proteins/fats are absorbed into that cell (metabolism) is influenced by the types of food eaten or diet. If you eat honey on white bread versus a yam, your insulin response is going to be different. Most diabetes organizations have alot of info on their sites about the glycemic index of foods because they know it's a strong factor (what you eat) in controlling diabetes and/or preventing it. There are other factors in insulin sensitivity, too, as you alluded to.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 06-27-2008 at 10:24 AM..
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Old 06-27-2008, 11:45 AM
 
3,866 posts, read 9,609,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix lady View Post
Doogie Howser--
Symptoms are subjective--the person experiences it. How could "eating too much" be considered objective? Is there an objective view, by a physician, about what "too much is." The person determines it, according to their experience ie)subjective. Same with drinking too much. For one person, it might be 6 glasses a day, for another that would be too much compared to their "normal". A physician can't objectify or measure how much you're drinking--you would determine that as your experience.
Objective or signs might be: Blood glucose fasting is 295, dry redenned skin, walks unsteady into exam room.
Insulin sensitivity is not wholly determined by diet alone, but it is influenced by what you eat. The way your cells take in insulin and how carbs/proteins/fats are absorbed into that cell (metabolism) is influenced by the types of food eaten or diet. If you eat honey on white bread versus a yam, your insulin response is going to be different. Most diabetes organizations have alot of info on their sites about the glycemic index of foods because they know it's a strong factor (what you eat) in controlling diabetes and/or preventing it. There are other factors in insulin sensitivity, too, as you alluded to.


OMG, too funny....

How could you get the definition absolutely correct and the application completely wrong...

Lets review: YOU called Polyuria, Polydipsia and Polyphagia the top 3 SIGNS of diabetes. ie: objective observations

I corrected you that these were in fact SUBJECTIVE SYMPTOMS, not SIGNS...non quantifiable subjective assessments of a patient.

Who were you lecturing in the first paragraph?? Yourself??

And again, while diabetics need to be aware of the glycemic index of the foods they are eating, people who do not have the condition do not. They are NOT going to develop insulin resistance based on the amount of sugar they eat, at least not as a direct cause and effect.

I have linked this before, directly from the ADA, look at "myth" #3 Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes. Answer: NO

Diabetes Myths - All About Diabetes - American Diabetes Association

Last edited by bluedevilz; 06-27-2008 at 11:51 AM.. Reason: link
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