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Old 02-05-2015, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
22,548 posts, read 24,138,638 times
Reputation: 48942

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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
So is there a breakfast cereal out there that's healthy?
I've read that a good rule of thumb for cereal is 5 grams or fewer of sugar and 5 grams or more of fiber.
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Old 02-05-2015, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,862,107 times
Reputation: 10243
I do agree that we have free will and no one forces us to eat certain foods--whether they are nutritious or not. We can choose a healthy diet.

It is interesting to note, though, that other cultures have different ways of eating. The French, for instance, rarely snack between meals as we do. Junk food is much less in evidence there than here. They eat nutritious foods, some high in calories, such as real butter and pate, but their portion sizes are much smaller than ours

And many countries ban, to a lesser or greater degree, some of the food sold in the U.S. due to their additives, hormones and such. GMO's are not so welcome in other places as here.

But, I do not rule out the temptations of aisles after aisles of junk food and the powerful advertising that encourages & influences us to consume these unhealthy and unnecessary snacks that are calorically heavy and nutritionally light.

Sure, once again, it's free will, but if they weren't on offer, we couldn't purchase them. The U.S. is junk food central...highly profitable and heavily marketed.

Advertising of junk food, unfortunately, is highly effective and well-subsidized. The Sugar Council is much more monied than the Broccoli Council, for instance...
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Old 02-05-2015, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Where rhotic consonants are either absent or intrusive
8,903 posts, read 5,236,531 times
Reputation: 14605
While not always a popular cereal, I've been a Grape-Nuts eater since I was a little kid, eaten dry . Check out Cascadian brand, which has less junky version of popular cereals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
So is there a breakfast cereal out there that's healthy? I've never been a cereal eater, but my kids do eat a small bowl of cereal most mornings. Currently their favorite is Raisin Bran For me, I eat a greek yogurt and sprinkle in about 2 tablespoons of granola, plus a banana.

Anyway, no one in our family has a weight problem, and the cereal my kids eat is in moderation. But I've known people who graze on boxes of cereal... huge bowls of it at all times of the day. Maybe that's more the problem.
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,888 posts, read 25,319,935 times
Reputation: 26382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscoe Conkling View Post
I counted 42 different high-sugar breakfast cereals at my local Wal-Mart today. 42 !
The least-busiest aisle was produce and the biggest queue was at the pre-cooked lunch counter.
The 300lbs lady in front of me at the check-out was so fat she was in a motorized wheelchair provided by the store to help her shop because walking was too much of a strain.
She had her son with her who I would say was about 14-years-old and he must have weighed 200lbs.
Her final bill came to $96 dollars - there wasn't a single piece of vegetable or fruit among what she'd bought and virtually everything was food which didn't need any preparation other than opening a packet.
I guestimated 75% of the people in the store were obese.
There just doesn't seem to be a lot of shame about being fat in America these days.
I am an average size person. Being female, I always want to lose weight. It's the you can't be too rich or too thin thing.

I try really hard to almost NEVER eat fruit. Loaded with sugar. I probably have 10 or 12 servings of fruit per year. I do eat a lot of plain green veggies though. And I cook almost all my food instead of buying the prepackaged crap. I had to stop and think about the breakfast cereal thing. I haven't had a single serving of that stuff for decades. I do have oatmeal a few times a year.

Your experience would have been much different if you had been at Whole Foods, aka Whole Paycheck. Walmart is full of people who have to stretch a buck. Why else would you shop there? It's dismal.

Poor and fat go together like red beans and rice. Poor folks buy packaged foods because they can afford no waste/spoilage and their time is a premium. Many work multiple low paying physically stressful jobs and they are tired when they come home and they still have to clean, do laundry, bathe the kids, and do homework. It's tough. Prepackaged foods are cheaper and dinner can be on the table in minutes and your kids will eat it. Try doing that with a pot of lentil soup...

It's possible to eat a completely healthy diet shopping at Walmart. But it's more expensive and time consuming. The folks at Walmart are generally short on 2 things, time and money. Cheap and fast is what they can afford. I cook and I know how to make tasty meals that are healthy and cheap. My mom and grandmas taught me. Most of the people out there today didn't have the luxury of SAHM or grandmas because everyone had to work. They never learned to make or appreciate a home cooked meal. Everything came out of a box.

To eat well today you need at least one of 2 things. Time or money. My luxury is time. I can shop. Here an example for you. Let's say I want to make a huge batch of tuna salad for the majority of my meals for the week. This is something I make quite often so I know the prices.

Me VS the Walmart Shopper

Me

$9 6lb can of tuna from Costco
$4 big jar of Hellman's Mayo from Costco(there would be leftovers)
$1.29 1 doz large eggs from Smith's
$1 jar of Claussen's pickle relish from the 99centsOnly Store
$1 celery from the 99centsOnly Store
$1 onions from the 99centsOnly Store
$1 cilantro from the 99centsOnly Store
Total cost $18 for about 25 meals, cost per meal 76 cents

Walmart Shopper

$25 20 cans tuna(they do have bigger size cans but they are usually more expensive than the small ones)
$7 1 large jar of Hellman's mayo
$2 1 doz large eggs
$2 jar of Claussen's pickle relish
$2 celery
$2 onions
$2 cilantro
Total cost $42 same 25 meals, cost per meal $1.68
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:38 PM
 
2,540 posts, read 3,474,244 times
Reputation: 5570
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
I do agree that we have free will and no one forces us to eat certain foods--whether they are nutritious or not. We can choose a healthy diet.

It is interesting to note, though, that other cultures have different ways of eating. The French, for instance, rarely snack between meals as we do. Junk food is much less in evidence there than here. They eat nutritious foods, some high in calories, such as real butter and pate, but their portion sizes are much smaller than ours
By now, other countries including France are exposed to a lot of American culture and media, including advertising. They have McDonalds, soda, and chips in Europe too, but the majority chooses not to eat it.
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:10 AM
Status: "Brexit bound" (set 24 days ago)
 
3,704 posts, read 2,018,371 times
Reputation: 5305
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I am an average size person. Being female, I always want to lose weight. It's the you can't be too rich or too thin thing.

I try really hard to almost NEVER eat fruit. Loaded with sugar. I probably have 10 or 12 servings of fruit per year. I do eat a lot of plain green veggies though. And I cook almost all my food instead of buying the prepackaged crap. I had to stop and think about the breakfast cereal thing. I haven't had a single serving of that stuff for decades. I do have oatmeal a few times a year.

Your experience would have been much different if you had been at Whole Foods, aka Whole Paycheck. Walmart is full of people who have to stretch a buck. Why else would you shop there? It's dismal.

Poor and fat go together like red beans and rice. Poor folks buy packaged foods because they can afford no waste/spoilage and their time is a premium. Many work multiple low paying physically stressful jobs and they are tired when they come home and they still have to clean, do laundry, bathe the kids, and do homework. It's tough. Prepackaged foods are cheaper and dinner can be on the table in minutes and your kids will eat it. Try doing that with a pot of lentil soup...

It's possible to eat a completely healthy diet shopping at Walmart. But it's more expensive and time consuming. The folks at Walmart are generally short on 2 things, time and money. Cheap and fast is what they can afford. I cook and I know how to make tasty meals that are healthy and cheap. My mom and grandmas taught me. Most of the people out there today didn't have the luxury of SAHM or grandmas because everyone had to work. They never learned to make or appreciate a home cooked meal. Everything came out of a box.

To eat well today you need at least one of 2 things. Time or money. My luxury is time. I can shop. Here an example for you. Let's say I want to make a huge batch of tuna salad for the majority of my meals for the week. This is something I make quite often so I know the prices.

Me VS the Walmart Shopper

Me

$9 6lb can of tuna from Costco
$4 big jar of Hellman's Mayo from Costco(there would be leftovers)
$1.29 1 doz large eggs from Smith's
$1 jar of Claussen's pickle relish from the 99centsOnly Store
$1 celery from the 99centsOnly Store
$1 onions from the 99centsOnly Store
$1 cilantro from the 99centsOnly Store
Total cost $18 for about 25 meals, cost per meal 76 cents

Walmart Shopper

$25 20 cans tuna(they do have bigger size cans but they are usually more expensive than the small ones)
$7 1 large jar of Hellman's mayo
$2 1 doz large eggs
$2 jar of Claussen's pickle relish
$2 celery
$2 onions
$2 cilantro
Total cost $42 same 25 meals, cost per meal $1.68
I disagree completely that it's not possible to eat healthily and cheaply at Walmart.
It's the very reason I shop there although the fact that it's the closest store to where I live is also a factor.
And to suggest that poor people shop there because they can't afford either the time or wastage and thus become obese really is stretching the bounds of credulity.
Without wishing to generalise in my opinion they buy pre-packaged,processed food because they're too feckless and lazy to prepare their own food.
Even a peasant living in a mud hut in Africa knows how to make a stew out of meat and vegetables.
An Asian woman working in a paddy field all day still manages to find time to feed her family instead of slumping in front of a television slurping a gallon of soda and puffing on a pack of cigarettes.
Here's a thought too - why not limit the range of goods that food stamps can be used to purchase to strictly healthy food ?
Because when it comes to poor people only being able to buy processed food you'd be amazed how many of them waddle out of Walmart to load their goods into some pretty decent cars.
You really don't need time and money to eat well in America - just a desire to improve your health and well-being and a small amount of dignity.
Food has never been cheaper or more available but this generation of children are unhealthier and will die younger than their parents.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:39 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 36,417,671 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscoe Conkling View Post
I disagree completely that it's not possible to eat healthily and cheaply at Walmart.
It's the very reason I shop there although the fact that it's the closest store to where I live is also a factor.
And to suggest that poor people shop there because they can't afford either the time or wastage and thus become obese really is stretching the bounds of credulity.
Without wishing to generalise in my opinion they buy pre-packaged,processed food because they're too feckless and lazy to prepare their own food.
Even a peasant living in a mud hut in Africa knows how to make a stew out of meat and vegetables.
An Asian woman working in a paddy field all day still manages to find time to feed her family instead of slumping in front of a television slurping a gallon of soda and puffing on a pack of cigarettes.
Here's a thought too - why not limit the range of goods that food stamps can be used to purchase to strictly healthy food ?
Because when it comes to poor people only being able to buy processed food you'd be amazed how many of them waddle out of Walmart to load their goods into some pretty decent cars.
You really don't need time and money to eat well in America - just a desire to improve your health and well-being and a small amount of dignity.
Food has never been cheaper or more available but this generation of children are unhealthier and will die younger than their parents.
How remarkably presumptuous of you. By the time I get home from work, it's suppertime. It isn't time to make supper - it's time to eat supper. I'm tired and hungry, and my spouse has already been home for over an hour waiting for me. Neither of us want to wait another hour, or two hours, and I certainly don't feel like slaving over a hot stove for an hour to prepare a sumptuous meal (or even slap peanutbutter and jelly on bread). So often, I'll pick something up on the way home instead. Sometimes a pizza. Sometimes lasagna with salad. Sometimes Burger King for the husband and I'll make myself a salad (I don't eat BK - he loves the stuff). Sometimes it's spit-roasted chicken and veggies from Boston Market.

I work 5 days a week, I have no interest in spending my weekends cooking and putting meal-sized portions in the freezer. We manage to be healthy - I'm around 20-25 pounds overweight, he is maybe a pound or two on the skinny side.

I also occasionally eat that pre-packaged processed food, especially if I'm coming home late from work and hubby has already eaten, so I don't have to stop on the way home just for him. I keep a couple packages in the freezer just in case.
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Old 02-06-2015, 06:08 AM
Status: "Brexit bound" (set 24 days ago)
 
3,704 posts, read 2,018,371 times
Reputation: 5305
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
How remarkably presumptuous of you. By the time I get home from work, it's suppertime. It isn't time to make supper - it's time to eat supper. I'm tired and hungry, and my spouse has already been home for over an hour waiting for me. Neither of us want to wait another hour, or two hours, and I certainly don't feel like slaving over a hot stove for an hour to prepare a sumptuous meal (or even slap peanutbutter and jelly on bread). So often, I'll pick something up on the way home instead. Sometimes a pizza. Sometimes lasagna with salad. Sometimes Burger King for the husband and I'll make myself a salad (I don't eat BK - he loves the stuff). Sometimes it's spit-roasted chicken and veggies from Boston Market.

I work 5 days a week, I have no interest in spending my weekends cooking and putting meal-sized portions in the freezer. We manage to be healthy - I'm around 20-25 pounds overweight, he is maybe a pound or two on the skinny side.

I also occasionally eat that pre-packaged processed food, especially if I'm coming home late from work and hubby has already eaten, so I don't have to stop on the way home just for him. I keep a couple packages in the freezer just in case.
Your spouse has already been home for an hour waiting for you to provide him with food ?
Also, you make a big deal about working five days a week. Hello, welcome to the real world.
I know plenty of families with both parents working who still manage to eat well without resorting to processed crap.
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Old 02-06-2015, 06:27 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,164 posts, read 20,464,230 times
Reputation: 26443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscoe Conkling View Post
Your spouse has already been home for an hour waiting for you to provide him with food ?
Also, you make a big deal about working five days a week. Hello, welcome to the real world.
I know plenty of families with both parents working who still manage to eat well without resorting to processed crap.
It's just as possible to get fat on homemade meals as it is with processed foods.
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Old 02-06-2015, 06:42 AM
Status: "Brexit bound" (set 24 days ago)
 
3,704 posts, read 2,018,371 times
Reputation: 5305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
It's just as possible to get fat on homemade meals as it is with processed foods.
But it's easier to lose weight on homemade meals than it is with processed food.
That way there's no-one else to blame for the ingredients.
We find it easier to blame others for our woes rather than take control of our own destiny.
I mean, really, how difficult is it to grill a piece of meat or fish,peel and boil a couple of potatoes while steaming some vegetables at the same time.
45 mins max.
About the same time it takes to fire up an oven,take out a frozen pizza and some fries and sit and watch TV while they're cooking.
Go figure.
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