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Old 06-03-2015, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Wine Country
5,362 posts, read 6,447,576 times
Reputation: 9862

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
No matter how many times you scream it from the rooftops the truth is that while the number of calories ingested is A FACTOR in weight control it is not the ONLY FACTOR in weight control.

There is a lot of literature out there on this subject.
Out of all that literature only a small part of it is actually accurate. The rest is just people trying to make a buck off of 'their' eating plan. Sure they have data, but there is ALL KINDS OF DATA regarding dieting.
A calorie is a calorie. It burns the same way no matter what the source of that calorie is. Should you eat junk? Obviously not. A healthy diet of whole fresh foods is obviously the best way to go.
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:14 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 36,438,287 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
No matter how many times you scream it from the rooftops the truth is that while the number of calories ingested is A FACTOR in weight control it is not the ONLY FACTOR in weight control.

There is a lot of literature out there on this subject.
Yes you're right. There's another factor: the number of calories burned.

So there's two factors: How many calories consumed, vs. how many calories burned. If you take in more than you burn off, you gain. If you take in less than you burn off, you lose. HOW you burn it has tons and tons of factors. Like - if you have a thyroid problem, you'll burn it differently than if you don't have a thyroid problem. If you have cancer, it'll burn differently. If you are a chronic overeater and have caused a change to your metabolism as a result, you'll burn it differently. If you exercise a lot, it'll burn differently than if you never exercise. If your exercise is mostly weight lifting, it'll burn differently than if your exercise was mostly running.

And so on and so forth, ad infinitum.

When all is said and done, however, it all boils down to two factors: Consume vs. burn.
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:33 PM
 
5,190 posts, read 4,053,270 times
Reputation: 13169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
Yes you're right. There's another factor: the number of calories burned.

So there's two factors: How many calories consumed, vs. how many calories burned. If you take in more than you burn off, you gain. If you take in less than you burn off, you lose. HOW you burn it has tons and tons of factors. Like - if you have a thyroid problem, you'll burn it differently than if you don't have a thyroid problem. If you have cancer, it'll burn differently. If you are a chronic overeater and have caused a change to your metabolism as a result, you'll burn it differently. If you exercise a lot, it'll burn differently than if you never exercise. If your exercise is mostly weight lifting, it'll burn differently than if your exercise was mostly running.

And so on and so forth, ad infinitum.

When all is said and done, however, it all boils down to two factors: Consume vs. burn.
Anonchick,

Would you mind explaining the bolded part?
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Old 06-03-2015, 10:21 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, USVI - Seattle, WA - Gulf Coast, TX
811 posts, read 732,430 times
Reputation: 2291
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
Anonchick,

Would you mind explaining the bolded part?
mochamajesty, I think I can help a bit with what Anonchick was referencing...

Your body's metabolism is clever. It tries hard to adjust to your habits in order to benefit your system. It adapts. Let's look at that scenario in the opposite direction that Anonchick did: If you cut your calorie consumption drastically (research has shown repeatedly that this average, "drastic" mark for women is <1200 calories/day, not sure what the average is for men), then your body's clever metabolism will realize that it needs to use those 1200 calories very efficiently to survive. This is sometimes referred to as "starvation mode." Your body tries to not waste a single calorie, so that when you lose 15lbs on a 1100 calorie/day diet and decide to celebrate with a double-bacon-cheeseburger, guess what? Your body will efficiently hold onto as many calories in that cheeseburger as possible and your 15lbs will reappear in no time. Your body has temporarily improved its efficiency at absorbing calories (your metabolism has slowed down).

Over-eating can cause the same inconsistencies or malfunctions in a body's metabolism. The point is that an individual's habits can change the way they absorb or don't absorb calories, and that there are some factors other than just straight calories, that affect weight loss/gain.

That said, calorie in v. calorie out is STILL the DOMINATING factor, far above mitigating with soluble fiber, complex carbs v. sugars, the way our bodies break down fats v. proteins... etc. Calories in vs. calories out is still what should be focused on. The diet industry tends to distract people with other, small factors in order to sell products. ("Fat is bad! No wait, sugar is bad! No wait, sugar is good it's just HF corn syrup that's bad!..." all basically nonsense.)
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Old 06-04-2015, 01:56 AM
 
5,190 posts, read 4,053,270 times
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Thanks, but I wanted more detail on that particular statement. I got the general point she was making.
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Old 06-04-2015, 06:25 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 36,438,287 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
Thanks, but I wanted more detail on that particular statement. I got the general point she was making.
IslandCityGirl explained it in detail.
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Old 06-04-2015, 06:42 AM
 
5,190 posts, read 4,053,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
IslandCityGirl explained it in detail.

She explained starvation mode, which I am assuming is not what happens to the chronic overeater.

"Over-eating can cause the same inconsistencies or malfunctions in a body's metabolism."

What inconsistencies or malfunctions?
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:28 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 36,438,287 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
She explained starvation mode, which I am assuming is not what happens to the chronic overeater.

"Over-eating can cause the same inconsistencies or malfunctions in a body's metabolism."

What inconsistencies or malfunctions?
I didn't say that - I said "If you are a chronic overeater and have caused a change to your metabolism as a result, you'll burn it differently."

Anything you do to change your metabolism will create a change in the efficiency of burning calories.

When you overeat consistently, your body starts trying to adjust for it. That's why overeating, and the resulting obesity, can cause diabetes. And it can trigger all kinds of other medical problems. It's not just "50 extra pounds I'm carrying around with me." It's all the extra food playing havoc against your organs and hormones.

Just like when you stop eating, become anorexic, that -also- changes your metabolism.
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Old 06-04-2015, 12:09 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, USVI - Seattle, WA - Gulf Coast, TX
811 posts, read 732,430 times
Reputation: 2291
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
She explained starvation mode, which I am assuming is not what happens to the chronic overeater.

"Over-eating can cause the same inconsistencies or malfunctions in a body's metabolism."

What inconsistencies or malfunctions?
Sorry, I was just trying to give a clear example of how the body's metabolism responds to our behavior/changes. I should have been more specific.

Anonchick hit it on the head with her description though. When you overeat, your body does not absorb quality nutrients as well as when your metabolism is healthy/balanced, as a starting point. It's trying to cope with too many calories coming in, so, along with attempting to absorb fewer calories, your body also absorbs fewer nutrients from food. I'm not sure if this is a direct cause and effect from the lower nutrient absorption, but your body also does something backwards hormonally when you overeat: it actually increases the levels of hormones in your system that cause your body to hang onto fat (so, in a sense, your body still goes into some sort of "starvation mode", even when you overeat). Being fat makes it harder to lose fat. What a lame situation! Anonchick also mentioned how insulin can be affected by overeating, as we're all pretty familiar with diabetes as an American epidemic these days.
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Old 06-04-2015, 12:29 PM
 
5,190 posts, read 4,053,270 times
Reputation: 13169
Quote:
Originally Posted by IslandCityGirl View Post
Sorry, I was just trying to give a clear example of how the body's metabolism responds to our behavior/changes. I should have been more specific.

Anonchick hit it on the head with her description though. When you overeat, your body does not absorb quality nutrients as well as when your metabolism is healthy/balanced, as a starting point. It's trying to cope with too many calories coming in, so, along with attempting to absorb fewer calories, your body also absorbs fewer nutrients from food. I'm not sure if this is a direct cause and effect from the lower nutrient absorption, but your body also does something backwards hormonally when you overeat: it actually increases the levels of hormones in your system that cause your body to hang onto fat (so, in a sense, your body still goes into some sort of "starvation mode", even when you overeat). Being fat makes it harder to lose fat. What a lame situation! Anonchick also mentioned how insulin can be affected by overeating, as we're all pretty familiar with diabetes as an American epidemic these days.

Thanks to you both. That is very informative and eye opening. No wonder it's so difficult to lose weight and keep it off.

How do you reliably determine what calories are right for you?
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