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Old 05-18-2017, 06:05 AM
 
3,921 posts, read 2,759,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Seriously? That's a serious question? Just look at the sodium content of the chain restaurants' offerings

Just how much sodium do restaurant meals have?

As for the non-chain restaurants, you'll be surprised at how much salt is in that food as well. And I don't know about you, but excessive sodium causes serious bloating and "cotton mouth".
Sorry, I was serious, I've never felt bad after eating at a restaurant. I was trying to get at what specifically you were ordering to cause this.

I've never had an issue with sodium.
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Old 05-18-2017, 06:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
Just remember we all have different metabolisms. Metabolism is not as simple as calories in calories out. What about salt metabolism? (Or at least how salt affects your body, and keep in mind there is not just one type of salt.) The common wisdom is that HBP patients have to limit salt uptake, yet I am not affected by salt intake problems. I ignore it on menus, I put whatever I like on my fries, I've even taken up salting salads, something I didn't do until maybe the last decade.

Salt is NOT the problem, except for some people! For many it may not be a problem at all, or for all I know maybe I'm the only person in the country who has no salt problems. You will have to decide for yourself. I'm not convinced that if we fix salt we have fixed the problem.

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I've never had problems with salt either. In fact, I was concerned I wasn't getting enough iodine because I don't salt anything but eggs. I'm eating more seafood now to try to make sure I get enough.

I agree with you about everyone having different metabolisms. According to one of your articles, your BMR gets 1-2% slower each year after a certain age. So no wonder those of us who are older have a harder time staying at a healthy weight! What is 2% x 30 years? Add in the menopause slow down, which one doctor described as your body changing to support just one life instead of being able to support two (mom and baby). Fun stuff.

Then add in various prescriptions, surgeries, injuries, lifestyle requirements that each individual person deals with as they age. And then, like Mikala says, you have the genetic tendencies that some people fight their whole lives, no matter how much exercise some get, their weights skew on the heavy side.

No need to mock each other's choices on how they fight their own battles. It's not one size fits all or we'd all be thin and healthy.
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Old 05-18-2017, 06:52 AM
Status: "back to AZ in 2020!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
103 posts, read 66,900 times
Reputation: 105
Could NOT agree more with the first post. As harsh or cruel as it sounds, being extremely overweight is unhealthy and it's everywhere around us. When I go to the grocery store and a younger clerk keys my produce bags, they usually don't key in everything right. It's not because of their lack of attention to detail..its simply because they DO NOT know what they are...Sad, but true. I can't deny my family doesn't make the occasional 'quick stop' into a fast food lane when traveling, but we cook as a family also [with fresh products!]. It's pretty funny when you have to tell your 4 year old that we can't buy every blueberry start in the store It's all about teaching kids; elementary should have a 30 minute class on healthy living, instead of focusing all body parts and functions..kids now a days learn that from the unfiltered Internet, Games, and Television.
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Old 05-18-2017, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,789 posts, read 10,211,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Middletwin View Post
Those countries that you mentioned have communities where people walk for commerce. (Here in the States, neighborhood bars are rare, so instead of walking, people drink and drive.)

Walking is exercise, by the way, so it makes no sense to go work out in a gym. Research, not the lazy google kind...does show where grain fed people store excess fat.

With all the caps in your post, it looks pretty aggressive.
Aggression has nothing to do with it. I found your post incredulous. Please show me all of the research that specifically shows that people who have a grain based diet (who also aren't consuming excess calories) store fat in the places you've mentioned. Though there's a "study" for everything..I'll agree on genetics and exercise but type of diet? Uh no.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
I've never had problems with salt either. In fact, I was concerned I wasn't getting enough iodine because I don't salt anything but eggs. I'm eating more seafood now to try to make sure I get enough.

I agree with you about everyone having different metabolisms. According to one of your articles, your BMR gets 1-2% slower each year after a certain age. So no wonder those of us who are older have a harder time staying at a healthy weight! What is 2% x 30 years? Add in the menopause slow down, which one doctor described as your body changing to support just one life instead of being able to support two (mom and baby). Fun stuff.

Then add in various prescriptions, surgeries, injuries, lifestyle requirements that each individual person deals with as they age. And then, like Mikala says, you have the genetic tendencies that some people fight their whole lives, no matter how much exercise some get, their weights skew on the heavy side.

No need to mock each other's choices on how they fight their own battles. It's not one size fits all or we'd all be thin and healthy.
Ok, as I told love hound before, my post had nothing to do with all of that stuff... So I'm not sure why people are going on a tangent here. I'm painfully aware about metabolism and aging. I'm forty one after all. I've been through it and still have to fight through it. I didn't mock anyone or their choices, so if you feel that way I'm not sure what to say.

Last edited by riaelise; 05-18-2017 at 08:20 AM..
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY
35,648 posts, read 10,553,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscoe Conkling View Post
I counted 42 different high-sugar breakfast cereals at my local Wal-Mart today. 42 !
The least-busiest aisle was produce and the biggest queue was at the pre-cooked lunch counter.
The 300lbs lady in front of me at the check-out was so fat she was in a motorized wheelchair provided by the store to help her shop because walking was too much of a strain.
She had her son with her who I would say was about 14-years-old and he must have weighed 200lbs.
Her final bill came to $96 dollars - there wasn't a single piece of vegetable or fruit among what she'd bought and virtually everything was food which didn't need any preparation other than opening a packet.
I guestimated 75% of the people in the store were obese.
There just doesn't seem to be a lot of shame about being fat in America these days.

I see the same thing at Wegmans, and it's not uncommon to see moms tell their kids to "pick out something for dinner." Many people are eating too much of the wrong things, and they're the same people who don't care to move around the kitchen.

Since time immemorial, one pound has required 3500 calories. We simply don't need as many calories as our ancestors did.
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:31 AM
 
844 posts, read 303,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Aggression has nothing to do with it. I found your post incredulous. Please show me all of the research that specifically shows that people who have a grain based diet (who also aren't consuming excess calories) store fat in the places you've mentioned. Though there's a "study" for everything..



Ok, as I told love hound before, my post had nothing to do with all of that stuff... So I'm not sure why people are going on a tangent here. I'm fully aware about metabolism and aging. I'm forty one after all. I've been through it and still have to fight through it. I didn't mock anyone or their choices, so if you feel that way I'm not sure what to say.
That research is stored away for now, but like you said, there is a "Study" for everything. Glad you found something that works for you - life is fluid so in nine years, needs may change. We know that people with low estrogen eating grains get large mid-sections and for men it's sooner than women who get it later after menopause exacerbated by cortisol caused from not limiting sugar, unchecked stress and too much exercise.
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:41 AM
 
3,921 posts, read 2,759,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post

Ok, as I told love hound before, my post had nothing to do with all of that stuff... So I'm not sure why people are going on a tangent here. I'm painfully aware about metabolism and aging. I'm forty one after all. I've been through it and still have to fight through it. I didn't mock anyone or their choices, so if you feel that way I'm not sure what to say.
Sorry if I was confusing, I was replying to Lovehound's post and articles.

And 41 is young!
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:38 AM
 
202 posts, read 78,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Middletwin View Post
Yep, we should learn from them: eat grain be "more ACTIVE and eat a balanced diet". Agree, genetics plays a part where one holds their weight. However, one who eats excess grain will have the front butt and / or middle tire. If they do too many carbs, their necks are flabby and fat, too. This is the reality of food choices but as you say, all preventable unless they are more ACTIVE, otherwise grain is their demon.
No, it is your bodily systems that decide where to stores excess weight, and by that I presume you mean fat. Fat is stored in adipose tissue. Such tissues are present in various areas in your body, and your hormones decide where to store the energy. Women have different hormones so there is a gender difference in where excess fat is stored. Hormonal systems change with age so where you develop fat changes with age too.

This is opposed to muscle tissue where for the most part your lifestyle and exercise determine where such tissue is located, or more to the point, which muscles add tissue as you exercise
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:48 AM
 
202 posts, read 78,024 times
Reputation: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
I thought the spare tire during menopause was caused by hormones, not genetics?
Both. Your genetics are responsible for your body type, and genetics is the biggest factor governing your hormonal systems.

This is why men and women gain weight in different areas, particularly in later life when metabolisms slow down and energy previously burned gets stored instead.

You may just simply have a body type that prefers "spare tire" storage. I'm of the impression that men tend to store extra fat in their abdominal area (belly) while women tend to store extra fat in their hips and gluteus.

I'm also concerned that there are patterns in both genders that are indicative as symptoms of possible diseases to come. (But I know nothing about it beyond hearing it.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Yes, though it also depends on genetics - where weight tends to fall. Also things like childbearing can have an effect as well. Sometimes it doesn't matter how much you exercise, the weight is gonna fall where it's gonna fall. My waist at 26 years old was 26 inches. I'm 28 inches now at 41. Oh well.

*Vigorous* exercise burns fat and that is always a good thing.
I can't believe how many posts have been made since my last appearance yesterday! Thus the duplication of my replies providing answers to questions already answered. Very popular topic!

Yes of course childbearing can be a factor. It is a serious upheaval of your hormone system and can (probably does) cause permanent effects.

I might slightly disagree with the use of the word "vigorous." I suspect that the total amount of work is the main criterion, although there is also the difference between aerobic and anaerobic, perhaps a subject for a future post.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tarasassymb View Post
I agree that laziness is a big part of it. And parents don't want to hurt their kids' feelings so they let them do what they want.
Craziness if you ask me. But also lack of education on how easy and how much cheaper it actually is to cook your meals at home. But in a society that "wants it now" the local fast food is often where people head. Haha, try staying away from there for awhile and then go back even once. The food is actually quite nasty!
Maybe pick a fast food restaurant way across the city and walk over and back?

I too have pointed out that it is often less expensively to eat wholesome food cooked at home rather than eat convenience food. There is the additional labor of cooking, but I like cooking so that is no obstacle for me!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
I've found another article in which the author proposes answers or at least solutions for some of the problems we've discussed, particularly plateaus:

Can You Really Change Your Metabolism?

I don't agree with the entire article but I think it's worth reading. People are different. Maybe my answer isn't there; maybe yours is.
Your article has given me much food for thought! I still support the idea that men can add muscle tissue as an aid to increased physical fitness, more than women. But the author may be right that the effect may be overly touted. Maybe it really is mostly just calories in and calories out.


Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Well I can tell you that I always get cottonmouth and water retention due to excessive sodium, not an uncommon occurrence. Actually my point had nothing to do with people's metabolism or calories in, calories out. I simply mentioned the excessive sodium in restaurant food, that's all.
That is the textbook case! You will gain water as the result of salt consumption because as your blood salt level rises there is a homeostatic mechanism that causes you to thirst for more water. The high salt is eventually corrected by increased excretion of salt into urine and is expelled from the body. In the mean time you may also experience transient hypertension.

In fact hydrochlorothiazide is a major anti-hypertensive prescription which stimulates the mechanism of excreting excess salt by increased urine production. This reduces blood volume and removes salt resulting in less swelling.

Also note, drinking plenty of water is recommended for all people irrespective of their health situation. Your kidneys work more efficiently when there is more water transport through them, and also find it easier to pump undesirable substances from the blood into the urine due to the greater concentration difference. In other words it is more difficult for your kidneys to pump excretory products into a concentrated solution than into a less concentrated solution. It is every person's easy way to increase kidney function!


Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
Sorry, I was serious, I've never felt bad after eating at a restaurant. I was trying to get at what specifically you were ordering to cause this.

I've never had an issue with sodium.
Same here but I don't always finish the portions they serve. In fact due to my size I must order less and even then cannot always finish the servings.

If you are in good health and have a reasonable blood pressure then you should have no particular concern about salt. Just keep track of your blood pressure as you age.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
I've never had problems with salt either. In fact, I was concerned I wasn't getting enough iodine because I don't salt anything but eggs. I'm eating more seafood now to try to make sure I get enough.

I agree with you about everyone having different metabolisms. According to one of your articles, your BMR gets 1-2% slower each year after a certain age. So no wonder those of us who are older have a harder time staying at a healthy weight! What is 2% x 30 years? Add in the menopause slow down, which one doctor described as your body changing to support just one life instead of being able to support two (mom and baby). Fun stuff.

Then add in various prescriptions, surgeries, injuries, lifestyle requirements that each individual person deals with as they age. And then, like Mikala says, you have the genetic tendencies that some people fight their whole lives, no matter how much exercise some get, their weights skew on the heavy side.

No need to mock each other's choices on how they fight their own battles. It's not one size fits all or we'd all be thin and healthy.
Good post!

Just noting, iodine was originally added to salt to counter poor diets. If you eat a good diet of fresh, whole foods in good nutritional proportion you don't really need the iodine supplement in iodized salt. Myself, I use solely sea salt, which probably has iodine. I don't pay any attention.

In some sense one size does fit all, but of course not in the sense you meant it. Most of us would be in good physical condition if we combined eating a healthful diet in proper proportions with a reasonable amount of exercise. That works for most people if only they will follow it, excluding people with unusual problems, illnesses or genetic conditions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
I see the same thing at Wegmans, and it's not uncommon to see moms tell their kids to "pick out something for dinner." Many people are eating too much of the wrong things, and they're the same people who don't care to move around the kitchen.
That's crazy! It's like giving the cell keys to the inmates of the prison!

One can only conclude that these are careless parents who don't give a damn about their children, or are too ill informed to understand the importance of nutrition, particularly to children in their formative years. These are years when they may develop lifelong nutritional habits. It is up to every parent to educate their children about such things as good health, since I see the subject as little taught in grade school.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
Since time immemorial, one pound has required 3500 calories. We simply don't need as many calories as our ancestors did.
You have brought up an interesting point: our adipose or fatty tissue energy storage system is an evolutionary trait from prehistoric times when early man always encountered feast followed by famine. Adipose tissues stored sufficient energy to bridge the gaps between times of feast.

A very interesting example of this is in the metabolisms characteristic of Native Americans. They got along fine before the colonization by Europeans and the more nutritious foods that the conquers brought with them, including European crops introduced to the New World. That caused an explosion of obesity problems among Native Americans that is evident even today, if not even endemic! Native Americans had been isolated from European evolution for as long as 20,000 years (since their journey over the Bering straits) and had become accustomed to lean diets. Upon encountering Europeans the Native Americans began experiencing obesity and all the other related problems including diabetes. This continues to be a problem today because the Native Americans still have their differing metabolic systems. Their problems are caused by adopting modern diets that their bodies cannot handle.

Last edited by per se; 05-18-2017 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 05-19-2017, 09:26 PM
 
380 posts, read 228,237 times
Reputation: 1001
Sugar and chemicals in food are addicting; people are addicted. Simple
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