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Old 06-10-2010, 09:03 PM
 
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The pup caught a toad or frog tonight on the deck. I didn't get a good look at it, but it was a high jumper and really did its best to escape, and jumped into the yard. After 2 hours, I believe the dog has done it in.

When I lived in Florida, I knew that the frogs there were toxic, but I don't know about NC. The dog seems fine (other than whining and wanting to go out to find it again), no foaming at the mouth or anything. She was carrying it around for a long time.

Does anyone know if NC toads/frogs are also toxic like the Florida ones?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 06-10-2010, 09:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by didee View Post
The pup caught a toad or frog tonight on the deck. I didn't get a good look at it, but it was a high jumper and really did its best to escape, and jumped into the yard. After 2 hours, I believe the dog has done it in.

When I lived in Florida, I knew that the frogs there were toxic, but I don't know about NC. The dog seems fine (other than whining and wanting to go out to find it again), no foaming at the mouth or anything. She was carrying it around for a long time.

Does anyone know if NC toads/frogs are also toxic like the Florida ones?

Thanks in advance.
When I lived in the country my rottie used to carry the toads around. I do know they taste bad because he would spit them out and then pick them up again, over and over. I think we read it was toads way of defense, they put out a bad taste so they wouldnt get eaten. As far as being toxic, I am not sure, but he was always fine.
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Old 06-11-2010, 03:00 AM
 
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I think so - we had a dog stumbling and drooling and had to go to the ER vet once and we throught it was a toad. He recovered in about a day. That was the only thing that had changed and he was bad to chase little critters.

NC/SC state line just south of Charlotte.
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Old 06-11-2010, 07:00 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
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yes there is the buffo frog and it is toxic and resides everywhere in the lower 48 and especially prevelant in fla , texas and louisianna . Im sure they are in n carolina but dont know how prevalent they are there . either way I would be careful cause their toxin can kill . Im glad your dog was okay .
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Old 06-11-2010, 07:03 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
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Wednesday, February 08 2006 @ 08:15 PM EST
Contributed by: Don Winner
Views: 15,400

The practice of “toad-licking” has evolved into an urban legend – that the venom secreted through the skin of some toads cause hallucinations. In fact, the venom has been cultivated for generations to be used for medicinal purposes in human beings. However, the venom is highly toxic to pets. Dogs, which are the most likely pet to come into contact with a toad, have a high probability of dying if untreated. This toad wouldn’t win any awards for beauty; its brown/green skin is usually covered with warts. They grow to be about three to seven inches long, and is very toxic to pets. Because dogs are more curious and extroverted, they tend to be treated for toad poisoning more often. But a dog doesn’t necessarily have to lick or eat a toad to be poisoned. There have been cases where frogs have been attracted to a dog’s water dish and sat along the rim. Enough toxin can be left to make a dog sick.

(http://www.panama-guide.com/index.ph...animals&page=5

http://cars.er.usgs.gov/herps/Frogs_and_Toads/B_marinus/b_marinus.html

Meet Mr. and Mrs. Giant Toad

The Giant Toad (a.k.a. Marine Toad or Cane Toad) is the largest of the Florida frogs and toads. When this non-native species is threatened, it secretes a highly toxic milky substance from its large parotoid glands in the back of its head. This secretion will burn eyes, may inflame the skin, and can kill cats and dogs if they ingest it.

Originally released in sugar cane fields to help control rats and mice, it now is commonly found in South Florida yards. It breeds year round in standing water, streams, canals and ditches. The call is a low-pitched trill which sounds like an idling diesel engine.

Known scientifically as Bufo marinus, the Cane Toad, Giant Toad, or Marine Toad is native to an area extending from Mexico and Central America to the Amazon Basin.

Florida's first Giant Toad population was established in 1955 by an accidental release at Miami International Airport. Specimens imported by a pet dealer escaped and spread through canals to other areas. Pet dealers deliberately released the toad elsewhere in southeastern Florida in the early 1960s.

Last edited by Keeper; 06-11-2010 at 04:24 PM.. Reason: info was copyrighted. Post a snippet and a link
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Old 06-11-2010, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
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If it's a frog, you probably don't have a problem. Frogs are good to eat.

Toads are venomous and if a dog or cat bites a toad hard in the wrong place it can have a serious problem. The ideal situation is that a dog gently mouths a toad and has a very unpleasant but not serious experience, he'll learn better than you can teach him that way.
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Old 06-11-2010, 11:00 AM
 
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Thanks all for the info. She carried it around in her mouth for a long time last night. There was no way I could catch her. She is completely fine though, thank God. I have seen more toads this year than in the past. My dog is has a very high prey drive and there's no recalling her when she spots a critter (sigh). I'm not sure how I will protect her from toads, but at least I know now what to watch for.
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Old 06-11-2010, 11:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by didee View Post
Thanks all for the info. She carried it around in her mouth for a long time last night. There was no way I could catch her. She is completely fine though, thank God. I have seen more toads this year than in the past. My dog is has a very high prey drive and there's no recalling her when she spots a critter (sigh). I'm not sure how I will protect her from toads, but at least I know now what to watch for.
You can keep a dog with very high prey from chasing a critter and you can make them drop them when they get them. You just have to be a bit harsh. No need to sigh.
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Old 06-11-2010, 04:31 PM
 
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The link Phonelady provided has pictures of the toads. I lived in Panama and our dog would go after them and foam and drool if he touched them. They also would leave calling cards in our garage. They are 'big' not small and they are ugly. We did have them in FL at one house on a lake but not the other houses.
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Old 06-11-2010, 07:08 PM
 
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The Fowlers Toad in this link is the one I usually see a LOT of
Frogs and Toads of North Carolina
http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.ed...o_fowleri.html

I am now in Greenville SC but before I lived just south of Charlotte NC in Fort Mill.
When I say a lot, I mean like it is hard to go for a walk after dark because you are scared of stepping on them.
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