U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-25-2010, 10:48 AM
 
13,773 posts, read 33,909,853 times
Reputation: 10561

Advertisements

Why is that? I have a 90 lb weim and a 5 lb yorkie. I saw this on several rescues and wondered why they would make this a requirement. I understand no small kids. I have a 30 lb JRT who is a great fly catcher but wouldn't hurt another dog. He is a big baby.

BTW it was a Yorkie mix and another one was a chi-yorkie..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-25-2010, 10:59 AM
 
6,475 posts, read 9,929,370 times
Reputation: 10919
Was that a general rule with the organization, or a rule for that particular dog?

I once fostered an 18 lb dog that would go berserk over larger dogs. She could NOT go to a home with a larger dog. She'd just freak out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 12:12 PM
 
7,422 posts, read 13,715,230 times
Reputation: 4944
yeah if it's an issue with that specific dog, it makes sense.

but if they just won't adopt small dogs to homes with dogs over a certain size, that seems pretty unreasonable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 02:11 PM
 
7,980 posts, read 11,661,322 times
Reputation: 10473
I saw a woman years ago on a talk show who had written a book of some sort about big dogs killing small dogs. She was a Pappillion owner who showed. Apparently this happens even at shows - one of her examples was a Chihuahua that had been killed by a Sighthound at a show.
My sister's husband got a German Shephard who was amazing beautiful, amazing smart and totally untrained (it was such a waste, that dog had so much potential). They lived on country property and he was allowed to kill varmints and had a well developed prey drive. He eventually killed her cat (when it was outside). She watched for any indications of issues with her doxie. Perhaps because he was first, or didn't move fast enough to trigger, or perhaps the doxie just had moxie there was never a problem.
My point is small dogs sometimes trigger prey drive in big dogs. When your adopting to people you don't know its better to be cautious. The dogs safety is your responsibility, not the potential owners feelings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
4,033 posts, read 8,596,970 times
Reputation: 4912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
I saw a woman years ago on a talk show who had written a book of some sort about big dogs killing small dogs. She was a Pappillion owner who showed. Apparently this happens even at shows - one of her examples was a Chihuahua that had been killed by a Sighthound at a show.
My sister's husband got a German Shephard who was amazing beautiful, amazing smart and totally untrained (it was such a waste, that dog had so much potential). They lived on country property and he was allowed to kill varmints and had a well developed prey drive. He eventually killed her cat (when it was outside). She watched for any indications of issues with her doxie. Perhaps because he was first, or didn't move fast enough to trigger, or perhaps the doxie just had moxie there was never a problem.
My point is small dogs sometimes trigger prey drive in big dogs. When your adopting to people you don't know its better to be cautious. The dogs safety is your responsibility, not the potential owners feelings.
You make some very good points. However, I think that, if the shelter is, indeed, doing this to protect small[er] dogs, they are going overboard. After all, one could make the same argument re: cats (i.e. that they should not be adopted out to homes with large dogs). Moreover, high prey drive is not exclusive to large dogs; any small dog could just as easily kill another, if it really wanted to. Furthermore, if cats and small dogs are killed by a large dog, it is not necessarily b/c the dog is large. As you pointed out, it has more to do with an irresponsible owner than the size of the dog. In fact, I bet you anything that if your DS and BIL had gotten a JRT and allowed it to kill vermin, it would have gotten the cat as well.

Much as I like the idea of shelters ensuring that their charges go to responsible homes, they do not need to add to the fear and discrimination to which large dogs (and their owners) are already subject. My cat (as well as many other kits of this forum) has a great home b/c our local shelter didn't discriminate against my GSD and me, and I can't imagine if they had not allowed me to adopt

I think that this is a great example of how important and useful dog references can be. Furthermore, it would be a great idea if shelters required annual check-ins to make sure that adopted animals were well-placed (I know I would relish the chance to send pics or bring my furbutt to the shelter so that they could see how she's blossomed ). Adopters who haven't cared for the animals they've adopted should be subjected to penalties and place on a "no-adopt" list. I think that would be a much better system than breed or size discrimination.

Won't adopt to anyone with a dog over 20 lbs..-002.jpg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,169,813 times
Reputation: 7598
My Bichon doesn't like dogs that are too big because he gets frustrated that he can't hump them and nips at their shins.

By Boxer is fixed and he humps other dogs too.

The Bichon doesn't mind my boxer and my Mastiff because he humps them while they are taking naps.

He just doesn't like new big dogs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2010, 03:25 PM
 
Location: San Diego
5,027 posts, read 13,415,221 times
Reputation: 4849
Prey drive aside, accidents do happen. My friend has 3 dogs...a dachshund, a Wheaten Terrier and a black Lab. When the dachshund was 4 months old, the Lab played a little too rough and broke the puppy's rib cage. The vets recommended euthanizing, since there was a ton of damage and the puppy was in pain. She refused, and they did surgery instead. Cost $6,000 but the dog is alive and well today at almost 2. Doesn't have to be a dog with a prey drive, some dogs can accidentally hurt a much smaller dog, as my friend found out the very hard way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2010, 02:35 AM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,561,639 times
Reputation: 20505
Twice I've had larger female dogs attack smaller dogs in my house, and only smaller dogs. And I don't mean toy dogs, I mean mutts of about 30-some pounds (the females being about 55 pounds).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2010, 04:10 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,355 posts, read 16,839,068 times
Reputation: 11463
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
You make some very good points. However, I think that, if the shelter is, indeed, doing this to protect small[er] dogs, they are going overboard. After all, one could make the same argument re: cats (i.e. that they should not be adopted out to homes with large dogs). Moreover, high prey drive is not exclusive to large dogs; any small dog could just as easily kill another, if it really wanted to. Furthermore, if cats and small dogs are killed by a large dog, it is not necessarily b/c the dog is large. As you pointed out, it has more to do with an irresponsible owner than the size of the dog. In fact, I bet you anything that if your DS and BIL had gotten a JRT and allowed it to kill vermin, it would have gotten the cat as well.

Much as I like the idea of shelters ensuring that their charges go to responsible homes, they do not need to add to the fear and discrimination to which large dogs (and their owners) are already subject. My cat (as well as many other kits of this forum) has a great home b/c our local shelter didn't discriminate against my GSD and me, and I can't imagine if they had not allowed me to adopt

I think that this is a great example of how important and useful dog references can be. Furthermore, it would be a great idea if shelters required annual check-ins to make sure that adopted animals were well-placed (I know I would relish the chance to send pics or bring my furbutt to the shelter so that they could see how she's blossomed ). Adopters who haven't cared for the animals they've adopted should be subjected to penalties and place on a "no-adopt" list. I think that would be a much better system than breed or size discrimination.

Attachment 65855
i just LOVE that picture.......

Quote:
Originally Posted by MAK802 View Post
Prey drive aside, accidents do happen. My friend has 3 dogs...a dachshund, a Wheaten Terrier and a black Lab. When the dachshund was 4 months old, the Lab played a little too rough and broke the puppy's rib cage. The vets recommended euthanizing, since there was a ton of damage and the puppy was in pain. She refused, and they did surgery instead. Cost $6,000 but the dog is alive and well today at almost 2. Doesn't have to be a dog with a prey drive, some dogs can accidentally hurt a much smaller dog, as my friend found out the very hard way.
that would be my concern as well ..... i am sure there are successful homes with dogs of wildly divergent sizes..... but i myself would not want to take that chance...... a big dog can send a little dog spinning and tumbling just playing a little too rough .....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2010, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,244 posts, read 14,023,883 times
Reputation: 6063
I've got 26 dogs in the house. Puppies to geriatrics. Chihuahuas to 100+ pound dogs, including pitbulls, GSDs, labs, etc.

We have our days. One dog will be grumpy about something and they'll have their tantrums. But we've never had any fight that's every had a dog injured, let alone killed. It's usually a very quick growl and nip - a warning to the other dog to leave them alone - but nothing more.

Having a home full of dogs of different ages and sizes doesn't mean something will wind up dead, anymore than having a dog and cat will result in a dead cat. As a matter of fact we've got 2 litters of kittens that our dog is nursing (we supplement feed) that are 1 and 2 weeks old. The dogs ignore them.

It's all in how well you are able to control your pack and how much experience you have. If I were no longer doing rescue and tried to adopt a small breed dog and had a single large breed in my house and was told I wasn't allowed, I'd be big time ticked. I know they do what they can to keep the dogs safe, but making blanket rules is stupid in any case.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top