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Old 12-29-2010, 04:12 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Florida
1,439 posts, read 2,481,337 times
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Dashdog...we all know your Dazzle is a special boy. He is just too pretty to get a hair out of place over something as silly as someone trying to enter your home uninvited...lol.
As for Bostons...nah, my mom couldn't keep up with those wacky little munchkins lol.
I just heard that her next door neighbors dog, a very large Dogue de Bordeaux mix has been acting strange at night since the incident occured a couple of days ago.

Last edited by Col.W.Deering; 12-29-2010 at 04:15 PM.. Reason: her neighbors dog is not a terrier mix, but a dogue de bordeaux mix
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:06 PM
 
7,970 posts, read 11,614,637 times
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There are many rescue's out there that have mixed breeds. Why worry about the breed at all?
Figure out the qualities you want,
size, coat, age (I suggest older), activity level, barkiness, housetrained etc.
then call around to some rescues and ask if they have any dogs that have been in foster long enough to know their personalities and have these qualities?
That's probably the best way to get what's really suited to your needs. Dog breeds MAY have some generalized traits but really - all dogs are pretty individual regardless so for your Mother's purposes...who cares?
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:19 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Florida
1,439 posts, read 2,481,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
There are many rescue's out there that have mixed breeds. Why worry about the breed at all?
Figure out the qualities you want,
size, coat, age (I suggest older), activity level, barkiness, housetrained etc.
then call around to some rescues and ask if they have any dogs that have been in foster long enough to know their personalities and have these qualities?
That's probably the best way to get what's really suited to your needs. Dog breeds MAY have some generalized traits but really - all dogs are pretty individual regardless so for your Mother's purposes...who cares?

True true, excellent advice. But just for general purposes, I wondered what types of breeds may have a genetic lean towards being protective of their families. I also received excellent advice from the posters who said a small dog may be a trip hazzard to my mother. I had never thought about that, but its important.
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:30 PM
 
Location: On this planet most of the time
8,039 posts, read 3,956,236 times
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I agree with Giesla check with some rescue groups here in OK in fact I think in Tulsa there is a rescue group that handles rescues that were procured from homes of elderly people that have had to go into nursing homes or passed away. These dogs are house broken, trained and are familiar with being in a elderly persons home. I can't at the moment think of the group but perhaps there is a group in your area or any rescue group actually may be able to assist you with this.
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:39 PM
 
18,856 posts, read 31,604,866 times
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It is important though, that some breeds that are protective, require a strong master to keep them in "check". And that may not work for the OP's mother. Today I saw a beautiful bulldog mix, he looked liked a miniature Rottweiler! Cute! And he was just such a love...looked fierce, barked a bit when I drove up, then cuddled up to his Daddy on the sofa. He came over and gave my hand a few licks...probably checking out what I had for lunch. Older people get so much out of having a dog. I trained our dog Sam, and gave him to my Grandmother when he was perfectly trained, because she could not have managed training a dog. So, that may be an option for you, get a dog, do the work to make him the perfect dog for your Mom, and then, turn him over to her. Because training a dog can be a lot of work for an older person.
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Old 12-29-2010, 06:03 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,099,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
It is important though, that some breeds that are protective, require a strong master to keep them in "check". And that may not work for the OP's mother. Today I saw a beautiful bulldog mix, he looked liked a miniature Rottweiler! Cute! And he was just such a love...looked fierce, barked a bit when I drove up, then cuddled up to his Daddy on the sofa. He came over and gave my hand a few licks...probably checking out what I had for lunch. Older people get so much out of having a dog. I trained our dog Sam, and gave him to my Grandmother when he was perfectly trained, because she could not have managed training a dog. So, that may be an option for you, get a dog, do the work to make him the perfect dog for your Mom, and then, turn him over to her. Because training a dog can be a lot of work for an older person.
I believe a number of the breed rescues have programs they label "seniors for seniors" where they will match a senior dog with a senior human: a "win/win" situation for both.

Col., perhaps this community (or protective son) needs to let the neighborhood PD to be aware of the strange activity so that they can be aware and patrol through it at night and during the daytime randomly. hint, hint......
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Old 12-29-2010, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,357 posts, read 9,823,387 times
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We had a Norwegian Elkhound as our first dog right after we got married. She saved us from a break-in one night. We weren't living in the best part of town at the time. When we got up one morning, after she'd been barking her head off, we found the front door jimmied and standing wide open. But nothing was taken.

A medium size dog, with a ferocious demeanor if needed. Only problem is the coat--needs lots of brushing and does a big shed twice a year.

Ours was very tender with kids and let them crawl all over her, but she was a great defender of hearth and home.

350px-Norwegian-Elkhound Farm Safe VT
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Old 12-29-2010, 08:36 PM
 
214 posts, read 602,609 times
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Col, I am going to be the wet blanket at this party and suggest that it is a bad idea for an elderly woman to have a large, protective dog. First off, depending on her age and health, any dog can be a trip hazard. My friends elderly mother broke her hip tripping over the family's black lab while babysitting. Large dogs can easily knock an elderly person over while playing. Dogs with strong protective instincts need a LOT of training and socialization in order to not become a serious legal liability, and I have known several very competant, committed dog owners who have either had to rehome their dog, or spend a LOT of money on professional trainers when their "protective" dog would not let anyone in the house. I think anyone who owns a large breed dog has a responsibility to be able to physically control the dog at all times...I think most ethical breeders of high drive, protective, guardian breeds would not sell a dog to an elderly person for this purpose.

Also keep in mind that having a protective dog carries another risk; a local police office told me a story of a call he took where an elderly woman had fallen while walking her GSD, and broken her hip. When the ambulance arrived, the dog would not let anyone near her. Her hip was shattered, and she was in a lot of pain. When the police arrived, they were afraid they would have to shoot the dog. The woman ended up having to crawl over to the cruiser and push the dog up into the car, where they shut the door and trapped him so the EMTs could take her. If your mom has a medical emergency, remember that a large, aggressive dog may not let emergency personal in to help her.

That being said, I truly empathize with your worries about your mothers safety, as I have been in your shoes. I am also a big fan of small breed dogs as companions for the elderly, and agree that most small dogs can alert and bark a warning that will at least be a deterent. What about a panic button and a good alarm system, along with a small companion dog who can let her know if someone is in the yard? Make sure she has a cell phone, or at least cordless phone handsets in several rooms. You can get her a lifealert sytem that she can wear around her neck....its very, very simple, and can be useful for medical and any other emergency. MY MIL had one, and it gave us real peace of mind.

I just think a large, aggressive dog could create more problems for your mother than it would solve.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Cedar Park/NW Austin
1,308 posts, read 2,654,927 times
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I think Hepcat gives very sound advice. A good alarm system is likely to cost your mother less annually than a dog will. My large lab/rottie mix costs about $45 a month to feed, $10 to deflea, $8 to guard against heartworms, and $10 to keep vaccinated (~$120 once a year), and that's not covering all the other random things I buy him. He's sweet, looks imposing, and noisy when needed, but more cost effective than an alarm system? No.

A smaller companion animal that is capable of barking at strange noises would likely be a better fit if she even wants one.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:33 AM
 
246 posts, read 225,292 times
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I currently own 2 collies who are not much at protection and I think if someone broke in they would lick them to death.
I had a lab mix who scared everyone and had a ferocious bark. She would have never hurt anyone but her size and bark were enough for us.
Good luck and I would look at the pound first
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