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Old 04-25-2011, 12:28 PM
 
13 posts, read 49,743 times
Reputation: 39

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
It wasn't a judgement, it was a response to the information you provided in your original post.

.

Good luck in re-homing your dog.
Modifying our behaviour doesn't solve the problem. The problem is still there, we're just walking on eggshells and not behaving naturally ourselves just to keep the dog more relaxed. That isn't a solution, it's a bandaid. I didn't say we don't do these things, I just said that it's not an actual solution, and it doesn't make the dog trustworthy.
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Old 04-25-2011, 12:33 PM
 
13 posts, read 49,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirl View Post
"My dog attacked me and now I am pregnant" sounds like you are going to give birth to a very weird mammal.

But, to be serious, I think you need to have this dog pts. I am a dog lover and a volunteer with a couple of rescue groups. My last 3 dogs have been adopted from rescue, too. A couple of years ago I had my 8 year old soul dog euthanized because he did an unprovoked attack (there had been a few) again. We had many plans for managing his sporatic aggression but none were fail safe, obviously. In the end, I decided I could not risk a dog biting my grandchild's face or hurting another stranger. At the age of the dog, chances were slim to none he would be adopted. Sending a dog to a shelter is unfair to both dog and future owner. Having a dog euthanized at the shelter -- unless you are allowed to hold him during the injection -- is cruel, too. I took my boy to our vet and held him in my arms while he was injected....and I gave him a lovely steak dinner before we went.
Thanks for your thoughts on this.

We had to put our 19 year old cat to sleep a few years ago, and the idea of having to do this with our dog just breaks my heart. I can't leave her at a shelter. We got her from a shelter, and having seen her in that environment... I can't put her back there. I can't tell you how devastated I am right now.
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Old 04-25-2011, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 33,359,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennysnooze View Post
We adopted our dog 7 years ago. She was 11 months old at the time, and was fear aggressive, poorly socialized, and most likely abused. We've worked with her over the years, have taken her to trainers who deal with fear aggression, and she has gotten better, but is still a bit of a wild card. She is anxious around anyone by my husband and myself -- even when with people she knows and is excited to see, she still never quite relaxes. That said, she has never bitten anyone before, though she has snapped at the air when frightened.

Over the weekend my brother was visiting from out of town. We were all sitting outside and our neighbours were out in their yards as well. I was sitting next to the dog with my hand loosely holding her collar, when out of the blue she attacked me. There was no warning, and she needed to be pulled off me. She snapped at my hands and forearms and I have a nasty bruise and a scraped up finger.

We immediately isolated her, leaving her in the garage for 7 or 8 hours. Since bringing her back into the house she is told to spend most of the time lying on her dog bed.

I'm pregnant and due with our first child in September. I honestly feel like dog trainers have told us how to modify our behaviour but have done nothing to actually "solve" the problems with the dog. My husband wants to find a new trainer to work with, but I am doubtful I will ever trust our dog again, certainly not around the baby when it's born.

What would you do? Does anyone think training could work, or do we need to look to rehouse or euthanize her? I have cried for hours over this and am not taking our any decisions lightly. I love our dog. I don't know that I'll ever be able to trust her again.
I don't hink that there is any shame in removing from you home what you perceive to be an unacceptable risk to your child. Yes, you are the dog's steward and, yes, you are responsible to it - but your dog is one thing and your baby is another.
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Old 04-25-2011, 12:45 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,662,112 times
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You should definitely find a new home for the dog. Dogs can't be isolated in a garage for 8 hours and then told to do nothing but sit on a dog bed all day. That's not taking care of a dog. It's encouraging boredom, which leads to frustration and aggression. Dogs need exercise, they need a job. It makes me wonder if that's what you were instructed to do whenever the dog acts up...and if you were ever taught how to _prevent_ him from acting up in the first place.
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Old 04-25-2011, 12:47 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,330 posts, read 12,565,592 times
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This must be heartbreaking. Whether or not there was a logical explanation, like catching a claw, you can't have a dog like that in a home with a child. You could try conacting various rescues that might have foster homes available, where she might be able to get more training, but if not I'm afraid I would have to say she needs to be pts. I'm so sorry for you and her.
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Old 04-25-2011, 12:53 PM
 
13 posts, read 49,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
You should definitely find a new home for the dog. Dogs can't be isolated in a garage for 8 hours and then told to do nothing but sit on a dog bed all day. That's not taking care of a dog. It's encouraging boredom, which leads to frustration and aggression. Dogs need exercise, they need a job. It makes me wonder if that's what you were instructed to do whenever the dog acts up...and if you were ever taught how to _prevent_ him from acting up in the first place.
She is still getting her walks, etc. and has only been told to spend most of her time in her bed over the past 24 hours. We were taught that the worst punishment for a dog is isolation from the pack, which is what we did immediately following the incident. Since isolating her in the garage she has been acting appropriately subordinate, so I'd say that it worked. In the weeks since becoming pregnant, our dog had been challenging me at every turn. Since isolating her she actually does what she's told, when she's told. It works.

The dog is half whippet, and like a whippet, actually wants to spend much of the day in bed.
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Old 04-25-2011, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Findlay, OH
313 posts, read 1,033,126 times
Reputation: 176
Moderator cut: personal attack
Penny, you can't have a dog that could hurt you or your baby.... MO did give sound advice to see if a breed specific rescue would take your pup. And you've already expressed that you would give complete disclosure. So I think a rescue league would give a fair evaluation and if they deem the dog to not to be safe, then to euthanize would be the only option.

But most importantly, you and your family need to be safe... So sorry about your difficult decision and situation...

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 04-25-2011 at 02:26 PM..
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Old 04-25-2011, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,435 posts, read 41,675,230 times
Reputation: 47010
sorry you have been inappropriately addressed in this thread. You came looking for help and a few have been very unkind or stupid. Once trust is lost (with dog or person) it is hard to trust again but especially with a dog, it can be dangerous. I'm sorry. Your hormones may be trigerring these attacks and challenges. We know dogs are very sensitive to our moods and body changes. In any event, you know you need to make sure this dog is not around the child and probably not even you. Again my condolences.
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Old 04-25-2011, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,821 posts, read 39,409,007 times
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Personally, I didn't see anything in the OP that indicated that training has not been done or followed through on. When you adopt a dog, there is always the possibility that it will come with problems that may or may not be within your scope of ability to deal with. There seems to be a perception among some that all behavioral issues are fixable by all people in all situations, and that's not necessarily the case. It also seems to be the prevailing opinion that the adopter of a troubled dog needs to be able to work magic, which isn't necessarily realistic. Some animals are too damaged to be pets, and it's absolutely heartbreaking when you adopt one where this is the case. Not many people can or want to build their entire world around an adopted animal's special behavioral needs, especially if it means potentially endangering their own children (or themselves).

A dog with anxiety and demonstrated aggression issues that have persisted for years despite numerous training attempts over said years does not sound like a good candidate to be in a home with an infant/new parents. Attempts to make a dog owner who has been taking the responsible steps in dealing with dangerous behavioral issues feel badly are misguided, IMO. This dog may not need to be euthanized. I don't know. But it definitely doesn't need to be in a home with a pregnant woman or an infant, given the behavior that's been exhibited. Another home more equipped to deal with these issues would be ideal, but whether or not that's available/possible is another matter.
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Old 04-25-2011, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,300 posts, read 2,981,233 times
Reputation: 1218
I had a very similar problem with my dog, Charlie. He attacked my fiance and it was a severe attack. And then we put him in a training program and following his training he attacked and killed our kitten. He was 7 years old too and a mixed breed. We tried training and tried different training methods, in the end we had Charlie pts. It was the most difficult decision either of us had ever made. I am tearing up now just thinking about it. The vet is definitely the first step, they need to run bloodwork and do a thyroid panel to make sure there is nothing else going on. Our vet found nothing wrong with Charlie, but the vet advised me throughout the process. She said she thought Charlie had a brain tumor that was affecting his behavior. Apparently brain tumors are difficult to diagnose in dogs; they need an MRI and then if they find that it is a tumor there are really no treatment options except euthanasia. You basically know things will get worse if it's a tumor so euthanasia is the kind thing to do. I copied my thread below in case it helps you. Charlie was mostly german shepherd (we think) and I talked to people from different GSD rescues that had a lot of experience in rescue. For me I needed to exercise all the options before deciding on euthanizing. Reach out to people with experience with aggression like trainers, rescuers, other dog owners, your vet; talking about it will help you sort it out. Whatever you decide make sure you're comfortable with your decision and if it takes a little while to research and look into everything that's ok. I'm so sorry you're going through this.

Update: dog was euth'd; Charlie is aggressive...and we need to make a decision

Last edited by J-CityRelo; 04-25-2011 at 02:00 PM..
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