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Old 05-05-2011, 10:45 PM
 
Location: The Middle
5,154 posts, read 7,065,961 times
Reputation: 6357
Default Protecting dog from coyotes

My neighbor told me she saw two coyotes in her backyard last week. She thinks they were eyeing my 5 year old beagle. I am one of the very few homes that have a fenced yard. It is a 1/2 acre pie shaped lot with a chain link fence for the exception of the cattle style fencing that runs along the back of my property. Along the one side of my yard is about 20 pine trees that are full grown and dense. My neighbor that saw the coyotes lives behind me and the corner of her property meets mine where the pine trees are.

I am educating myself on coyotes since I am new to the area and never dealt with wildlife before. We have lots of rabbits, chipmunks and there is even a groundhog that comes up on my deck to peer in at me through the french doors. From what I read on line articles vary in how coyotes hunt. Some say as long as there is an ample supply of smaller critters they will leave dogs alone. Others says coyotes are opportunists and will go for a small dog if its available.

So here is my problem. The darn dog wants to go sniff over by the pine trees all the time, especially after dark. Now that I am aware of the coyotes I feel this is unsafe for her. So we have been taking her out on a leash during dawn and dusk hours as I have read this is the time frame coyotes do most of their hunting. But if my dog is on the leash she refuses to do her business. After a while we bring her back in and she messes in the house. I already have a slight problem with this as it is and now its getting worse. So I started taking her off the leash and just standing by her. This seemed to be working but tonight she saw something she liked over by the trees and was gone. She doesn't come when I call her and it spooks me to go back in that area with the trees.

When I found this house I was excited because the yard is awesome. It's huge and completely fenced but now I feel I can't leave the dog out there. Any suggestions?
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Old 05-05-2011, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
354 posts, read 531,833 times
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Well, there isn't any problem with your dog sniffing around getting scent of the coyote. It is a disaster if the dog gets loose and chases it or wanders off following its nose as it may become prey of a whole pack of coyotes and my impression of beagles is that they aren't too big and do not have a lot of fight in them.

Walk your dog on a leash if you can not control it, or keep up. I wouldn't worry at all if the dog is in the yard and coyotes come around. You can be out there pretty quick and they can't carry off a beagle much less jump a fence with one. Just secure the yard so if there is trouble you can come out and chase off the coyotes. A few bites will cure the dog of its curiosity and it will not be much the worse for it (make sure it is up to date on rabies shots). Then when it smells the coyotes it will come back in the house. Maybe you would consider getting a dog the coyotes might be curious about but would be happy to leave alone?

My dearly departed dog loved to chase and stalk coyotes and even "rescued" a number of dogs being harrassed by coyotes by charging in and running them off.

Coyotes are looking for an easy score and do not want to get torn up and injured, they are smart. I have seen a lot of them on morning walks I used to do with my dog. One time there was a couple she spotted and was going to have some sport with and they stalked each other and had a few chases. (The game was she would chase them and turn her back on them and they would stalk her and try to bite her in the ass.) When we moved on I saw one of them go back and pick up a rabbit it had stashed when it saw us coming.
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Old 05-05-2011, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
829 posts, read 1,025,142 times
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Coyotes are a nuisance and cause real problems for ranchers or other folks who have small livestock. I used to hunt them regularly when I lived in the country.

We had a Welsh Corgi who had no sense at all. She would charge after them when she spotted them. I always thought it would be her undoing, but that little dog was smarter than I gave her credit for.

See, she was fast. You wouldn't think a dog could run so fast on those stumpy little legs, but she was like a bullet. She just seemed to know instinctively that it was her job to drive them away or otherwise get rid of them. So, what she'd do is, charge em' and then get one to chase her. She'd lead it back to where my big Elkhound could get a piece of it..

Or, when she saw me pick up a rifle and electronic call, she would do the same thing, except she would keep it distracted long enough where I could get a good shot at it.

I miss that little dog....... Coyotes never did get her, but a mini van did.......
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Old 05-06-2011, 02:56 AM
 
Location: OCEAN BREEZES AND VIEWS SAN CLEMENTE
17,068 posts, read 6,811,134 times
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My Son lives in the Calif Boonies Desert and i mean boonies, in the Desert. He has alomost 3 acres the lot is fenced chain-link. Besides snakes, and all the slimy creatures, and some weird, creatures, they have cotoyes. This is what i have learned about coyotes, from where they have been living.

First of all, there is a scout, a one coyote that will come out and look for prey sort of speak. If the coyote has it's site on this prey, at night, 5 or 6 will come out together, as they have at his house. Sometimes before they come out on their hunt, you can hear them in the distance howling, and you know when you hear them howl, something is about to happen.
He has had many problems with coyotes, infact one was so big, it jumped his fence, this was on the weekend when he was home thank goodness. They had at that time i believe 4 dogs. The next day their little mutt was attacked.

Well one of the smalles muts, was attacked one day, and the stomach torn open and the dog looked dead, it was just terrible, had to take this poor dog to the vet, it made it, but went thru so much to get back to a normal state. The freaking coyote jumped the dang fence.

They have put devices to shock the coyotes should they now get close to the fence, bushes that will deter them. But the vet told them if you live in an area where coyotes are, animals really need to be protected. If a coyote wants bad enough in someone's property, they can do it, and they usually do in packs, they are fearse. It is a terrible noise to hear, when they caught prey you could tell, their howl was just awful, like babies screaming crying, it was a terrible thing when they caught an animal Whatever you can do to protect your animals, i would do it ASAP..
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Old 05-06-2011, 03:17 AM
 
837 posts, read 886,340 times
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The best solution is to just bring the dog inside between dusk and dawn. Even though coyotes could not carry your dog off, they could definitely do a great deal of damage, and possibly even kill your dog. Why take the risk?

And walking the dog on a leash is another good preventative, as is just avoiding walking when you hear coyotes in the area.
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Old 05-06-2011, 04:42 AM
 
4,691 posts, read 7,197,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingwater View Post
This seemed to be working but tonight she saw something she liked over by the trees and was gone. She doesn't come when I call her and it spooks me to go back in that area with the trees.

When I found this house I was excited because the yard is awesome. It's huge and completely fenced but now I feel I can't leave the dog out there. Any suggestions?
I am confused. You say it is completely fenced in, but then you say she "was gone". A half-acre is small, so I can't picture her disappearing, we have one heavily wooded acre and I can still see my dogs in the trees at dusk. If it is not completely fenced in you should do so, which should keep the coyotes out. But I would still stay near her when she is outdoors, I wouldn't just let her outside alone. Have you tried a long retractable leash? They go out over 20', and she might feel more comfortable about doing her business on such a long leash.

We have coyotes, but they have never bothered our pets. I enjoy watching them, and listening to them at night. Once when I was out with our puppy there was a coyote watching us from the trees, but he just ran off as we approached. Of course I had my puppy on a leash, I'm not that crazy. But my border collies always went out without a leash with no problems, although I always kept an eye on them. We have a lot of wildlife in the woods, I think the coyotes are well-fed, so we just let them be, while still keeping an eye on our pets outside.
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:25 AM
 
2,418 posts, read 2,958,832 times
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Not sure what your zoning is, but many donkeys dislike and are aggressive towards coyotes and provide indirect protection for domestic animals. Two of my friends keep miniature donkeys on their land for this reason. Donkeys have exceptional hearing, a keen nose and excellent vision. They use these senses to detect intruders. They bray, bare their teeth, chase, and attempt to kick and bite coyotes.
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Old 05-06-2011, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,497 posts, read 5,626,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kahskye View Post
Not sure what your zoning is, but many donkeys dislike and are aggressive towards coyotes and provide indirect protection for domestic animals. Two of my friends keep miniature donkeys on their land for this reason. Donkeys have exceptional hearing, a keen nose and excellent vision. They use these senses to detect intruders. They bray, bare their teeth, chase, and attempt to kick and bite coyotes.
This and or a mule. I live rural and we have a real coyote problem around here and several of my neighbors have 1000+ acre farms and they breed cattle. Instead of a a guardian dog they got mules to live with the herds. A mule will KILL stray dogs and coyotes that get into their territory. I used to have a pony mule as a pasture mate for my horse and I never had a problem with them or snakes as long as she was around. She was very very affectionate with "her" dogs (mine) but not with the ones running loose or the coyotes.

As a rural farmer I consider them a real problem and I have seen them in the daylight hours around here and hear them at night. Several of the neighbors have instituted the three S system to get the population down around here and do it about once a year.

If you have a fenced yard you can put coyote rollers on top:
Home
Not cheap but it will work.

Urban coyote's are becoming a dangerous problem
Urban Coyote Attacks On The Rise, Alarming Residents
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Old 05-06-2011, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal
12,133 posts, read 11,056,574 times
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I still walk with a little bit of fear...

Scary morning with something wilder than Artie
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Old 05-06-2011, 08:10 AM
 
24,022 posts, read 12,967,382 times
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Dogs dislike the smell of citronella and you may want to look into the candles or torches.
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