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Old 07-20-2011, 11:35 AM
 
5,703 posts, read 16,124,906 times
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Yes I am sure it is a pit bull. The dog is large and aside from my Collie, yes I thought he was huge since his width is double the size of my collie. Dang, thought it would be a funny story to share since I am not really a fan of the breed. Tough crowd.

OP good luck on your puppy. Sounds like you know how to handle dogs and so far seems like the pup is progressing nicely.
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Old 07-20-2011, 12:08 PM
 
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It has been my experience that females, regardless of their breed, tend to be smarter and therefore learn faster than males. Females also tend to be more vocal than males.
I personally think that is true for all species...!
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Old 07-20-2011, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 20,170,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingwater View Post
Yes I am sure it is a pit bull. The dog is large and aside from my Collie, yes I thought he was huge since his width is double the size of my collie. Dang, thought it would be a funny story to share since I am not really a fan of the breed. Tough crowd.

OP good luck on your puppy. Sounds like you know how to handle dogs and so far seems like the pup is progressing nicely.
I am sorry, but I did not find your story humorous at all. It demonstrated a complete lack of control by the dog owner and the media-induced hysteria by your friend's neighbors. I found the story to be yet another example of the ignorance of the breed, by both the owner and her neighbors.

All male dogs have big, square, blocky heads when compared to females of the same breed. Females have a triangular-shaped, narrower heads. You can also determine the sex of a bear in the same way, just by the shape of their head.
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Old 07-20-2011, 05:56 PM
 
2,873 posts, read 4,741,428 times
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Originally Posted by fallingwater View Post
Yes I am sure it is a pit bull. The dog is large and aside from my Collie, yes I thought he was huge since his width is double the size of my collie. Dang, thought it would be a funny story to share since I am not really a fan of the breed. Tough crowd.

OP good luck on your puppy. Sounds like you know how to handle dogs and so far seems like the pup is progressing nicely.

Well, I thought it was a cute story. Yes, the owner should have better control of his dog, but at least now you and the neighbors know to judge the individual, not the breed. This is how people learn- by meeting the real dogs behind the stereotypes. If all you're ever heard is horror stories and hype, meeting a real live goofball pitty is the best cure.

Goofy is a great way to describe many of the pits I've known- they're just big clowns. And, unfortunately, many breeders do breed for bigger size, even though it goes against the breed standard. Look through craig's list sometime, and you'll see a lot of ads for 'monster pits' from 'rare bloodlines' with 'rare color'- they're just badly bred dogs (though that isn't the dog's fault, and they can still be great pets).

I worked with a woman who bred pits for the big show rings. They didn't look like the more common pits from backyard breeders. They were smaller, but the heads were HUGE- it actually looked like the dog might just fall over from the weight of its own skull. I actually prefer the less 'typey' dogs who are more normally proportioned. But this is common with show dogs- a show German Shepherd and a working German Shepherd look absolutely nothing alike, and the show dog looks deformed in comparison.
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:51 PM
 
5,703 posts, read 16,124,906 times
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Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
I am sorry, but I did not find your story humorous at all. It demonstrated a complete lack of control by the dog owner and the media-induced hysteria by your friend's neighbors. I found the story to be yet another example of the ignorance of the breed, by both the owner and her neighbors.
The dog was a pup at the time. I think its pretty common for a pup to get loose every now and then. He was quite hyper during that phase. Honestly, I stay away from this forum quite a bit due to how touchy it gets in here. I have seen some of the most horrific advice on this forum at times and some serious self righteousness as well. Sorry you missed the point. I was fearful of the dog before meeting it and it was interesting to see how everyone else was as well. The dog taught us something. Not to judge a book by its cover so to speak. The dog is a sweetheart.
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:55 PM
 
5,703 posts, read 16,124,906 times
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Originally Posted by ParallelJJCat View Post
Well, I thought it was a cute story. Yes, the owner should have better control of his dog, but at least now you and the neighbors know to judge the individual, not the breed. This is how people learn- by meeting the real dogs behind the stereotypes. If all you're ever heard is horror stories and hype, meeting a real live goofball pitty is the best cure.

Goofy is a great way to describe many of the pits I've known- they're just big clowns. And, unfortunately, many breeders do breed for bigger size, even though it goes against the breed standard. Look through craig's list sometime, and you'll see a lot of ads for 'monster pits' from 'rare bloodlines' with 'rare color'- they're just badly bred dogs (though that isn't the dog's fault, and they can still be great pets).

I worked with a woman who bred pits for the big show rings. They didn't look like the more common pits from backyard breeders. They were smaller, but the heads were HUGE- it actually looked like the dog might just fall over from the weight of its own skull. I actually prefer the less 'typey' dogs who are more normally proportioned. But this is common with show dogs- a show German Shepherd and a working German Shepherd look absolutely nothing alike, and the show dog looks deformed in comparison.
The dog was a pup which I think during that phase mishaps happen. What you say about the breeding could be true. I do not know the man that bred this dog and well what you have described sounds like what is going on. The dog is huge. His head is huge and quite honestly, I dont find the dog particularly attractive because something seems off. He has a great temperament but knowing exactly what size a pit should be in terms of head, hips and so forth, I really don't know. Even with my experience with Bruce I still wouldn't get a pit. More for personal reasons and liability.

Glad you have a sense of humor.
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Old 07-21-2011, 12:19 AM
 
1,077 posts, read 2,677,997 times
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Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
Good post, and you are right of course. Any dog can be a potential threat to humans. Although the "ankle-biter" or "toy" dog breeds are not much of a concern to adults, they can still cause severe injuries among children.

The American Pit Bull Terrier is not that impressive as far as domesticated canines are concerned. The Rhodesian Ridgebacks are a good example, as are Akita Inus that were raised to hunt bear, among other critters, in Japan. Or any of the Mastiff breeds (some being trained as war dogs, others as guardians) are far more impressive (and more massive), and that much more potentially dangerous to humans, than the APBT.

It is a matter of physics. The bigger the dog, the bigger the head, the bigger the mouth, the stronger the bite.
There are stronger dogs, but how many Rhodesian Ridgebacks do you come across on a daily basis?
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Old 07-21-2011, 05:50 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,352 posts, read 16,768,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ParallelJJCat View Post
Well, I thought it was a cute story. Yes, the owner should have better control of his dog, but at least now you and the neighbors know to judge the individual, not the breed. This is how people learn- by meeting the real dogs behind the stereotypes. If all you're ever heard is horror stories and hype, meeting a real live goofball pitty is the best cure.

Goofy is a great way to describe many of the pits I've known- they're just big clowns. And, unfortunately, many breeders do breed for bigger size, even though it goes against the breed standard. Look through craig's list sometime, and you'll see a lot of ads for 'monster pits' from 'rare bloodlines' with 'rare color'- they're just badly bred dogs (though that isn't the dog's fault, and they can still be great pets).

I worked with a woman who bred pits for the big show rings. They didn't look like the more common pits from backyard breeders. They were smaller, but the heads were HUGE- it actually looked like the dog might just fall over from the weight of its own skull. I actually prefer the less 'typey' dogs who are more normally proportioned. But this is common with show dogs- a show German Shepherd and a working German Shepherd look absolutely nothing alike, and the show dog looks deformed in comparison.

yes, they do.......
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Old 07-21-2011, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 20,170,213 times
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Originally Posted by Everest209 View Post
There are stronger dogs, but how many Rhodesian Ridgebacks do you come across on a daily basis?
I know a few people in Alaska who own Rhodesian Ridgebacks. There is even a Rhodesian Ridgeback rescue in Alaska. I own a Boerboel, which resembles an American Pit Bull Terrier on steroids. He is at least twice the size of an APBT at 130 pounds. I will admit, however, that I have not seen many South African Mastiffs in Alaska.

As far as large and giant breeds in Alaska are concerned, you are more likely to encounter Giant Alaskan Malamutes, Great Pyrenees, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards, and English Mastiffs. The most common dog in Alaska, however, has to be the Alaskan Husky, which are not any bigger than APBTs.
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Old 07-21-2011, 09:23 AM
 
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I have a friend who has three Rhodesian Ridgebacks, and they are mellow dogs.
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