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Old 07-09-2011, 02:16 PM
 
5,210 posts, read 9,129,581 times
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I feel as though a weight has been lifted. Thank you!!

It's been so encouraging to read about everyone's personal experiences with Pits and Pit mixes. Thank you so much for sharing your stories! The more time I spend with our little girl the more I love her. I'm just going to relax and enjoy this sweetie. If a problem arises, we'll deal with it. But so far, she seems like the perfect little edition to our family. Everyone, including our Golden, is enjoying her. She appears to have a fair amount of retriever in her - likes to carry sticks around, loves to chew on her toys, has webbing between her toes, likes to eat. Her coat is short and light, white with some yellow in places. She has a faint stripe down her nose. She is smaller than a pure lab would be (roughly 7.5 pounds at 9 weeks) and her head/ears have a bit of a terrier shape to them, her face is very lab like. I'm guessing she'll be 35/40 pounds when full grown.

I'm going to look into some socialization/puppy classes for her. I'll get her enrolled as soon as her shots are completed. In the meantime, I'll get her around other people and some of the dogs that we know. I'll see if I can post some pics of her soon, too .

Last edited by springfieldva; 07-09-2011 at 02:27 PM..
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Old 07-09-2011, 04:31 PM
 
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My dogs have gone to dog parks all their lives... there is an occasional incident between dogs but it's rare. And like anything else.. you are more likely to hear of the few negative incidents. Going has helped one of my rescues really come out of her shell. I wouldnt go at the busiest hour though ( right after work 5-7pm) Ease them in , go in the morning or late evening when there is a smaller group of dogs. There's a great group of dogs that go to mine at 8:30 every morning.. all our dogs get along really well and have a blast together. If you go and you dont like the group of dogs, leave... try a different time but seriously dog parks are an excellent place for socialization, but DO NOT LEAVE your dog on the leash inside the park, it puts your dog at a big disadvantage and creates more issues. I've seen so many puppies brought to the park when old enough that just thrive. There's a ton of info on do's and don't at dog parks ... look them up and follow them. Most problems at dog parks have to do with owners trying to rein in their dogs instead of letting them have fun. Follow the rules of the park and you should be fine.
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Old 07-09-2011, 05:18 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 15,363,159 times
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I know....many people have only positive experiences and I definitely admit that, when everyone is responsible, the benefits outweigh the risks of dog parks.

Some of my unwillingness to go to dog parks is because (along with other breeds and mutts) I have owned a demonized breed for 26-plus years; Rottweilers. If there's any altercation, no matter whose fault, the demonized breeds (Rottweilers, pit bulls, some mastiffs) are going to be held accountable. I'm extremely careful not to put any of my dogs in a vulnerable position.

I also actively do rescue and foster; but the dogs in my care go to day care/classes/friends' houses/dog events/agility/trials....where I am pretty sure that everyone and their dogs are savvy and sociable. There is a sort of "unofficial" dog park - a park that allows off-leash dogs - not too far away. Early mornings there's a couple of people I sometimes meet up with and walk with while our dogs run on the trails. But if someone with an unknown dog shows up, I leash mine up until I'm sure everyone is kosher.

But that's just me and I fully admit to being mildly paranoid and cautious at times! Having a breed that many people are afraid of and make negative assumptions about even when they are being perfectly well-behaved and sweet in public will do that to a person.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmine728 View Post
My dogs have gone to dog parks all their lives... there is an occasional incident between dogs but it's rare. And like anything else.. you are more likely to hear of the few negative incidents. Going has helped one of my rescues really come out of her shell. I wouldnt go at the busiest hour though ( right after work 5-7pm) Ease them in , go in the morning or late evening when there is a smaller group of dogs. There's a great group of dogs that go to mine at 8:30 every morning.. all our dogs get along really well and have a blast together. If you go and you dont like the group of dogs, leave... try a different time but seriously dog parks are an excellent place for socialization, but DO NOT LEAVE your dog on the leash inside the park, it puts your dog at a big disadvantage and creates more issues. I've seen so many puppies brought to the park when old enough that just thrive. There's a ton of info on do's and don't at dog parks ... look them up and follow them. Most problems at dog parks have to do with owners trying to rein in their dogs instead of letting them have fun. Follow the rules of the park and you should be fine.
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Old 07-09-2011, 05:28 PM
 
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Chiroptera- yea thanks for explaining your situation better, I just hate when they get bad raps as they really are a great tool for socialization. If more people took the time like you do to understand your dog's limitations , etc.. it would help. We have some great rotti's at the park, i love seeing them there but people do get more nervous around certain breeds. I always make a point of interacting with pits and rotts, etc . The main dogs that seem to have issues are the non-neutered males. But that's to be expected with testosterone running high, luckily most pets are neutered these days and the ones that arent are either very well trained (show or breeder) or dont have a responsible owner that even care's to take them to the dog park .
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Old 07-09-2011, 07:51 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 15,363,159 times
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I am of the opinion that people who own "demonized" breeds should, ideally, be held to a higher level of responsibility as far as making sure their dogs are responsible canine citizens.

I have had a few dogs (not all Rottweilers) who were very high prey drive/dog aggressive....in controlled situations (agility or obedience trials, for instance) they were focused and on the job, but no way am I going to let a 100 lb dog frolic with a group of random dogs if I have any doubt at all...

That said, in a recent thread (why greyhounds wear muzzles was in the title) I recounted a story of camping over the holiday weekend with friends and their dogs (we've camped a couple of times a year for three years together) and the mix included a Chow, a Rottweiler x Chow, and several Labradors and my little JRT cross - she ended up at the ER vet getting stitched up from an unintentional injury inflicted by the ultimate friendly family dog: a Labrador retriever.

So, sometimes stuff happens, dogs have teeth!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmine728 View Post
Chiroptera- yea thanks for explaining your situation better, I just hate when they get bad raps as they really are a great tool for socialization. If more people took the time like you do to understand your dog's limitations , etc.. it would help. We have some great rotti's at the park, i love seeing them there but people do get more nervous around certain breeds. I always make a point of interacting with pits and rotts, etc . The main dogs that seem to have issues are the non-neutered males. But that's to be expected with testosterone running high, luckily most pets are neutered these days and the ones that arent are either very well trained (show or breeder) or dont have a responsible owner that even care's to take them to the dog park .
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:38 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,226,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarlaJane View Post
What you are doing is allowing negative sterotypes to distort your opinion of this dog. This dog is still a puppy and you are already listening to all of those that malign the breed. Careful, b/c you will create a self-fulfilling prophecy by listening to those that tell you to be fearful of these dogs and not to trust them; you will get the same back from this dog, not b/c of it's breed, but b/c of how you treated it.

There are a lot of people out there that think that certain dogs are "wired" a certain way, that a breed will determine behavior, and both are simply human excuses for an owner's failure to properly care for and/or train a dog.

Dogs are a reflection of their owners: how they have been treated by their owners and how much attention has been paid to them by their owners will determine what kind of dog you end up with, regardless of breed. Abuse or neglect a dog and it will behave aggressively (b/c it has learned that human=pain). Train a dog to fight (by rewarding it when it fights) and it will fight. Treat a dog with trust, love and kindness, and you will get the same.

Don't fall into the trap of ensuring that this dog will become vicious by assuming that it is (and treating it as such) before it has even demonstrated any vicious behavior You will ruin the dog and also end up believing a bunch of nonsense that was caused by you rather than the dog. Moreover, ALL dogs need to be watched all of the time, especially when they are puppies. This is part of normal and attentive care. If you have children, supervise their interactions with the dog, as kids usually have no idea about dogs and will do things that hurt them, causing an unwanted reaction (same as if you had left your child alone with another child/cat/horse/rabbit/toy/plant, etc.)

Begin with normal care and training and treat this dog like the cherished little creature that she is. Do not scold or hit when she bites; this is normal puppy behavior called "teething" in which dogs lose their teeth and use their mouths to explore the world (toddlers do this as well, first with their mouths, then with their hands). Redirect to a toy when she bites, especially during play. Invest in a lot of toys and/or nylabones during this phase so that she is properly directed.

If you cannot get over your prejudices with regard to this breed, then please rehome her to someone who does not have such prejudices. As another poster stated, you need to educate yourself, especially about puppy care and caring for and/or training a dog in general.
Dogs are indeed a reflection of their owners. Very well said, I completely agree. No dog, regardless of breed, is born with aggressive tendencies. That is a learned trait.

Some dogs are more submissive and trusting than others, but that does not make the others more aggressive, nor is it limited to any breed. I use a simple test to determine whether or not they will be submissive. As a puppy, I hold them upside down and gently rub their belly. If they try to right themselves, despite the belly rub, then they are not submissive. If they just lay in my hand and enjoy the belly rub, then they are submissive. It is not fool-proof by any means, but it is a good test to see if the dog will be a more independent "Alpha," and possibly more stubborn, or a submissive wimp. Personally, I prefer the more independent "Alpha" puppies. The more submissive puppies would be ideal for a family dog.

With regard to the differences in gender between dogs, I find that females tend to be smarter and more graceful than males. Males, as the OP pointed out, have a tendency to be "goofy" and clumsy, but with a great sense of humor. Females also have a tendency to be more vocal than males. It is not uncommon for females to whine, whimper, growl, or bark to convey their message. Growling, particularly for a female, is not necessarily a sign of aggressive behavior. Watch the hackles on her neck and back to judge her mood. More often than not, a growling female is saying to the other dog "you are in my space." There is no anger behind the growl (as evidenced by her hackles staying down), and most males will usually ignore such communications.

What you do not want is food aggression. It is one thing when both dogs share the same food bowl and the female growls at the male, but still allows him to eat. It is entirely a different story if that female nips at the male, or tries to bite you if you attempt to take away her food. You cannot allow that kind of behavior. They should be immediately admonished to show your disapproval.

With regard to teething, I find that sticking a baby carrot in their mouth not only gives them something crunchy to chew on other than your furniture, it also is good for them. She will begin losing her baby teeth at about 4 months, and she will reach full maturity at about a year old.

Best of luck with your new puppy!
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:46 AM
 
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Bad Rap : Bay Area Doglovers Responsible About Pit bulls

You can get accurate information from these folks.

The only aggression issues, assuming you are a responsible owner, you should be aware of with Pits (and this is true of many terrier breeds) is the possiblity of dog aggression. IF this occurs 9and it may not ever happen), it will generally happen between ages 2-4 years of age. This not something to be overly concerned with but it is something to be aware of and to guard against with ongoing socialization and training and close supervision around all other dogs as the pup grows into adolescense and adulthood.

Of course you also have to remember that many breeds with absolutely no Pit in them can be mistaken for Pits. See how successful you are: Pet Pitbull - Find the Pit Bull .
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:19 PM
 
Location: S. New Hampshire
909 posts, read 2,948,201 times
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I see there are a lot of replies already, but my 2 cents, I wouldn't worry about it. Make sure she gets enough exercise and start teaching her some basic commands if she's old enough.

Our dog was listed as both a boxer mix and Dane mix. But everyone who meets him says, "Oh got some pit bull in him I see!" Maybe it's his very large head and wrinkled brow, powerful looking chest. This dog is the mellowest dog I've ever met as a stranger. He's a little bouncier now, but he's an awesome dog. My 2yo loves to lie on him, and he just revels in it.

ETA: oh yeah, as far as high energy (aren't pitts supposed to be high energy? as well as boxers?) Shep is one of the lazier dogs I've met as well. NOT a morning dog, and only goes running with me with a lot of encouragement. Even though he could easily outrun me for miles.

Don't worry about breed, esp. since she's a mix. Just take her at her individual personality.

Last edited by maestramommy; 07-11-2011 at 01:31 PM..
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: S. New Hampshire
909 posts, read 2,948,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skelaki View Post

Of course you also have to remember that many breeds with absolutely no Pit in them can be mistaken for Pits. See how successful you are: Pet Pitbull - Find the Pit Bull .
Well I sure batted zero on that test! My Shep looks like half a dozen of those dogs including the real thing.
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:37 PM
 
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Here' some more reading for the OP:
Dog attack on baby one of the worst - National - NZ Herald News
Battle Ground family says pit bull mauled their terrier - FOX 12 - KPTV - Portland News, Weather and Sports
Boy's face could be paralyzed after pitbull attack - WLBT 3 - Jackson, MS:

Lets face REALITY. Pitbulls can easily go from nice and cute to mean and deadly. I have never read a single article where the owner of a Pitbull that attacked another animal or small child claimed the dog was vicious. No they always claim it was the sweet, wonderfull, loving docile house pet equal to Mr Bunny. Well if it attacked and killed another dog and mauled and ripped off the face of a child, obvisouly its not so sweet and loving as they thought.

You and only you must make the decission if you accept that it will be Mr. Bunny, or will it be Mr Savage, bacause if anything goes wrong, I seriosuly doubt anyone who told you it would be a loving pet will come forward to pay your medical bills. If they were such loving pets in the hands of responsible owners, there wouldn;t be any stories of loving carring responsible pitbull owners who one day was in a life and death struggle with their beloved pet.
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